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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Archive   Media Kit        July 10, 2014


 



US House passes Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act
AVMA
The U.S. House passed the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act July 8. This important bill will make it legal for veterinarians to transport and use controlled substances beyond their primary places of registration and across state lines to treat their animal patients. As you may recall, the Senate passed its version of the bill back in January, so this action by the House brings the bill one step closer to the president's desk.
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Tramadol to become a DEA Schedule IV controlled substance
NYSVMS
The Drug Enforcement Administration published its decision to schedule tramadol as a Schedule IV controlled substance. The rule becomes effective Aug. 18. Click here for the DEA's final rule on Tramadol. Tramadol has been classified as a Schedule IV controlled substance in New York State since Feb. 23, 2013. Click here for the alert NYSVMS sent to members at that time. We will be updating our Knowledge Center Document to encompass the national changes in the near future.
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Heart disease a bigger issue for cats than previously thought
Chicago Tribune
The effects of heart disease in cats can be more devastating than veterinarians previously thought. Based on his studies, veterinary cardiologist Dr. Philip Fox, of the Animal Medical Center in New York City, says that cats diagnosed with feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy face a 1-in-5 chance of developing either heart failure or blood clots, both of which can be fatal.
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Veterinarians needed to staff the Hall of Veterinary Health
NYSVMS
This year's New York State Fair will be held Thursday, Aug. 21, through Monday, Sept. 1, in Syracuse. The Hall of Veterinary Health is one of the primary ways the NYSVMS promotes veterinary medicine to the public. It showcases modern veterinary medicine in a fun, educational way and includes several interactive displays, live demonstrations and is an excellent opportunity for fairgoers to talk with veterinarians. To make the Hall of Veterinary Health a success, we need your help! We need veterinarians to help staff the exhibit every day. Please email staff@nysvms.org for more information or if you would like to volunteer!
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NYPD cracks down on animal abuse and neglect
amNewYork
The New York Police Department and American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals — newly united to ferret out animal cruelty in New York City — were in Tompkins Square Park and Union Square Park recently raising public awareness about animal abuse. Their message? Call 911 if you know a crime against an animal is in progress. Call 311 if you suspect an animal is being abused or neglected.
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Pet reptiles and salmonella infection
AVMA
Pet bearded dragons and frozen feeder rodents being used to feed pet reptiles were among the sources of recent outbreaks of salmonellosis in humans in the U.S. As of late May, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released three other reports of salmonella outbreak investigations from 2014. The sources were live poultry, chicken products and raw cashew cheese, a nondairy product made from raw cashews.
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First cancer immunotherapy for dogs developed
Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien via ScienceDaily
Nearly every second dog develops cancer from the age of 10 years onward. A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs. A very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not been available for animals so far. Scientists have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs.
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The COE now accepting applications for site visitors
AVMA
The Council on Education is now accepting applications for veterinarians interested in serving as site visitors. Applicants with a background in large-animal medicine are encouraged to apply. Site visitors will conduct veterinary school accreditation site visits on behalf of the Council on Education. The deadline for receipt of applications for site visitor candidates is Aug. 1. The application form and a more detailed description of the responsibilities of site visitors and the application process are available on the AVMA website.
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Animal vaccines should guide malaria research
University of Adelaide via Medical Xpress
Research into vaccines for malaria in humans should be guided by the success shown in producing effective vaccines for malaria like diseases in animals, according to a University of Adelaide study. In an article in the journal Parasitology, veterinarian and disease researcher Milton McAllister says there are many effective vaccines for diseases in animals caused by close relatives of the parasites that cause malaria (called protozoans).
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Equine Lyme neuroborreliosis
The Horse
Researchers might not know everything about horse health conditions, but they often know enough about ailments to render some type of treatment. However, there are some conditions that remain difficult to treat, diagnose and study. One of those conditions is equine Lyme neuroborreliosis.
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Study of animal urination could lead to better-engineered products
Georgia Institute of Technology via ScienceDaily
A new study investigated how quickly 32 animals urinate. It turns out that it's all about the same. Even though an elephant's bladder is 3,600 times larger than a cat's, both animals relieve themselves in about 20 seconds.
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