This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Nov. 13, 2013

   NAMCP   AAMCN    AAIHDS    CME/CEU    JMCM    Contact Us  

Recognizing Our Corporate Members

Abbott Laboratories
Central Care Center (C3/Welldyne)
Mediterranean Wellness

Come see Patrick Conway, MD, Chief Medical Officer at CMS speak on ACOs, the Affordable Care Act and the future of medicare at the Fall Managed Care Forum!

Join the nation's top consulting experts on Oct. 3rd, 12-1 p.m. Eastern Time for a free webinar exploring the impact of the ACA on U.S. Hospitals and what organizations can do to prepare for the changes.
Click here to register.

REGISTER TODAY
Fall Managed Care Forum
Nov. 14-15
Las Vegas

Click here to view CAP Molecular Testing Guidelines for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients!

Biodesix announces results in Phase III Lung Cancer Diagnostic Study; First Prospective Biomarker-Stratified Validation Study in Oncology. Click here to view the press release!

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 


FITNESS & WELLNESS

Keep telling yourself 'this workout feels good'
The New York Times
Tell yourself during exercise that you're not as tired as you think you are and you could make that statement true, a new study shows, reminding us that the body intertwines with the mind in ways that we are only starting to understand. For the new experiment, which was published last month in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, researchers from the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, and other institutions turned to a group of 24 healthy, physically active young men and women and asked if they would be willing to ride a bicycle to the point of limp exhaustion, repeatedly.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "EXERCISE."


Exercise during pregnancy gives babies' brains a boost
Los Angeles Times
Attention pregnant women: If you want to help your child get into Harvard, lace up those sneakers and exercise. Hardly a week goes by without science delivering new evidence that exercise boosts the brain. Studies have linked exercise to brain health in senior citizens, middle-aged adults and kids. A trio of researchers from the University of Montreal figured the same might hold true for babies in utero as well.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


High-intensity, simple workouts gain popularity
Reuters via Fox News
While people are becoming more dependent on high-tech gadgets in many areas of life, fitness experts say they are turning back to basics for their workout routines. They see more exercisers shedding prop-heavy fitness classes for short-burst, equipment-free workouts. "It's my theory that we've hit a critical mass in group fitness," said Donna Cyrus, senior vice president of programming Crunch Fitness. "Mats, Bosu (stability) balls, body bars: by the time you put all this stuff on the floor it's 10 minutes into your workout."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


20-minute exercises for your heart, from Dr. Oz
The Huffington Post
Is there a heart-healthy exercise that you can do every day, even if you only have 20 minutes? According to Dr. Oz, daytime Emmy Award winning host of "The Dr. Oz Show," the answer is yes. Even if you only have 20 minutes to squeeze in a workout on the fly, there are a few full body workout options that will do the trick.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


DIET & NUTRITION


Gluten takes a beating from fad dieters and grain giants
Bloomberg
Grain sellers want to have their gluten-free cake and eat it, too. As the stretchy protein found in wheat and other grains has become the latest dietary bogeyman, sales at companies like General Mills Inc., Kellogg Co. and Britain's Warburtons Ltd. have come under pressure. Yet instead of fighting back against a fad many dietitians contend lacks scientific grounding, they're boosting output of pricier gluten-free foods while leaving industry groups to defend their traditional products.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


50-something diet: Is it time to go vegan?
The Huffington Post
Ex-heavyweight champion Mike Tyson credits his vegan diet with helping him lose 140 pounds. Ellen DeGeneres went vegan after watching a documentary about the cruelty of factory farming. Former president Bill Clinton has dined vegan-style for more than three years to protect his heart. These are just a few of the many Americans barring all animal products from their diets, including meat, fish, eggs, dairy and even honey.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Acidic diet tied to diabetes risk for women
MedPage Today
A diet high in acidic foods — meat, fish and sodas, for instance — may put some women at greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, researchers found. In an analysis of data from the E3N-EPIC cohort, French women with higher scores on a measure of dietary acidity had about a 70 percent greater risk of developing diabetes than those whose diets were more alkaline, Guy Fagherazzi, Ph.D., of Gustave Roussy Institute in Villejuif in France, and colleagues reported online in Diabetologia.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Keep telling yourself 'this workout feels good'
The New York Times
Tell yourself during exercise that you're not as tired as you think you are and you could make that statement true, a new study shows, reminding us that the body intertwines with the mind in ways that we are only starting to understand.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Exercise: It's what we evolved to do
CNN
When it comes to healthcare, Americans disagree about much, but we do agree that our $2.7-trillion-a-year healthcare system is broken.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
What's your 'fitness age'
The New York Times
Trying to quantify your aerobic fitness is a daunting task. It usually requires access to an exercise-physiology lab.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


VITAMINS & PHARMACEUTICALS


Do vitamins and supplements help fight the common cold?
Your News Now
Zinc is a popular choice to help fight a cold. Dr. Steven Lamm said, "Zinc has been shown actually to reduce the severity sometimes by one or two days when used early on, and used as a lozenge primarily." Echinacea is another common cold form of relief. Some people say it can help boost the immune system, but there is very little data to support it. Vitamin C is also similar. People are often told to use vitamin C to fed off a cold, but it's not as good as you may think.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Experts: Vitamins don't prevent heart disease or cancer
NBC News
There's not much evidence that vitamins can prevent heart disease or cancer — the two leading killers of Americans, experts said. Even though half the U.S. population pops vitamins in the belief they can help people live longer, healthier lives, a very extensive look at the studies that have been done show it may be a waste of time when it comes to preventing the diseases most likely to kill you.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


A closer look at energy drinks with a natural kick
Los Angeles Times
Energy drinks — sugary, caffeinated beverages that are supposed to provide a quick pick-me-up — have been taking some hits lately. The natural food industry has responded with a flurry of alternatives, including replacing high-fructose corn syrup with organic evaporated cane juice and agave, sucralose with stevia, synthetic caffeine with yerba mate. Add South American "super foods" and vitamins, and you've got a new category of energy drinks.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT


10 common mistakes that prevent you from being happy and healthy today, backed by science
The Huffington Post
There are choices that you make every day, some of which seem completely unrelated to your health and happiness, that dramatically impact the way you feel mentally and physically. With that said, here are 10 common mistakes that can prevent you from being happy and healthy, and the science to back them up.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Exercise may help prevent depression later in life
Runner's World via NBC News
Running, walking and other forms of activity can help people shake off the symptom of depression. Now, a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine suggests that exercise may prevent the disorder later in life. Researchers at the University of Toronto analyzed 26 years' worth of studies and concluded that even low levels of movement — walking or gardening for 20 or 30 minutes a day — show promise of warding off depression in people of all ages.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What's your 'fitness age' (The New York Times)
Exercise: It's what we evolved to do (CNN)
Mediterranean diet linked to longer lifespan and better health (Medical News Today)
10 reasons to give up diet soda (Health.com via Fox News)
Inflammation-linked diet associated with depression in women (The Huffington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Whooping cough is very contagious and can cause serious illness in infants, children and adults, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."


 

eNews on Prevention, Wellness & Lifestyle
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Natalie Rodriguez, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2635   
Contribute news

This edition of the eNews on Prevention, Wellness & Lifestyle was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Nov. 6, 2013
Nov. 6, 2013
Oct. 30, 2013
Oct. 23, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063