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Text version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit November 05, 2014
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Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 13-14, 2014
Bellagio Hotel
Las Vegas Nevada


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Journal of Managed Care Medicine new website released
The Journal of Managed Care Medicine (JMCM) has released its new website at www.jmcmpub.org. The website features current issues, past issues, supplements and much more. Be sure to visit the website for updates on the latest topics in managed care medicine.

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If you would like a free subscription to the Journal of Managed Care Medicine, click here and fill out the form.
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Fall Managed Care Forum 2014
The Fall Forum will be held Nov., 12-13, 2014 at the Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada for medical directors, nurses and administrators.

The Forum features up-to-date, useful information on the ACA and healthcare changes, trends and how to improve patient outcomes.

Click here to see the agenda, speakers, register and for more information on the conference.

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FITNESS & WELLNESS


How exercise changes your brain to be better at everything
Fast Company
The brain is fundamentally a lazy piece of meat, according to neuroscientist Gregory Berns. But take the body attached to it on a brisk walk or jog and suddenly your meat-brain is lighting up like a Lite-Brite. "When we exercise, blood pressure and blood flow increase everywhere in the body, including the brain," Justin Rhodes, associate professor of psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign writes in Scientific American. "More blood means more energy and oxygen, which makes our brain perform better."
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After an injury, ease into exercise
The Wall Street Journal
It’s not uncommon for athletes and weekend warriors to struggle with recurring injuries. “People think once the pain goes away they can jump back into their routine,” says Lyle Micheli, director of sports medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital. “They end up progressing too rapidly in terms of workout volume and intensity.”
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Study: Just 15 minutes of exercise a day can lower your risk of breast cancer
The Huffington Post
Whether it's a walk around the block on your lunch break or swimming a couple of laps at the gym, getting at least 15 minutes of exercise daily could reap serious rewards for your health — not just your waistline. And that's especially true for women. According to the American Cancer Society, around 1 in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer at some point in their life.
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DIET & NUTRITION


The sneaky cause of your sugar cravings
Yahoo Health
Sugar can’t catch a break these days. With everyone from from HBO comedian John Oliver to Yahoo’s Global New Anchor Katie Couric bashing sugar’s vice-like grip on the modern diet, more and more people are deciding to ditch it. The problem? It’s really, really difficult. We’re all neurologically wired to favor sweet flavors, and eating sugar sets off signals in your body that make us feel happy — and crave more of it.
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5 high-fiber foods that help lower breast cancer risk
Fox News
A high fiber diet is great for weight control and for promoting overall good health, but did you know that for women it can help reduce the risk factors for breast cancer? A recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests women can reduce their risk of breast cancer by 7 percent for every 10 grams of fiber added to their daily diet.
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What are the health benefits of Brussels sprouts?
Medical News Today
Your first memory of Brussels sprouts may be of feeding them to the dog under the table, being careful to make sure your mom didn't catch you. Little did you know, Fido didn't care for them either, and mom ended up having to sweep them up at the end of the evening. Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, but even if you've had a bad experience with them in the past, they're worth giving another shot — just don't boil them to death like your mother did.
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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT


New milk study misses the real point — milk isn't the problem
By Lauren Swan
A group of Swedish researchers has people panicking — all these years they've been drinking milk, and it turns out milk is dangerous and unhealthy, despite numerous studies proving otherwise. Milk, a new study says, is damaging to your bones and heart; it can even raise your chances of cancer and cause hip fractures in women. Got milk? Yes, too much, apparently. So should everyone just ditch milk altogether? The evidence against milk seems pretty damning if you conveniently ignore one of the most important words in the study title: cohort.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  InSightec - World Leader in MRgFUS

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Study: 65 percent of american adults are recommended behavioral weight-loss treatment
ScienceDaily
Researchers used data from the 2007-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to estimate the proportion of adults in the United States recommended for treatment. Data show 131 million American adults — about 65 percent — are recommended for behavioral weight-loss treatment, with 83 percent of those also recommended for pharmacotherapy.
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VITAMINS & PHARMACEUTICALS


The truth about vitamins: Are they actually making us healthier?
MedicalDaily
You might swear by your vitamin supplements and take your pills religiously, but how do you really know if they’re working? The jury has been out for a while on whether multivitamin supplements actually keep you healthier, or if they just have a placebo effect. But new research has been amassing and finds that overall, the effects of multivitamins are pretty much neutral, ineffective, null and void for people who are already healthy to begin with.
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FDA: Supplements, meds can be dangerous mix
HealthDay News via DoctorsLounge
Taking vitamins or other dietary supplements along with medication can be dangerous, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. Dietary supplements can alter the absorption and metabolism of prescription and over-the-counter medications, the FDA said. "Some dietary supplements may increase the effect of your medication, and other dietary supplements may decrease it," Robert Mozersky, a medical officer at the FDA, explained in an agency news release.
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5 nutritional deficiencies you might not even know you have
The Huffington Post
As we age, proper nutrition is essential for maintaining a healthy body and mind. And while we need to eat fewer calories the older we get, our bodies actually require more of certain vitamins and minerals. A number of factors may contribute to nutritional deficiencies: Some people have limited access to food due to financial constraints or physical disabilities.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How hard is moderate exercise? Not as hard as you might think (Yahoo Health)
This trick helps you work out 15 percent longer without noticing (Prevention)
7 ways to stop unhealthy food cravings (Life by DailyBurn via CNN Health)
Survey predicts top 20 fitness trends for 2015 (Health Canal)
Triggers that sabotage weight-loss efforts: Substance triggers (By Annette Radvansky)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply."
 

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