PAMA Mx News Watch
Jul. 9, 2014

Boeing, Spirit assessing effects of train derailment
AINonline
Boeing and Spirit Aerosystems have dispatched a team of experts to the site of a train derailment in Montana to assess the damage to six 737 fuselages, three of which slid down an embankment and into the Clark Fork River. Of the 19 cars that derailed near Rivulet, Montana, several also contained assembles for the 777 and 747. Video and still footage from the scene showed a major split near the front of at least one of the 737 fuselages. According to Boeing, inspection of fuselage panels and a lower lobe for the 777 as well as a leading edge flight surface for the 747 showed no damage.More

1st A320neo rolls off Airbus assembly line, 1st flight in September
The Birmingham News
Airbus celebrated a huge milestone with the completion of its first A320neo, announcing the aircraft's flight test campaign will begin in September. The assembly, which began in March in Toulouse, France, concluded with the painting of the jetliner and the mounting of Pratt & Whitney PW1100G-JM engines. The narrow-body plane, known as MSN6101, is slated to enter service in the fourth quarter 2015. Specifically, the first of Airbus' "new engine option" aircraft is equipped with extensive flight test instrumentation for handling qualities, performance and engine tests, along with the high-altitude, and hot- and cold-weather campaigns. More

The new avgas
Aviation Pros
Looking back 25 years, no one would have thought there would be a problem with having enough avgas to fly general aviation aircraft. Today there are price issues and environmental concerns. There have been a couple of significant events regarding avgas recently. First, a major player has announced its unleaded 100+ octane avgas, and the second, the federal government has set aside money for testing candidate fuels and published a very detailed roadmap of the steps for testing fuels from the companies developing candidate fuels. More

Pro Star Aviation promotes Kurt Kitner to avionics installations manager
AVweb
Pro Star Aviation, LLC is pleased to announce the promotion of Kurt Kitner from Avionics Installations Lead to avionics installations manager. Kitner has been working as an installations lead since Pro Star Aviation's founding in 1998. Before Pro Star, he worked at Stead Aviation in Manchester, New Hampshire, for 10 years as both a mechanic and installations technician. He obtained his A&P certification through the U.S. Marine Corps, where he worked as a crew chief and mechanic. More

StandardAero and Swiftair celebrate 100th PW100 engine repair delivery
Aviation Pros
StandardAero celebrated the re-delivery of its 100th PW100 engine serviced for Swiftair during a recent celebration at Swiftair headquarters in Madrid, Spain. A private company, Swiftair was established in 1986. The airline has more than 400 employees and a fleet of more than 30 aircraft, which includes Boeing 737 and MD83, ATR72/42, Embraer 120 and Metroliner aircraft. Swiftair operates scheduled and charter, passenger and cargo flights in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. The 100th engine serviced represents a significant milestone since the two companies established their partnership in the year 2000.More

Fast pace of Boeing 787 fixes challenges operators
AINonline
Resistant to grounding their Boeing 787-8s for even a short time, several operators have indefinitely deferred addressing fixes to some of the airplanes' last remaining glitches, presenting the manufacturer with an "issue" as it marches toward its target dispatch reliability rate of 99.6 percent. Now seeing a three-month rolling average of roughly 98.5 percent, Boeing expects to reach its benchmark — established by the world's 777 fleet — by the second quarter of next year, Boeing 787 vice president and chief project engineer Bob Whittington told reporters during a series of briefings the company held in the Seattle area recently.More

Michigan woman recalls time as fighter plane mechanic during WWII
The Flint Journal
Jewell Frances Chandler had never driven a car before she learned to fix the airplanes that would help win WWII. Now 91 and living in Flint, Michigan, she grew up on a farm in Missouri. She grew up to be a teacher in a one-room school house. It was a different world then, one where, if she got sick, there was no such thing as substitute teaching. School was just canceled. In 1943, her mother walked to town and signed her up for the Navy. It was something she wanted. When school was out for summer, she left her life on the farm and went to New York for boot camp. More