PBUS News Update
Aug. 2, 2012

How to impose technological restraints on criminal offenders
Law Technology News
Twenty-five years ago, pretrial release and sentencing options were limited to community supervision or incarceration. Although substance abuse and mental health treatment conditions were imposed, electronic home confinement, now referred to as "location monitoring" to encompass global position systems, was only in its infancy. Now, few release or sentencing options – with the exception of incarceration – impact defendants and offenders like the imposition of technological conditions.More

PBUS seeks input on winter, mid-year meetings
Professional Bail Agents of the United States
PBUS wants your feedback regarding the winter and mid-year meetings in order to make them more educational and enjoyable for our members and future members. Please take a few minutes to complete this survey. We appreciate your assistance!More

Gun ruling may become a model for the nation
USA Today
In a decision that may become a model for the nation, a federal judge in Wilmington, Del., ruled that gun restrictions imposed by the Wilmington Housing Authority on its residents are constitutional. The housing authority's policy of prohibiting residents from openly carrying firearms in "common areas" of public housing buildings is reasonable and does not unduly restrict residents' Second Amendment right to own and possess a gun, U.S. District Judge Leonard P. Stark wrote in a 42-page opinion.More

Alabama bail bond fee lawsuit still alive
Montgomery Advertiser
An Alabama judge dismissed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a state law imposing bail bond fees, but the plaintiffs hope a second lawsuit fares better.At issue is a law that, along with imposing docket fees, attaches a $35 fee to every bail bond executed. The law also imposes a fee of 3.5 percent of the bail amount, capped at $450 for misdemeanors and $750 for felonies.More

Tennessee fugitive costs bond companies big money
WTVF-TV
VideoBriefWhen Gene Beck disappeared last July, right before his plea deal in Rutherford County, Tenn., on child rape charges, he cost several bail bonds companies large sums of money. Beck was out of jail on a $1 million bond in Rutherford County and several bond companies took on that liability.More

Feds team up with Philly cops to target violent crime
Philadelphia Daily News
When federal agents and Philadelphia cops arrested a group of gun-toting men near the airport – thwarting an alleged plan to rob a drug dealer – the takedown was the result of a new partnership between federal and local officials to combat violent and drug-related crime across the city. Attorney General Eric Holder and Mayor Nutter announced the partnership at City Hall recently. The partnership includes more than 50 federal law-enforcement officials, and Holder said that during a four-month "surge," which began June 4, federal resources are being used to build local capacity, enhance training, coordinate outreach, bolster intelligence and help plan and execute more sophisticated criminal investigations and prosecutions.More

Study: Illegal immigrants often returning to jail after release
Fox News
Roughly one in six illegal immigrants is re-arrested on criminal charges within three years of release, according to new government data. The findings, obtained by Fox News, are contained in reports by the Republican-controlled House Judiciary Committee and nonpartisan Congressional Research Service. They are the result of the committee’s subpoena request for Department of Homeland Security records from October 2008 to July 2011.More

Grand jury: Electronic monitoring of pretrial inmates can save California county money, relieve packed jail
Palo Alto Daily News
San Mateo County, Calif., could reduce the number of inmates at its packed Redwood City jail and save money by electronically monitoring those awaiting trial, according to a grand jury report. Although the county plans to build a new $160 million jail in Redwood City that could eventually accommodate up to 768 beds, it won't open for years from now and conditions at the existing Maguire Correctional Facility, meanwhile, are dangerously overcrowded, San Mateo Civil Grand Jury Foreman Bruce MacMillan told The Daily News.More

Pennsylvania county works to cut DUIs by issuing alcohol-monitoring bracelets
York Daily Record
A new effort that can require repeat driving under the influence defendants to wear an alcohol-monitoring bracelet before trial will help to save lives and protect the public, York County, Pa., officials say. People who are arrested on second or subsequent DUI offenses can be required to wear a Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol Monitor bracelet and abstain from alcohol as part of their bail conditions. It is intended to prevent defendants from being arrested again on new DUI charges while awaiting trial, and to help them get into rehabilitation sooner.More

Hit-and-run suspect in custody after pursuit by police, bounty hunter
The Sacramento Bee
A driver sought in a hit and run crash was taken into custody by Sacramento, Calif., police after a pursuit by police and local bounty hunter Leonard Padilla. Padilla said he and his driver, Reuben Salgado, were traveling north on Highway 99 near Fruitridge Road when they saw a vehicle coming up behind them weaving in and out of traffic.More

Las Vegas DUI case led to German fugitive
The Associated Press via Ventura County Star
A fingerprint match in a Las Vegas-area drunken driving case led U.S. authorities to a German fugitive in a $100 million international fraud scheme who had been on the run for five years, authorities said. U.S. marshals recently learned that a fingerprint from a 51-year-old man arrested in February 2011 belonged to Ulrich Felix Anton Engler, and they joined Las Vegas police financial crimes detectives to locate and arrest him, Las Vegas police Officer Bill Cassell said.More

California counties report fewer fugitive felons
The Associated Press via the San Francisco Chronicle
Fewer felons are skipping out on probation under California's new criminal justice realignment than under the state's old parole system, according to a report. The report obtained by The Associated Press is the first six-month snapshot of trends in all 58 counties. It found that less than 4 percent of felons failed to report to their county probation officers after their release from state prison, compared to 14 percent who faced fugitive arrest warrants for failing to report to their parole officers under the old system.More