Self-Employed OutFront Weekly
Apr. 7, 2015

This entrepreneur launched 52 businesses in 1 year.
Here's how he survived.

Entrepreneur
Calling it the most transformative experience of his entrepreneurial life, 29-year-old Colin Grussing has officially made good on a dizzying vow: to build a new business every week for one year. Entitled 52businesses, the project was derived by New Orleans-based Grussing last March to help destigmatize the early-stage startup paradigm. In addition to conceiving proprietary ventures, 52businesses pivoted partway through its mission to serve as a kind of collaborative consultant for existing startups and nonprofits. They welcomed ventures of every stripe, Grussing says, from scalable concepts to local mom-and-pops.More

10 steps to turn your passion into money
The Huffington Post
A lot of us feel stuck. But here's the thing — we're not stuck. There are ways to climb out of your current situation, find what you love, and turn it into a cash-generating career. Sound like a long shot? Not if you have a plan, and these steps can help you develop one.More

Using customer service for retention and renewals
Small Business Trends
If you want to build a successful business, you need to build a base of loyal customers. That means that you not only need to convince customers to do business with you in the first place, but you also need to convince them to come back and do business with you over and over again. How can you do this? The answer is in your customer service.More

Growth without franchising: Why this entrepreneur decided to sell her expertise instead
Bizwomen
After more than a decade spent creating highly personalized gift baskets for everyone from children to corporate brass to Academy Award-nominated Hollywood stars, Elena Yearly has reached a turning point in her business. The 57-year-old founder of Chantilly, Virgina-based Nostalgia Baskets knows she has a winning concept: Her baskets sell for between $75 and $700. She's got hundreds of industry contacts. She's regularly tapped to speak at gift-basket industry conventions and trade shows. More

What to know about the next Google algorithm update
Business 2 Community
It seems as if Google is always keeping us marketers on our toes. The holy grail of online marketing has always been a number one ranking in Google search results, but with Google constantly changing the rules of the game – from Panda to Humingbird to getting rid of Google Authorship – getting to and staying at the top of the search engine results pages (SERPs) ca seem like a pipe dream. Just when you think you're up to date and that your website is thriving, then you realize you're about to be further behind the game with a new Google algorithm update. More

How content marketing can help small businesses grow
LinkedIn
Content marketing is ALL the rage! You and I, as well as a growing number of consumers ignore ads, have banner blindness, skip commercials on TV when they can. So how can small businesses and entrepreneurs leverage quality content to induce growth and profits?More

The most common reasons startups fail
Fast Company
Founders blame investors, investors blame CEOs, CEOs blame research and development, R&D say the product is fine, the market just doesn't get it, and marketing people blame it all on the recession. Some startups succeed, yet so many fail, and it’s failure that teaches us the best lessons. What are the main reasons why startups fail? In a survey carried out by tech blog ArcticStartup and CoFounder magazine, more than 100 startup entrepreneurs share their experiences and lessons learned.More

The 8 most common small business accounting mistakes
Bplans Blog
Thanks to the huge range of accounting applications available for today's small and medium-sized businesses, it's easier than ever to keep an accurate record of where your business's money is going. While accounting software has made bookkeeping and accounting easier for small businesses, it's also made errors and accounting mistakes — from incorrectly categorizing a transaction to doing all accounting yourself — much more common. More