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Recognizing Our Corporate Members

Abbott Laboratories
Central Care Center (C3/Welldyne)
Mediterranean Wellness

Granix is now available in the fight against neutropenia during chemotherapy. Click here to view the USPI! Visit www.granixrx.com for more information.

Click here to view the following free CME/CEU program:
Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Obesity: A Closer Look at Emerging Therapeutic Options.

Click Here to view the Journal of Managed Care Medicine

Click Here to view our Complimentary Online CME/CEU Webcasts


Announcing the NAMCP Medical Directors Breast Cancer Resource Center. Click here to visit the website.

On Aug 19, 2013, the FDA issued a label change for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin). Below is a copy of the updated USPI for your review. Key label changes found within the attachments include:

1. Dosage and Administration Section 1: 16 cycle limitation has been removed from the label. New label states "Continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity"

2. Warnings and Precautions Section 5: Growth factor support added for consistency with Dose Modification in section 2.2


CLICK HERE to view the USPI.

The Academy of Oncology Nurse Navigators white paper, "Assessing the Creative Application and Usefulness of NSider: A Tactical Tool for the Oncology Nurse Navigator" was published in the journal, The Oncology Nurse-APN/NP.

Click here to view the white paper.


 


FITNESS & WELLNESS

Physical fitness linked to better memory
Reuters via NBC News
Being in good physical shape may help preserve people's thinking and memory skills, suggests a new study. Researchers made this discovery by mapping participants' physical fitness against the number of errors they made on a range of cognitive tests over time. They found, for instance, that 80-year-olds who were at one point approximately twice as fit as their peers made about 25 percent fewer errors on a test of memory and concentration.
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Children's physical fitness declines around world
The Associated Press via The Boston Globe
Today's kids can't keep up with their parents. An analysis of studies on millions of children around the world finds they don't run as fast or as far as their parents did when they were young. On average, it takes children 90 seconds longer to run a mile than their counterparts did 30 years ago. Heart-related fitness has declined 5 percent per decade since 1975 for children ages 9 to 17.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword "EXERCISE."


Mother's exercise may boost baby's brain
The New York Times
If a woman is physically active during pregnancy, she may boost the development of her unborn child’s brain, according to a heart-tugging new study of expectant mothers and their newborns. The findings bolster a growing scientific consensus that the benefits of exercise can begin to accumulate even before someone is born.
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Fat but fit? Study reveals that fitness, not weight, predicts risk of early death
The Huffington Post
When it comes to living a long and healthy life, a meta-analysis of mortality studies finds that being physically active, no matter what your weight, trumps being thin and unfit. Researchers at Middle Tennessee State University, led by exercise scientist Vaughn Barry, Ph.D., examined 10 past studies that recorded information about participants' body mass indexes and fitness levels.
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DIET & NUTRITION


Data on Americans' diet can be hard to digest
The Wall Street Journal
What are Americans eating? Researchers trying to understand the obesity epidemic frequently ask that question. So do public health scientists seeking links between food and disease. Nutritionists want to know how many people are getting enough vitamins. But answering the question is complicated. The simplest way is to ask people what they ate yesterday, do it again a few days, weeks or months later, take an average of the two results, and assume that holds good for the rest of the year.
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Cotton ball diet trend is extremely dangerous: How some replace food with cotton to stay slim
Medical Daily
Diet and nutritional experts say the so-called "cotton-ball diet" has been around for quite some time now, but a string of recent YouTube videos and social media shares has turned it into a growing diet fad. Now healthcare professionals are worried that this new diet craze among teenagers could be the most dangerous one yet. "You're really kind of playing Russian roulette when you use these types of diets," treatment professional at the Eating Recovery Center of California, Jennifer Lombardi, told KCRA.
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Better diet tied to higher quality of life in old age
Reuters
Older adults who follow dietary guidelines tend to have a better quality of life and less trouble getting around and taking care of themselves, according to a new study. Not many prior studies had tried to tackle that issue, researchers said. "Our paper showed that maintaining an overall optimal diet quality will be beneficial for preserving the general well-being of older adults," lead author Bamini Gopinath told Reuters Health in an email.
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7 nutrients lacking in your diet
Fox News
Think you eat pretty well and get enough key nutrients? Hopefully you do, but unfortunately the diets of most Americans are far from ideal. A recent re-analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2001-2008, commissioned by Nature Made, found that the diets of most Americans are lacking in several key nutrients.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Physical fitness linked to better memory
Reuters via NBC News
Being in good physical shape may help preserve people's thinking and memory skills, suggests a new study. Researchers made this discovery by mapping participants' physical fitness against the number of errors they made on a range of cognitive tests over time.

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High-intensity, short workouts will rule 2014 — worry fitness pros
Today
Next year, your workout is going to get a lot more intense. Once the domain of fitness fanatics, high-intensity interval training is poised to hit the mainstream in 2014, according to a new survey from the American College of Sports Medicine.

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What wrecks your diet most at Thanksgiving
Women's Health via Fox News
Want to make sure you'll be able to button your jeans after Thanksgiving dinner? Limit your exposure to stealth fat bombs.

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VITAMINS & PHARMACEUTICALS


What the new statins guidelines mean for you
Fox News
When the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute released new guidelines for heart disease prevention, it doubled the pool of Americans eligible to take statins — a category of drug that lowers cholesterol and reduces heart risk in patients. As a result, many Americans might experience changes in the way their primary care physicians and cardiologists conduct future appointments.
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Setting the record straight on supplements
The Huffington Post
So many people today are confused about supplements. Even many doctors, nutritionists and other health experts are uncertain. Why? Because there's so much conflicting information in the media. One day, we're told that vitamin E is good for us; the next day, we hear it's dangerous. We're told that folate is healthy; the next day, it's deadly.
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For better or worse, vitamins are medicine, too
The Wall Street Journal
Vitamins have a good reputation. Many people think they can do only good, and never harm. Sadly, this is false. Biologically, the only difference between a vitamin and a medication is that some amount of the vitamin is necessary for life. Once you go above that amount, however, it is better to think of vitamins as pharmaceuticals, endowed with the potential for both benefit and harm.
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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT


Study: Step away from that soda — Sugary drinks raise cancer risk for women
NBC News
Here's another reason for ladies to just put down that sugary soda — it raises the risk of endometrial cancer. Women who drank the most sweet soft drinks had a 78 percent increased risk of the cancer, researchers found. But other sweet treats, such as baked goods, didn't have an effect. Nor did natural fruit juice, even though it's full of naturally occurring sugars.
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How to slash heart risks tied to obesity
HealthDay News via WebMD
Obese or overweight people who lower their blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels could cut their risk of heart disease and stroke by more than half, a new study indicates. Researchers analyzed 97 studies that included a total of more than 1.8 million people worldwide. They found that high blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels explain up to half of overweight and obese people's increased risk of heart disease.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How many sodas does it take to hurt your kidneys? (Prevention )
Fall fitness gadgets keep you active all winter (USA Today)
Avoid acrylamide: FDA warns against chemical found in many fried foods (Fox News )
9 diet supplements contain amphetamine-like compound (USA Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FAST FACTS
"Whooping cough is very contagious and can cause serious illness in infants, children and adults, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."


 

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