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FITNESS & WELLNESS

Exercise can have an effect at DNA level against fat cells
Medical News Today
A zebra can't change its stripes, but according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden, we can change our DNA. We just have to get on the treadmill more often. The study, published online in PLOS Genetics, followed 23 men during 6 months, all of whom were slightly overweight but relatively healthy. Though they were not involved in any physical activity before the study, the men were instructed to attend three spinning or aerobics classes each week.
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Exercise reorganizes the brain to be more resilient to stress
ScienceDaily
Physical activity reorganizes the brain so that its response to stress is reduced and anxiety is less likely to interfere with normal brain function, according to a research team based at Princeton University. The researchers report in the Journal of Neuroscience that when mice allowed to exercise regularly experienced a stressor — exposure to cold water — their brains exhibited a spike in the activity of neurons that shut off excitement in the ventral hippocampus, a brain region shown to regulate anxiety.
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How exercise can calm anxiety
The New York Times
In an eye-opening demonstration of nature's ingenuity, researchers at Princeton University recently discovered that exercise creates vibrant new brain cells — and then shuts them down when they shouldn't be in action. For some time, scientists studying exercise have been puzzled by physical activity's two seemingly incompatible effects on the brain.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "FITNESS."


DIET & NUTRITION


Should you switch to a gluten-free diet?
WCCO-TV
It isn't terribly difficult these days to find gluten-free products on store shelves. People with celiac disease need to get gluten completely out of their diets, but there are still others who are simply gluten intolerant. WCCO's Natalie Nyhus spoke with registered dietitian Christina Meyer-Jax to get a closer look at what gluten is, and how it affects our bodies.
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17 best and worst foods of summer
Health.com via Fox News
It's kind of a myth that summer means more exercise and healthier food choices for everyone. One eye-opening study found that kids gain weight three times faster over summer than they do the rest of the school year, thanks to a steady diet of junk food and video games.
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Diet or exercise: Which matters more for weight loss?
Women's Health via ABC News
You know you should exercise and eat healthfully to keep your weight in check. The thing is, research suggests that when people devote time to one healthy habit, they spend less time on the other. So which is more important if you're worried about your waistline: Your workout or your diet?
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Nutrition vs. fitness: Which rules mobile health?
CTV News
According to a U.S. survey, consumers who use their mobile devices for health rely on their gadgets more for nutrition and diet tracking than for fitness. In its findings, mobile operator U.S. Cellular revealed that just 10 percent of its customers use a smartphone or tablet for health and fitness on a regular basis.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Trendy paleo diet draws debate (Charlotte Observer)
Differences between the sexes stretches to fitness formulas (Reuters via Fox News)
New skinny on weight loss: Avatars might help (USA Today)
Eating mangos helps improve overall diet, nutrition (Food Product Design)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Exercise can have an effect at DNA level against fat cells
Medical News Today
A zebra can't change its stripes, but according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden, we can change our DNA. We just have to get on the treadmill more often.

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read more
Research: Total amount of exercise important, not frequency
ScienceDaily
A new study by Queen's University researchers has determined that adults who accumulated 150 minutes of exercise on a few days of the week were not any less healthy than adults who exercised more frequently throughout the week.

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The rise of the minimalist workout
The New York Times
In an article under his byline for Sports Illustrated in December 1960, "The Soft American," President-elect John F. Kennedy lamented the state of the nation's fitness.

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VITAMINS & PHARMACEUTICALS


Negative effects of vitamins on voles cast doubt on health supplement benefits
Medical Xpress
Vitamin C and vitamin E dramatically reduce the lifespan of voles, biologists have found, raising questions about the benefits of vitamins as a health supplement. A new paper published in the journal Biology Letters explains the research. The team fed field voles a diet supplemented with high levels of vitamin E or vitamin C from the age of two months in either warm or cold conditions and compared their longevity to groups of voles fed a regular diet.
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Do daily vitamins work against cancer?
dailyRx
A lot of people swear by their daily vitamins and other supplements. Taking them, many believe, helps them achieve better health. A new study suggests those beliefs may not always be supported by research. According to this particular study, taking multivitamins did not reduce the overall risk of dying from cancer.
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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT


Small lifestyle changes may have large effect on stroke risk
Healio
Better cardiovascular health is associated with lower risk for stroke, and researchers found that even small lifestyle changes could have a big effect on risk improvement. Researchers assessed stroke risk in 22,914 black and white U.S. adults aged at least 45 years.
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Cardiovascular benefits of a healthy lifestyle increased by adequate sleep
Examiner
Investigations have revealed that a good night's sleep is very important for good overall health. The American Psychological Association has noted that sleep is vital for health and well-being. However, millions of people don't get enough sleep, with resulting problems such as daytime sleepiness, interference with learning, poor decision-making and accidents.
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Study: Employees often pick lower-cost health plans
USA Today
Sixty percent of employees allowed to choose between a traditional employer-sponsored health insurance plan and a cheaper, high-deductible or limited network plan opted for the lower prices, a study of employees released shows.
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FAST FACTS
"Whooping cough is very contagious and can cause serious illness in infants, children and adults, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."


 

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