NDA Newsletter
Sep. 12, 2014

Deadline for ENR Demolition Insert is Monday!
NDA

The deadline to submit project or product stories for this year's Demolition Insert, which will run in the October 27th issue of McGraw-Hill's Engineering News-Record magazine, is Monday, September 15th. These stories should be sent to NDA Ex. Director Mike Taylor at mtaylor@demolitionassociation.com in WORD along with one or two photographs. The annual ENR Demolition Insert is one of the largest public relations efforts that the NDA undertakes each year. With a circulation of well over 250,000, ENR is one of the most read construction publications in the world and presents the Association with an outstanding opportunity to showcase the skills and products of its members. For more information about this year's ENR Demolition Insert see the attached flier. More

Tour Volvo's Headquarters & Proving Ground as part of Gettysburg Board Meeting
NDA
The fall Board Meeting of the National Demolition Association at the Gettysburg Hotel on September 26th & 27th will include an all-day tour of Volvo Construction Equipment's new North American Headquarters and Proving Ground in nearby Shippensburg, PA on Friday, September 26th where you can test out the company's latest equipment. Bus transportation and a luncheon will be provided by Volvo.

Friday night's cocktail reception and dinner after the Volvo tour will feature a presentation about the three-day battle at Gettysburg in July of 1863. There will also be a tour of the battlefield after the Saturday Board of Directors meeting at 3:00 PM on September 27th. For more information about this program contact info@demolitionassociation.com.More

Follow NDA on Twitter!
NDA
NDA has gone social! Stay ahead of the game by following us on Twitter.More

Public-private partnership funds demolition of dilapidated homes in Atlas, Pennsylvania
Insurance News Net
The Northumberland County (Pennsylvania) Housing Authority is funding the rest with a combined $18,000 in donations from four private donors. The donors took advantage of a program, Neighborhood Assistance Program Tax Credits, which will provide them a 75 percent state tax credit. When the project is completed, the township will look to market the vacant space, which includes a fourth small lot from a property demolished several years ago.More

Crews discover giant beehive at former tire plant
The Joplin Globe
Demolition crews discovered a stinging surprise while working to tear down an Ottawa County, Oklahoma, plant formerly owned by a tire manufacturing company. Workers sifting through parts of the former B.F. Goodrich plant recently stumbled upon a hive containing as many as 50,000 Italian honeybees, Miami, Oklahoma's emergency management director Glenda Longan told The Tulsa World.More

Florida demolition price tag tops $3 million
Construction & Demolition Recycling
A real estate developer has estimated it will cost $3.8 million to tear down an under utilized shopping mall and a nearby highway ramp on riverfront property near downtown Jacksonville, Florida. According to a report by the Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville-based Sleiman Enterprises has given $3.8 million as the estimated cost to clear the site of the Jacksonville Landing retail center along with a nearby highway ramp.More

Public-private partnership funds demolition of dilapidated homes in Atlas, Pennsylvania
Insurance News Net
The Northumberland County (Pennsylvania) Housing Authority is funding the rest with a combined $18,000 in donations from four private donors — Sunbury Motors, FNB Bank, Susquehanna Bank and Swineford National Bank. The funds were split for the Atlas project and a project in Sunbury. The donors took advantage of a program, Neighborhood Assistance Program Tax Credits, which will provide them a 75 percent state tax credit. When the project is completed, the township will look to market the vacant space, which includes a fourth small lot from a property demolished several years ago.More

Does protecting historic New York neighborhoods mean less affordable housing?
Quartz
Can you regulate aesthetics? Can economists measure it? Those are the questions raised by historic preservation districts — areas where buildings are restricted to specific architectural styles and sizes. Their advocates say they protect the character of a city, and raise the values of the homes there. Critics say that, by restricting development, they make housing less affordable across an entire city. A new study by a group of urban researchers, including urban economist Edward Glaeser and law professor Vicki Been, looks at the experience of New York City — and tentatively finds that both sides of this debate are right.More

Indianapolis targets abandoned homes for demolition
WTHR-TV
Blighted and vacant homes were being torn down Sept. 8 in Indianapolis. It's a step toward fighting crime in the city. "It helps to know that someone's living in them," said St. Clair Place resident Ernest Colins. "I think it really means a lot for the neighborhood," said St. Clair Place resident Liz Munson. The demolitions are a part of the Blight Elimination Program. The program makes $75 million available across the state, with $6.4 million in Indianapolis.More

Desert dust-up over demolition of tribe's Spa Resort in Palm Springs, California
Los Angeles Times
Tribal rights bumped up against historic preservation in Palm Springs, California, recently, when the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians started tearing down a 1959 spa and casino in a city that is passionate about midcentury modern architecture. The downtown Spa Resort Casino complex’s concrete-domed entrance colonnade, which led to the property's hot springs, was the first feature to be torn down in a process that will take months.More

Coast Guard plan to rebuild Hurricane Sandy-damaged buildings angers historic groups
NJ Advance Media via NJ.com
A plan by the U.S. Coast Guard to rebuild some of its Hurricane Sandy-damaged buildings on Sandy Hook has some local residents concerned the proposal ignores key historic features about the area and could jeopardize the success of a redevelopment initiative at the popular tourist spot. The struggle over the Coast Guard’s plans to demolish and replace three buildings centers on how much the federal life-saving agency will be permitted to do under state and federal historic preservation regulations.More

Plenty of light! Feds are selling off lighthouses
The Associated Press via Yahoo News
Lighthouses for sale! Actually, lots of lighthouses for free. Technological advances and a desire to purge unneeded properties have paved the way for the federal government to get rid of more than 100 lighthouses over the last 14 years, and it intends to keep selling and giving them away. The sold lighthouses, located on both coasts and in the Great Lakes states, have become everything from museums to bed-and-breakfasts. Sixty-eight of the lighthouses have gone for free to preservationists while 36 others sold at public auction thanks to the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act of 2000, which allows the government to dispose of federally-owned lighthouses.More

Canton, Ohio, officials OK new demolition program
The CantonRep
Dangerous and dilapidated commercial and residential buildings may fall under the weight of a $750,000 demolition program approved by the Canton, Ohio, City Council on Sept. 8. Funding through the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development’s Community Development Block Grant program could allow the city to fund, either partially or in full, the demolition of the old Lehman High School, 1120 15th St. NW, the vacant R.L. Spaulding Corp. building at 1906 Harrisburg Road NE and/or the former McQueen Sign & Lighting Co. building at 1017 12th St. NE.More

Detroit raises safety in residential razings
The Detroit News
Andre Bey wasn’t surprised a couple of weeks ago to see a blighted house being torn down directly across the street in his northwest Detroit neighborhood, because the city is conducting a record-setting number of residential demolitions. But this time, he knew it was coming and understood how to protect his family. The city in May rolled out regulations for its contractors, hired watchdogs to monitor demolitions and mounted an aggressive campaign to inform residents how to guard against dust and debris that pose potential health risks.More