NAPT MultiView News Brief
Nov. 2, 2010

Bullying survey: Most teens have hit someone out of anger
USA Today
Half of U.S. high schoolers say they have bullied or teased someone at least once in the past year, and nearly half say they have been bullied in that time, one of the largest studies ever on bullying finds. The study surveyed 43,321 teens ages 15 to 18, from 78 public and 22 private schools. It finds 50 percent said they had "bullied, teased or taunted someone at least once," and 47 percent had been "bullied, teased or taunted in a way that seriously upset me at least once." The survey findings are from the Ethics of American Youth Survey by the Josephson Institute of Ethics, a non-profit based in Los Angeles that has surveyed teens on conduct and behavior every two years since 1992.More

DOT, EPA set nation's first GHG, fuel efficiency standards for trucks, buses
Environmental Leader
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Transportation have unveiled the first national standards to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel efficiency of heavy-duty trucks and buses. The new proposed standards are for three categories of heavy trucks — combination tractors, heavy-duty pickups and vans, and vocational vehicles. The program, proposed by EPA and DOT's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is projected to reduce GHG emissions by about 250 million metric tons and save 500 million barrels of oil over the lives of the vehicles produced within the program's first five years.More

Are school buses safe?
The Huffington Post
Several school bus accidents have raised concern that older buses should be retrofitted with seatbelts. However, a recent study affirmed that, not only were buses "safe enough without seat belts," but because of their dimensions, were six to eight times safer than riding in cars. More

DOT awards $2.4 billion to continue developing 21st century high-speed passenger rail corridors
The Department of Transportation Fastlane
Recently, the Obama Administration and the Department of Transportation awarded $2.4 billion for planning and construction of intercity passenger rail service. With these 54 projects in 23 states, the DOT is moving full-speed ahead toward a nationwide high-speed rail system. President Obama signed the Recovery Act to build bridges between the Americans who needed jobs and the infrastructure jobs that needed doing. One of those jobs was creating a 21st century rail system in the United States.More

Stay focused, avoid driving distractions
The Fort Gordon Signal
A new Kelly Blue Book poll of 7,700 people show 22 percent said they've been distracted while driving by their cell phone closely followed by 21 percent who said they eat while driving. Thirteen percent said they are guilty of texting behind the wheel. Messing with the Global Positioning System came in fourth at 12 percent and finally 7 percent said they use their IPod in the car. Distracted driving caused 5,500 deaths nationwide in 2009, according to Ray LaHood, U.S. Secretary of Transportation. More

School zones dangerous for kids
CBS News
Walking is the healthy way for kids to get to school. But you might be surprised what we found out in an "Early Show" investigation: Kids could be most at risk while walking to school — in school zones. "Early Show" Consumer Correspondent Susan Koeppen said, "At least two children have been killed by cars in school zones since the start of the school year." We watched as car after car sped through school zones at double and even triple the speed limit."More

Why the economy's growth isn't easing unemployment
The Associated Press via Google News
An economy growing 2 percent a year might be tolerable in normal times. Today, it's a near-disaster. A growth rate of 5 percent or higher is needed to put a major dent in the nation's 9.6 percent unemployment rate. "To really get 'Morning in America' and get people feeling like jobs are really coming back, I would want to see something close to 5 percent" annual economic growth, says economist Josh Bivens of the Economic Policy Institute, referring to the iconic 1984 Reagan re-election ad.More

Operation Upcycle converts school buses to natural gas - to reduce emissions, save schools money
Mountain Xpress
With teaching jobs and budgets on the line, here comes Operation Upcycle, an opportunity for school districts to boost their budget savings through a stimulus grant program that converts school buses to burn compressed natural gas. The grant, funded by the EPA and others, is an inexpensive and easy way for a school district to renovate its fleet and convert the older bus engines to burn CNG, which could save thousands of dollars over the purchase of new a $90,000 plus bus.More

Planning and deploying transit signal priority in small and medium-sized cities
National Center for Transit Research
preferential traffic signal strategies and treatments for transit buses and other vehicles at signalized intersections in cities of all sizes. The primary objective of this paper is three fold: 1) to synthesize the literature of the lessons learned associated with planning and deploying transit signal priority (TSP) strategies in small and medium-sized cities; 2) to demonstrate the application of a micro-simulation model, VISSIM, to assess transit priority impacts in small and medium-sized communities where the required VISSIM input data are often limited; and 3) to present guidelines to aid traffic engineers and transit planners who are considering TSP strategies in small and medium-sized cities. An underlying aim of this paper is to recognize the differences in transit priority planning and deployment in small and medium-sized cities as compared to major metropolitan areas.More

Fairfield bus driver teaches safety through song
FOX19
Elementary school students on bus 25 in the Fairfield School District are singing their way to school. "Kids learn more when you sing songs and make it fun," said Fairfield bus driver, Susan Flick. That's why Flick, bus driver, has taken it upon herself to teach her students songs about health and safety on the school bus. "And I think the reason why they love it is because everybody sings, it doesn't matter if you're in the four grade or the first grade, we're together on this," Flick said.More