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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Archive   Media Kit        October 09, 2014


 

Appeals Court weighs personhood for Tommy, the chimpanzee
Times Union
If Tommy the chimpanzee is to attain "personhood," it won't be done easily. A lawyer who told an appeals court that he believes the ape should be legally declared a person was grilled by the panel of five state Supreme Court justices, some of whom appeared to be highly skeptical of the merits of his argument. Steven Wise, a Florida attorney who heads the Nonhuman Rights Project, ultimately wants Tommy, a 26-year-old chimpanzee, to be freed from his current residence in Montgomery County, and placed in a preserve for chimpanzees. Wise has not accused Tommy's owners, Patrick Lavery and Diane Lavery of Gloversville, of violating any laws, but brought the court action against them because he contends that Tommy is being held against his will in a cage in a warehouse-type building.
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Cat receives lifesaving xenotransfusion
ABC News
VideoBriefA sick cat in Florida got a lifesaving blood transfusion from an unlikely donor: a dog. Buttercup is now recovering at home after the procedure at Marathon Veterinary Hospital in the middle Florida Keys.
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Just added: Saturday morning breakfast with Simmons at NYS-VC Fall
NYSVMS
NYS-VC Fall is upon us! Will we be seeing you at Cornell this weekend? If you are coming, be sure to join conference sponsor Simmons Saturday morning at 7 a.m. in the Hagan Room for Sunrise With Simmons. Breakfast will be served, and there will be a presentation, Your Veterinary Practice: Using a Planned Exit Strategy.
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Slime-producing molecules help spread disease from cats to sea otters
University of California, Davis
The spread of diseases from land animals to sea otters and other marine mammals is aided and abetted by gelatinous, sticky polymers produced by seaweed, reports a research team headed by a UC Davis veterinary infectious-disease expert. These large, complex molecules form slimy biofilms and bind waterborne organic matter into larger particles, in which disease-causing microorganisms can become embedded and introduced to the marine food chain, the researchers discovered. Using the parasite Toxoplasma gondii as a model, they showed how these sticky polymers increase the chance that disease-causing organisms would be picked up by marine snails, which graze on kelp and are among the common foods of some endangered sea otters.
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Spanish Ebola patient's dog is put to death
The Wall Street Journal
Spanish authorities, ignoring protests by animal-rights activists, killed the dog of a nursing aide infected with Ebola. Excalibur, a 12-year-old rescue dog, had been left at home alone after Teresa Romero tested positive for the virus and was quarantined in a hospital. Madrid's regional government obtained a court order to put Excalibur down, citing a risk that the 12-year-old mixed-breed dog might be infected with Ebola and could pass the virus to humans.
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Study: Dogs can get Ebola
Mashable
The actions by the Spanish authorities have led to questions as to whether Ebola can actually be transmitted from a dog to a human. Although academic research on Ebola in canines is limited, a 2005 study published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases journal suggests that dogs are susceptible to the virus, just like humans.
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The DEA final rule takes effect Oct. 9
AVMA
The Drug Enforcement Administration final rule, published Sept. 9 and effective Oct. 9, will establish more options for the secure disposal of controlled substances by practitioners and their clients. This will benefit veterinarians, animal owners and the environment alike by expanding options and reducing complications and confusion.
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Pet bites: Don't be a hero in your veterinary practice
FIRSTLINE via dvm360.com
Safety is a word that gets thrown around veterinary hospitals regularly, but it may never get the full attention that it deserves. While a certain amount of danger is inherent to our industry, it's also imperative to take every possible precaution to reduce the possibility of injury to our team members — and to avoid costly insurance increases.
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Hypersalivation in horses
The Horse
Serous, slightly slimy and warm, slobber is pretty gross no matter the source. But while a dog's drivel might simply send you to the sink to wash your hands, a horse's should cause more concern. Excessive equine salivation is uncommon, but streams of slobber can be signposts of severe conditions with potentially life-altering implications for both horses and their people.
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Support legislation that helps Old MacDonald get the veterinary care his animals need
AVMA
All across the United States, there are rural communities that lack access to veterinary care. Farmers and ranchers depend on veterinarians for routine medical and emergency services that help prevent and monitor for diseases, protect our food supply, and promote the health and welfare of livestock. There is a bill in Congress that could help.
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Pet foods: Not all brands follow meat regulations
Chapman University via ScienceDaily
Pet food mislabeling: The issue is a significant one when it comes to commercial pet foods marketed for dogs and cats. New research set out to identify meat species present as well as any instances of mislabeling. Of the 52 products tested, 31 were labeled correctly, 20 were potentially mislabeled and one contained a nonspecific meat ingredient that could not be verified.
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Targeted feral cat sterilization yields lower euthanasia rates
AVMA
A University of Florida study of a feline trap-neuter-return program found that a targeted approach helped effectively manage the feral cat population and reduce shelter euthanasia rates in the area. Results of the two-year study showed that sterilizing feral cats in a region of historically high animal-control impoundments led to a steep decline in the number of cats that were admitted to and euthanized at the local shelter.
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Terramycin for dogs and cats returns
Veterinary Practice News
Drugmaker Zoetis Inc. has reintroduced the eye ointment Terramycin more than two years after supply issues curtailed distribution. Terramycin Ophthalmic Ointment with Polymyxin B Sulfate is indicated for the treatment of superficial ocular infection and bacterial inflammatory conditions in dogs and cats.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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