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  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Dec. 5, 2012

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Recognizing Our Corporate Members

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Spring Managed Care Forum
May 2-3, 2013
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 Fitness & Wellness

Pesticides in tap water linked to food allergies
ABC News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
As food allergies become increasingly common, a new study offers the first proof that they may be linked to pesticides found in tap water. Researchers at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology used existing government data to see whether people with more dichlorophenols in their urine were more likely to have food allergies. More

Study: Extra sleep could help reduce sensitivity to pain
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Getting more sleep improves daytime alertness and reduces pain sensitivity in healthy adults, according to a small new study. The research included 18 mildly sleep-deprived volunteers who spent four nights getting either their normal amount of sleep or extending their sleep time to 10 hours per night. More

Study: Smoking can damage the brain
CNN    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
That cigarette may be doing more damage than meets the eye. If you've been smoking for an extended period of time, you're likely familiar with at least some — if not all — of the bodily symptoms associated with smoking, including but not limited to coughing, shortness of breath and changes to teeth. But a new study published in the journal Age & Ageing concludes that smoking can damage your mind, too. More

 Diet & Nutrition


Study: US diets not up to US standards
Reuters    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
In a broad comparison of U.S. dietary standards and real Americans' eating habits, researchers found that people fall short of nutritional recommendations overall, but some groups are worse than others. More

Despite more 'healthy' options, little change in fast-food calorie counts
HealthDay News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
You'd like a salad? Want some fries with that? A new study shows that providing more menu options on a fast-food menu doesn't mean the average diner chows down fewer calories. More



Sugary beverages linked to kidney stone formation
Internal Medicine News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened sodas and punch are linked with an increased risk of kidney stone formation while consumption of coffee, tea and other beverages may be protective, results from a large analysis demonstrated. More

Eating away autism? The GAPS diet
WFTV-TV    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The Gut and Psychology Syndrome diet, called GAPS, was created by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, who also founded The Cambridge Nutrition Clinic. Campbell-McBride believes nutrition plays a critical role in helping children and adults overcome their disabilities. More

 Vitamins & Pharmaceuticals


Is vitamin D a good idea for diabetics?
The Huffington Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Nowadays, vitamin D is a hot topic, both within the medical field and among the general public. Compared to just a decade ago, many more patients are now coming into their physician's office asking for their vitamin D level to be checked. The so-called popularity of vitamin D has reached a level such that even people and doctors who do not generally believe in vitamins or supplements have started to jump on the bandwagon of keeping vitamin D levels hearty. More

Harvard publication cautions against brain supplements
Harvard Men's Health Watch via Natural Products Insider    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The December issue of "Harvard Men's Health Watch" explores brain health supplements, concluding many lack solid scientific evidence. Out of folic acid, vitamins B-6, B-12, C, E, coenzyme Q-10, Gingko biloba, fish oil, curcumin and coconut oil, the review said only vitamin E provided "good evidence that it treats cognitive decline or dementia." More

Vitamin D helps prevent tooth decay
Medical Daily    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Vitamin D not only helps with bone strength but also prevents the teeth from rotting, says a new study review. The study review included clinical trials on the subject from the 1920s to the 1980s, on approximately 3,000 children between the ages of 2 and 16, from several countries. The review showed that vitamin D was associated with decreased levels of tooth decay. More

 Research & Development


FDA pledges support for medical technology initiative
The Associated Press via PharmPro    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The FDA will collaborate with medical device manufacturers on a public-private partnership designed to speed up the development of new medical technology. The agency said it hopes to offer guidance to the Medical Device Innovation Consortium, a new industry-backed group that aims to simplify the design and testing of medical devices. More

The importance of human touch for cancer patients
The Mayo Clinic    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Close your eyes and remember the last time someone held your hand for a while. Remember the warmth of their skin and how it instantly made you relax? Human touch is powerful and can be an excellent way to bring stress level down a notch or two. Touch can relieve pain, reduce blood pressure and stress hormones and improve the immune system. At Mayo Clinic, practitioners have begun a program that provides a short hand massage for cancer patients to help them relax while they're receiving chemotherapy. More

FDA clears 'iPhone ECG' heart monitor
MobiHealth News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The FDA has granted a 510(K) Class II clearance to San Francisco-based AliveCor's iPhone-enabled heart monitor, which has been commonly known as the "iPhone ECG" since it first made an appearance at CES two years ago. The company announced the clearance as the mHealth Summit kicked off Dec. 3. More

FAST FACTS
"Researchers at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology used existing government data to see whether people with more dichlorophenols in their urine were more likely to have food allergies. The number of children and teens with food or digestive allergies in the United States has increased 18 percent between 1997 and 2007, according to a 2008 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."


 

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