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FITNESS & WELLNESS


Study: Exercise cuts risk of dying early by 50 percent
Detroit Free Press
Whatever your risk levels for heart problems — blood pressure, cholesterol, age — a new study confirms what health experts have said for years: Exercise matters. Better cardio health offered protection — a 50 percent reduction in the risk of dying early compared to those in poor cardiac health — for 58,818 patients whose medical data was examined as part of the Ford Exercise Testing Project, or FIT Project, a Henry Ford Hospital study.
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Too much parenting, not enough exercise
The Wall Street Journal
Hyper-parenting may increase the risk of physical inactivity in children, a study in the April issue of Preventive Medicine suggests. Children with parents who tended to be overly involved in their academic, athletic and social lives — a child-rearing style known as hyper-parenting — spent less time outdoors, played fewer after-school sports and were less likely to bike or walk to school, friends’ homes, parks and playgrounds than children with less-involved parents.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Can you become addicted to exercise?
The Washington Post
In a society that worships a stick-thin body image, a culture obsessed with diet and weight loss and a nation facing ever-rising obesity rates, the idea of exercise addiction as a serious health problem seems almost funny. But Katherine Schreiber and Heather A. Hausenblas take it as seriously as other researchers do eating disorders in “The Truth About Exercise Addiction: Understanding the Dark Side of Thinspiration.”
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What to eat before and after your run to maximize performance
Yahoo Health
Peak performance on race day — or, really, any day you want to get in a good jog — isn’t just about hitting the mileage. You also need the right fueling strategy in place. When it comes to what to eat before and after your run, Andrew Kastor, coach of the ASICS Mammoth Track Club and LA Road Runners, shares his three essential meals.
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DIET & NUTRITION


What diet soda does to belly fat
TIME
A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that people who drank diet soda gained almost triple the abdominal fat over nine years as those who didn’t drink diet soda. The study analyzed data from 749 people ages 65 and older who were asked, every couple of years, how many cans of soda they drank a day, and how many of those sodas were diet or regular.
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What questions do dietitians hear most? We asked a dietitian that very question
The Dallas Morning News
As a registered and licensed dietitian with Methodist Health System, Caroline Susie hears a lot of questions. No wonder, what with so much coming out these days about what to eat or not eat ... what to worry about or not worry about. We asked her for the top five questions she gets asked.
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Environmental nutrition: 10 whole grain myths busted
Chicago Tribune
At first glance, whole grains, such as whole wheat, barley, quinoa and brown rice, may not seem like a controversial topic, but misconceptions and half-truths abound, creating barriers to meeting the U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommendation to consume at least three servings of whole grains a day. Environmental Nutrition attended the conference, Whole Grains: Breaking Barriers in November 2014.
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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT


Study: Your heart may love coffee as much as you do
By Cait Harrison
Addicted to your morning java jolt? Here's a reason why that may not be so bad: A recent study found people who drink three to five cups of coffee a day may have a lower risk of heart disease than people who drink none at all. The study, published in the journal Heart, involved 25,138 South Korean men and women with no evidence of cardiovascular disease after undergoing a comprehensive exam. The participants answered a questionnaire regarding how often they consumed certain food and drink items, including coffee.
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Researchers find that exercise may slow tumor growth, improve chemotherapy
News-Medical.net
One way many cancers grow resistant to treatment is by generating a web of blood vessels that are so jumbled they fail to provide adequate oxygen to the tumor. With oxygen starvation, the tumor gains a sort of cloaking device that protects it from the toxic effects of chemotherapy drugs and radiation, which are designed to seek out well-oxygenated tissue.
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Exercise used to combat mental health issues
Medical Xpress
Following the mantra that a healthy body equals a healthy mind, exercise physiology students from the University of Queensland are providing exercise and lifestyle programs to people with mental illness. UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences clinical supervisor Dr. Steve Bartlett said the new placement scheme with Brisbane's Metro North Mental Health aimed to counter alarming health statistics for those with severe mental illness.
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VITAMINS & PHARMACEUTICALS


Hold the calcium supplements
The New York Times
“Several large, credible studies have reported a higher incidence of heart attacks in both men and women who take calcium supplements,” said Dr. Orli R. Etingin, director of the Iris Cantor Women’s Health Center at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. The total intake associated with these adverse outcomes was 1,200 milligrams a day, she said.
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Researchers: Vitamin D won't help fight high blood pressure
HealthDay News
Vitamin D may help the body in many ways, but a new data review suggests it won't do much to lower high blood pressure. Vitamin D is nicknamed the "sunshine vitamin," because the body produces the nutrient when skin is exposed to sunlight. People can also get vitamin D through such foods as eggs, milk, yogurt, tuna, salmon, cereal and orange juice.
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5 vitamins packed with age-fighting power
The Huffington Post
If you're looking for the fountain of youth, stop walking down fancy department store beauty aisles and start taking a look at your diet. While topical creams may be effective in fighting wrinkles, sagging skin and other telltale signs of aging, dermatologists say what you put in your body is just as important as what you put on your skin.
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