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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Archive   Media Kit           February 12, 2015


 



Lawmakers aim to protect farm animals in U.S. research
The New York Times
Farm animals used in federal experiments to help the meat industry would receive new protections against mistreatment and neglect under legislation introduced by a bipartisan group of lawmakers from both houses of Congress. The bill aims to extend the federal Animal Welfare Act to shield cows, pigs, sheep and other animals used for agricultural research at federal facilities, including the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center, Nebraska, a unit of the Department of Agriculture. The act, which became law in 1966, excluded those animals, focusing largely on cats and dogs used in laboratory research.
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Biologic therapies research gets a boost with $42.5 million donation
AVMA
Media magnate John Malone and his wife have donated $42.5 million to Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences — the largest cash gift in university history — for translational research that benefits human and animal health. The donation will launch the CSU Institute for Biologic Translational Therapies to investigate next-generation treatments that involve the use of gene therapy, stem cells, specialized tissue replacement and novel proteins. These therapies have the potential to provide more effective and longer-lasting treatment for equine athletes and people with osteoarthritis, orthopedic injuries and other ailments.
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UW researcher studies the rare Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease
The Daily Cardinal
The enormity of research available at the University of Wisconsin-Madison comes as no surprise to the students on campus. The research subjects range from common ones such as cancer research to something as rare as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. Regardless, the research conducted by Dr. Ian Duncan, professor of neurology at the School of Veterinary Medicine, is certainly captivating in its process of understanding the underlying mechanism of this neurodegenerative disease as well as finding potential therapeutic approaches
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Pet groomers, kennels are unregulated
WIVB-TV
VideoBrief Pet groomers and kennel operators don't have to be licensed in New York State and are not subject to inspections. Lyle Burghduff has been grooming dogs for more than 40 years and works at Curtain Call Grooming Salon on Kensington Avenue in Buffalo. She says that the business is a lot more difficult than people think. Burghduff has never needed a special license, and never had any regular inspections. "If there was a complaint, I'm not sure who you would complain to," Burghduff admitted to News 4.
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Peak Pharmaceuticals brings CBD-based therapies to pets
Emerging Growth LLC via MarketWatch
The medical marijuana industry has grown at a 16.2 percent CAGR between 2009 and 2014 to reach $2 billion in revenue, according to IBISWorld, driven by widespread legalization and promising new data from clinical trials. Some of the non-psychoactive cannabinoids found within the drug — including cannabidiol — could prove useful in treating conditions ranging from neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease to metabolic diseases like diabetes or obesity.
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Feline acute pancreatitis: Current concepts in diagnosis and therapy
Today's Veterinary Practice
Feline pancreatic lipase assay measurement, clinical findings and ultrasonographic changes in the pancreas are the three components clinicians rely on to make a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Dr. Jane Armstrong provides guidance on diagnostic evaluation and therapy options — initial, medical, nutritional and surgical — for treating patients with acute pancreatitis.
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Why do cats love boxes so much?
Wired
Take heart feline enthusiasts. Your cat's continued indifference toward her new Deluxe Scratch DJ Deck may be disappointing, but there is an object that's pretty much guaranteed to pique her interest. That object, as the Internet has so thoroughly documented, is a box.
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Pet owners to veterinarians: Tell us about parasite risks
DVM360 MAGAZINE via dvm360.com
In 2014, in an effort called Connecting with Today's Clients, the Companion Animal Parasite Council, supported by Bayer HealthCare, surveyed U.S. veterinarians, veterinary team members and pet owners to gain some insight into whether all groups are on the same page when it comes to parasite control. They interviewed 401 practicing veterinarians and 263 veterinary team members who work at least 30 hours a week in practices that see 75 percent or more small animals in a nonemergency setting.
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University of Florida researchers work on Brucella vaccine
Veterinary Practice News
University of Florida researchers are developing and testing Brucella vaccine varieties in cattle that will hopefully, in turn, help humans. "The concept we are taking is, if we can eradicate this disease from livestock, we can eradicate the disease from humans," said David Pascual, Ph.D., a professor of mucosal immunology at the University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine.
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Newborn horses give clues to autism
University of California, Davis
Just a few hours after its birth, the long-legged brown foal stands in its stall, appearing on first glance to be sound, sturdy, and healthy. But something is very wrong with this newborn horse.
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Mycoplasma infection and feline asthma-chronic bronchitis
Winn Feline Foundation
Mycoplasma species are small bacteria lacking a peptidoglycan cell wall that belong to the normal bacterial flora of the upper airway in cats. This organism has been detected in cats with upper respiratory infections, with lower respiratory tract infections and with inflammatory bronchial diseases such as feline asthma or chronic bronchitis.
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Cat genes could hold vital clues to treatments for human diseases
The Guardian
Scientists have recruited a new ally in their battle to fight disease: domestic cats. They believe the genetic profiles of cats contain crucial clues about diseases to which humans and felines are both susceptible. These illnesses include diabetes, asthma and some causes of blindness.
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Big Bark All Natural Beef Jerky Treats recalled due to salmonella
DVM360 MAGAZINE via dvm360.com
Grill-Phoria LLC of Loveland, Colorado, has ceased production and distribution of Big Bark All Natural Beef Jerky Treats for Dogs after routine sampling of the finished product tested positive for salmonella. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports that the company has recalled approximately 200 3.5-ounce bags of jerky treats distributed and manufactured between Sept. 20, 2014, and Jan. 2.
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Veterinary eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Katina Smallwood, Senior Editor, 469.420.2675  
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