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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Archive   Media Kit           December 18, 2014


 

State approves ban on tattoos and piercings for pets, companion animals
The Associated Press via The Daily Star
Body art is not for animals, at least not in New York. It will soon be a crime to pierce or tattoo your companion animal anywhere in the state. The law signed Monday by Gov. Andrew Cuomo takes effect in 120 days. There's an exception for markings done under a veterinarian's supervision for a medical reason or identification. NYSVMS Large Animal Chair, David Leahy, was quoted in the Daily Star article, saying he is in favor of the law. "The veterinary community does not support such practices," he said.
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Under new N.J. bill, piercing cat's ears gets harsher punishment than piercing child's
NJ Advance Media
Earlier this week, the New Jersey Assembly voted almost unanimously to approve a bill (A3588) sponsored by Assemblymen Carmelo G. Garica, Jason O'Donnell and Raj Mukherji clarifying that needlessly piercing or tattooing an animal "for the entertainment and amusement of an unscrupulous pet owner" would be an animal cruelty offense. Those found in violation of the amended statute would be guilty a fourth degree crime, punishable by up to 18 months in jail.
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De Blasio taking steps to end ferret ban in New York City
The New York Times
Mayor Bill de Blasio prides himself on confronting New York's knottiest civic problems, such as expanding classroom time for preschoolers and lowering the cost of urban housing. Now his administration is sinking its teeth into a friskier challenge: legalizing ferrets. The city's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is urging the repeal of a policy that prohibits New Yorkers from keeping ferrets as pets, declaring that the musky, sharp-toothed mammals pose no greater risk to the public than other domesticated creatures.
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Kids play veterinarian with animals of Central Park Zoo
New York Daily News
A group of children has been getting up close and very personal with the beasts of Central Park Zoo through the Little Zoo Vets program. The innovative after-school program gives kids between ages 8 and 10 an inside look at working with animals. NYSVMS member John Sykes, a senior veterinarian for the Wildlife Conservation Society, created Little Zoo Vets this fall after being inspired by David (Dr. Dave) Bessler, a veterinarian who has offered similar programs out of BluePearl Veterinary Partners on the Upper West Side.
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Save the date: NYS-VC Spring
NYSVMS
Don't miss the Second Annual NYS-VC Spring, May 15-17, at the Hilton Westchester in Rye Brook. Highlights include: Case Reviews with Alexander de Lahunta, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVP; Lyme Consensus Team Debate featuring Drs. Goldstein, Labato, Littman and Wagner; dedicated technician, surgery and medicine tracks; and the ever popular Purple Party and Silent Auction.
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Meniscus regenerated with 3-D printed implant
Columbia University Medical Center via Science Codex
Columbia University Medical Center researchers have devised a way to replace the knee's protective lining, called the meniscus, using a personalized 3D-printed implant, or scaffold, infused with human growth factors that prompt the body to regenerate the lining on its own. The therapy, successfully tested in sheep, could provide the first effective and long-lasting repair of damaged menisci. The paper was published in the online edition of Science Translational Medicine. "As a veterinary orthopedic surgeon-scientist on this multi-disciplinary team, I foresee the added bonus of having new techniques for treating veterinary patients with torn knee meniscus," said Lisa Ann Fortier, DVM, professor of large animal surgery at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.
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WSU vets successfully treat dog tumors with scorpion-derived Tumor Paint
Puget Sound Business Journal
Innovations from Seattle's biotechnology world are usually meant to benefit humans, but one recent creation is having positive affect on the canine community, too. Tumor Paint, an imaging agent is derived from a synthetic scorpion venom, helps doctors distinguish cancerous tumors from healthy parts of the body during surgery by making malignant cells glow, is currently being tested in human clinical trials in Los Angeles, Calif., and Australia. But it has also helped get rid of cancer in some dogs in Washington state.
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Government orders COE to mend rift with veterinarians
Veterinary Information Network
The National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI), an 18-member oversight committee within USDE, addressed the volume of complaints against the AVMA when it ordered the agency last Thursday to reach out to critics. "Obviously there's something, that 900 concerns and complaints came to us," said Arthur Rothkopf, NACIQI vice chairman and president emeritus of Lafayette College. "It's very extraordinary to have this number. Obviously there's a political problem here, some kind of internal politics."
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UC Davis creates veterinary resources for diagnosing EPM
The Horse
While it might not seem difficult to visually identify a horse as neurologic, diagnosing equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) can be a detailed process of evaluating the history, physical examination and neurological examination of the horse. To assist veterinarians in diagnosing EPM, veterinarians at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the has created several resources designed to will help trained equine veterinarians determine if their patients could be suffering from the debilitating neurologic disease.
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LSU vets successfully treat equine coronavirus case
The Horse
This month, staff at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH) at the Louisiana State University (LSU) School of Veterinary Medicine successfully treated the first case of equine coronavirus, an emerging disease of global concern for both the veterinary and equine communities.
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Two New York State senators oppose horse-carriage ban, warn of 'real battle'
New York Daily News
Two Democratic state senators are the latest to come out in opposition to Mayor de Blasio's push to ban horse carriages in the city. Sens. Diane Savino, chairwoman of the Senate Labor Committee, and Jose Peralta, the panel's ranking minority party member, have drafted a letter to de Blasio and City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito vehemently opposing to the Council bill on the mayor's plan. The bill was introduced in City Hall last week.
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Penn Vet-Berkeley study: New therapy holds promise for restoring vision
University of Pennsylvania
A new chemical-genetic therapy restores light responses to the retinas of blind mice and dogs and enables the mice to guide their behavior according to visual cues, setting the stage for clinical trial in humans. The therapy employs a virus to insert a gene for a common ion channel into normally non-photosensitive cells of the retina that survive after the light-responsive rod and cone photoreceptor cells die as a result of diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Photoswitches, chemicals that change shape when hit with light, are then delivered to the eye and attach to the ion channels to make them open in response to light, activating the retinal cells and restoring light sensitivity.
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WSU veterinary college gains accreditation of Utah partner
Washington State University
Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine has received approval of its educational agreement with Utah State University from the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education, the profession's official accrediting body. The college has formalized four-year partnerships with Utah and Montana to create an expanded regional veterinary educational program under the states' first-letter acronym, WIMU.
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Seven things you can do to make the holidays safer for your pet
AVMA
As the holidays approach, here are some tips to make the holidays safer for your pet.
  • Keep people food out of the reach of your pet and ask your guests to do the same.
  • Make sure your pet doesn't have any access to treats, especially those containing chocolate, xylitol, grapes/raisins, onions or other toxic foods.
  • Don't leave your pet alone in the room with lit candles, a decorated tree or potpourri.

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Top gadget gifts for your pets
USA Today
VideoBriefDid you know just about as many pets as people are getting a gift this holiday season? In a recent survey, about 85 percent of pet owners said man's best friend is at, or near, the very top of their list. Here are some of the most pawsome gifts for pets and the people who love them.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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