PRESSTIME Update
Oct. 26, 2011

New NAA ad campaign celebrates newspaper media

On Oct. 24, NAA unveiled a new initiative designed to engage audiences with an upbeat message about newspapers, print and digital. Created by The Martin Agency in Richmond, Va., the "Smart is the new sexy" ad campaign leverages a blend of inviting illustrations and entertaining anecdotes to reinforce the value of newspaper media to existing and prospective consumers. Three different ads celebrate the distinctive editorial, advertising and community attributes delivered by newspapers. Available in both print and digital formats, all ads contain prompts that draw audiences to a public campaign Web page emphasizing the value of newspapers across platforms. Consumers and NAA members are encouraged to extend the conversation by tweeting with the #smartsexy hashtag, or by posting comments or personal video clips about their connection to newspapers to NAA's Facebook page. Download information about the campaign – including advertising materials, suggested scheduling and a social media guide — from a members-only Web page. If all members follow the six-week schedule (which began Monday and ends Dec. 16), it is estimated that 70 percent of U.S. adults will see the campaign an average of 7.4 times.More

Newspaper site traffic jumps in past year

Newspapers attracted 20 percent more total visits by adults 18-plus to their websites in September, compared to the same month a year ago. The analysis, performed by comScore for NAA, also indicates strong performance in other key engagement categories. In a year-over-year comparison, average daily visits were up 21 percent; total pages viewed were up 10 percent; total minutes spent were up 11 percent; and unique visitors were up 9 percent. This is the first time NAA has been able to provide an annual comparison since it began using comScore to track Web audience data in September 2010.More

NAA critical of proposal to change length of newspaper mail service

NAA has filed comments with the U.S. Postal Service to express concern about a proposed revision to service standards for periodicals. The revision essentially eliminates overnight delivery of newspapers and establishes a new two- to nine-day delivery window for newspapers and other periodicals. NAA's comments, filed on Oct. 20, point out that the revisions would cause significant problems for small daily newspapers and community newspapers, which continue to rely on the Postal Service for distribution of editorial products. "A two-day delivery standard for periodicals is utterly useless for a daily newspaper," NAA said in the comments. "No one wants to receive Tuesday’s issue, containing news of Monday's events, on Wednesday." If the Postal Service does not want to lose mail volume and revenues from daily and community newspapers, NAA's comments continued, "there must be flexibility to make appropriate arrangements to ensure that a newspaper containing news of what happened on Monday arrives in subscribers' mailboxes on Tuesday." NAA believes delivering newspapers is a vital part of the Postal Service's mission to "bind the nation together" and "without the community connectivity of newspaper delivery through the mail, the flow of information to our nation's citizens will be severely diminished."More

Fox, DirecTV retransmission battle uses newspaper ads, websites
FierceCable
Fox and DirecTV are relying on the Web and newspaper advertising to communicate with subscribers who may lose programming from Fox TV stations and cable networks on Nov. 1. Fox parent News Corp. purchased a full-page ad in The Los Angeles Times that had the banner headline "Game Over." The ad was designed to warn DirecTV customers that they could lose access to live coverage of professional and college sports games.More

Presidential candidates expected to break ad spending record
Advertising Age
The economy may still be flirting with a double-dip recession and marketers might be mulling a trim to the ad budgets, yet it's all but certain the 2012 election season will break previous spending records. In the presidential race alone, money spent on TV and digital advertising will grow substantially, topping the more than $1 billion spent in the record-setting 2007-2008 campaign cycle.More

Halloween may help Wal-Mart break curse
Advertising Age
Wal-Mart is banking on a big Halloween to scare up sales it needs to break a nine-quarter streak of declining same-store sales, having increased purchases of Halloween merchandise by 20 percent over last year, according to people familiar with the matter.More

Apple's Newsstand is already booming for some magazines
paidContent
Early indications are that Apple's new iOS features for publishers have had an immediate beneficial impact. Consumer magazine publisher Future says free container apps for its titles were downloaded two million times in three days and reports "consumer spending well in excess of normal monthly revenues."More

Technology deciphers, empowers millions of TV viewers
Technology Review
Of the approximately 300 million public comments made online worldwide every day — about two-thirds of them on Twitter — some 10 million, on average, are related to television. Bluefin Labs is one of a growing number of analytics companies parsing the meaning of comments in social media. And its CEO, Deb Roy, believes they are capturing a fundamental change in the relationship between creators and consumers of mass media. And its CEO, Deb Roy, believes the company is capturing a fundamental change in the relationship between creators and consumers of mass media.More

Flipboard founder says websites need to start looking more like print
The Telegraph
Mike McCue, the brains behind the popular free app Flipboard, says future websites will function like newspapers and magazines. "I believe the future of the Web really is going to be more like print – not exactly, obviously, [there are] going to be differences – it's going to be more interactive. But increasingly, I hope we will a future of the Web which puts content first like we do at Flipboard."More

Limited use of buttons shows people's desire to share privately
Poynter
Despite the social sharing buttons ubiquitous on news stories and other Web pages, the dominant method of sharing is still the old-fashioned copy-and-paste of a page URL. AddThis, which provides sharing tools embedded on 10 million websites, says between 70 and 95 percent of all link sharing occurs by copying and pasting a URL, not by clicking a button on the page.More

Orange County Register takes tablet app to TV territory
NetNewsCheck
Six months after the launch of its widely-followed tablet app, The Orange County Register is learning that recurring video features — namely two- to three-minute TV-style weekly "shows" about high school football, extreme sports and tech issues — are driving user engagement.More