NAPT MultiView News Brief
June. 8, 2010

Rell signs school bus seat-belt bill
The Hartford Courant
Gov. M. Jodi Rell signed a bill that creates a state program to help school systems pay for equipping their school buses with lap-and-shoulder seat belts. The General Assembly passed the bill in response to the Jan. 9 death of Vikas Parikh, 16, a Rocky Hill High School student, who died when the bus in which he was riding — which did not have seat belts — plunged down an embankment after a collision on I-84, one of Connecticut's main highway.More

Reason, not emotion, must shape bus seat belt law
Newark Advocate
The tragic death of a Muskingum County kindergartner in a bus crash on his way to a calamity make-up day saddened everyone across Ohio. There now is a proposal pending in the Ohio House to require seat belts on new or refurbished school buses by 2014. The tragic event placed unusual momentum behind the measure's passage through the Ohio House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.More

School bus drivers to undergo more background checks
The Salt Lake Tribune
Utah school bus drivers may soon undergo more background checks due to a 2008 legislative audit that sounded alarms about some drivers' histories. The state Board of Education approved new standards that would require all new school bus drivers to submit fingerprints to the state's Bureau of Criminal Identification and undergo FBI background checks.More

Washtenaw County, Michigan school bus drivers face deep wage cuts
International Committee of the Fourth International
Bus drivers, mechanics, and aides for ten public school districts in Washtenaw County, Michigan are targeted for layoffs, double-digit wage cuts, and other attacks under a countywide consolidation plan. The proposal will affect hundreds of bus workers and tens of thousands of students across Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and surrounding towns.More

Bus company Arriva goes back to school
The Location London
A BUS company is going back to school as it launches a new project to turn one of its vehicles into a classroom. The Arriva School Bus will teach children about the environmental benefits of bus travel, as well as how to use and behave on buses. More



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LaHood envisions the future of transportation
NPR
U.S. Sec. of Transportation Ray LaHood turned transportation policy on its head with a declaration that pedestrians and cyclists should be treated as equals with drivers. That means federal dollars for more projects geared toward walking and cycling.More

Facing a wrecked electric vehicle, what must EMS staff know?
All Cars Electric
By the end of this year, several fully modern, highway-capable electric vehicles will go on sale. Sooner or later, one of them will get into an accident. What should emergency responders do when faced with a high-voltage battery pack that could kill them if mishandled?More

Long Beach Transit cuts will increase time waiting for buses
Press-Telegram
Some riders will spend more time waiting for a bus this fall as a result of budget cuts approved by Long Beach Transit. Facing declining revenue, the transportation agency has decided to reduce its overall service hours by about three percent, partly by making less frequent stops along certain routes, beginning with the fall school semester. More

Smart cards tap into future of city transit systems
Government Technology
If a new pilot runs smoothly, public transit riders in New York and New Jersey may soon be swiping out the ubiquitous MetroCards for "smart cards" that allow them to ride subways and buses with a single tap.More

How to conquer your e-mail inbox
Forbes
We love our e-mail. We love its efficiency, its clarity and the fact that it creates a detailed, searchable record. E-mail can also make us a little nuts. Step away from it for a couple of hours, messages pile up. When we confront more than 50, it can feel like a combination of depression, weariness and low-grade panic, until we can make that "unread" number disappear. Here's a method that may help the madness.More

Is digital revolution driving decline in US car culture?
Advertising Age
The internet has wreaked havoc on the music industry, airlines and media, but it just may be doing the same thing to automobiles. It's a rarely acknowledged transformational shift that's been going on under the noses of marketers for as long as 15 years: The automobile, once a rite of passage for American youth, is becoming less relevant to a growing number of people under 30. And that could have broad implications for marketers in industries far beyond insurance, gasoline and retail. More

Airport Security 2.0
National Geographic Traveler
What the TSA needs to do to protect air travelers. And what we can do to help. Now playing at an airport near you: Stern-faced agents. Snaking lines. Screeching magnetometers. Put them together, and it makes for compelling theater. But just how safe are we, really?More

Keep your computers tuned up, backed up, and cleaned up
Bloomberg Businessweek
Most small business owners probably own an automobile that they maintain properly for optimal performance. The same logic should apply to your computer network and other devices. After all, who can afford disruptions, data loss, or downtime? Gartner estimates that 40 percent of businesses suffering a business interruption fail within five years. The following are a few essential guidelines for ensuring your network and computing and communications systems run smoothly.More

WE ARE LOOKING FOR HEROS

2010 NAPT Heroism Award – Sponsored by Blue bird

Webster's dictionary defines a hero as "a person of distinguished courage or ability, admired for his/her brave deeds and noble qualities."

Keeping a cool head while transporting 50 boisterous students during rush hour traffic sounds like a hero's job to me but that's just a normal day! When things truly go awry, as when buses are broadsided by falling lumber, catch fire or a child stops breathing on the bus, that’s when heros shine. Past winners of the Heroism Award have managed just these sorts of trauma. And they have done so brilliantly.

Each year at the NAPT Annual Conference (Summit) and Trade Show, the NAPT Heroism Award, sponsored by the Blue Bird Corporation, is bestowed upon individuals who perform selfless acts of courage. Please consider nominating someone for this award if they meet the following criteria:

An application must be submitted by an NAPT member and endorsed by two colleagues.

Please submit an application to NAPT Headquarters at 1840 Western Ave., Albany, NY 12203, postmarked no later than September 1.

The winner will receive an all expenses paid trip to the NAPT Annual Conference and a commemorative plaque. Winners are notified by the Committee Chair no later than October 1.

For more information, click (More). More