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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          March 12, 2015

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SCAI NEWS


Follow Your Passion and Attend a Committee Meeting at SCAI 2015
SCAI
Want to help advance interventional cardiology care? Then it's the perfect time to lend your expertise to a SCAI Committee.

SCAI is reminding members that its next slate of full committee meetings will take place on Wednesday, May 6, and Thursday, May 7, in conjunction with SCAI 2015 Scientific Sessions at Hilton San Diego Bayfront (May 6-9).

Remember SCAI's unique open-door policy means that every SCAI member is invited to attend virtually any committee meeting of their choice. No formal appointments, no need to RSVP. Just take a look at the schedule and see what interests you. Then come check it out! View the schedule of SCAI committee meetings at SCAI 2015.

Acknowledgements
SCAI expresses deep appreciation for the generous educational grant support of the SCAI 2015 Scientific Sessions while taking sole responsibility for all content developed and disseminated through this event.
  • Platinum supporters: Abbott Vascular; Medtronic
  • Silver supporter: AstraZeneca
  • Bronze supporters: Cook Medical; Gilead; The Medicines Company, St. Jude Medical

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SCAI 2015 Congenital Track Highlighted by Interactive Cases, Great Debates, Trial Updates and More
SCAI
The Congenital Heart Disease Track at SCAI 2015 Scientific Sessions will allow pediatric interventional cardiologists, cath lab nurses and technologists to exercise their problem-solving skills and develop new insights into difficult cases, treatment debates and emerging research and technologies.

"With this program, we're going to dig deeper into a selected array of issues and ask the difficult and important questions, a lot of which have to do with either the limitations in our understanding or technology," says SCAI 2015 CHD Program Chair Dr. Doff McElhinney, FSCAI. Learn more about the Congenital Track at SCAI 2015.

Acknowledgements
SCAI expresses deep appreciation for the generous educational grant support of the SCAI 2015 Scientific Sessions while taking sole responsibility for all content developed and disseminated through this event.
  • Platinum supporters: Abbott Vascular; Medtronic
  • Silver supporter: AstraZeneca
  • Bronze supporters: Cook Medical; Gilead; The Medicines Company, St. Jude Medical

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Need to Brush Up on Your Knowledge of FFR and IVUS?
SCAI
Need to brush up on your knowledge of FFR and IVUS? SCAI's Mastering FFR-IVUS Online Curriculum is the place to start.

"The FFR and IVUS curriculum will appeal to physicians at all stages of their careers," said Program Director Dr. Morton Kern, MSCAI. "Achieving a balance between basic and advanced concepts is a critical component of this program. Fellows-in-training will get a great deal out of the course by working in conjunction with their program directors to understand and relate the material, and practicing physicians will benefit from the overview of rudimentary concepts before devolving into more cutting-edge material."



Like other courses in SCAI's growing eLearning Library, the FFR/IVUS course material is a complimentary benefit available to all SCAI members, who can also purchase CME credit at a discounted rate as they successfully complete each model. The program features 10 modules that overview both basic and advanced information in this increasingly recognized area of interventional cardiology. Sign up for the Mastering FFR-IVUS Online Curriculum today.

Acknowledgements
This program is supported by Volcano. The society gratefully acknowledges this support while taking sole responsibility for all content developed and disseminated through this effort.

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Image of the Week
SCAI
Daniel H. Steinberg, MD, FSCAI, of the Medical University of South Carolina presents a case of "Post TAVR Troubles." Review the case and weigh in on the best next management step.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Giant Cell Arteritis: CV Risk Analysis Yields Surprises
MedPage Today
Somewhat counterintuitively, multiple cardiovascular risk factors are less frequent at the time of incidence of giant cell arteritis than in non-GCA, and GCA carries no overall increased risk of acute coronary syndrome, reports an online study in the March 2015 issue of Arthritis Care and Research. "Because GCA is a systemic inflammatory condition affecting the elderly and is treated with long-term glucocorticosteroid therapy, patients with this disease may be at an increased risk of coronary artery disease," wrote researchers led by rheumatologist Dr. Prabhu D. Udayakumar, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis.
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Screening for and Treating Depression Could Help Reduce Risk of Heart Disease
Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute via News-Medical.net
A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute has found that screening for and treating depression could help to reduce the risk of heart disease in patients with moderate to severe depression. Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute, the flagship facility for the Intermountain Healthcare system based in Salt Lake City, analyzed the health records and rates of death, coronary artery disease and stroke of more than 26,000 patients treated by Intermountain over a three-year period.
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Study Bolsters Link Between Heart Disease, Excessive Sitting
American College of Cardiology via Medical Xpress
Sitting for many hours per day is associated with increased coronary artery calcification, a marker of subclinical heart disease that can increase the risk of a heart attack, according to research scheduled for presentation at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego. Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death in the United States.
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Depressed People Receiving Treatment Are 'Less Likely to Have Heart Problems'
Medical News Today
In a three-year study of 5,000 patients with moderate or severe depression, those treated with antidepressants seemed to show lower rates of death, coronary artery disease and stroke than those who did not take the drugs. The association appeared to be stronger for treating more severe cases of depression than was the effect of using statin drugs to reduce cardiovascular risk, say the doctors from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.
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Study Shows Who Benefits Most From Statins
Health Canal
New research suggests that widely used statin therapy provides the most benefit to patients with the highest genetic risk of heart attack. Using a relatively straightforward genetic analysis, the researchers assessed heart attack risk independently of traditional risk factors such as age, sex, so-called good and bad cholesterol levels, smoking history, family history and whether the patient has diabetes.
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Special Procedure Rooms: Will TAVR Shift to the Catheterization Laboratory?
DOTmed.com
Special procedure rooms are coming into their own, driven by both innovation and the need to justify costs that has come to be a dominant trend driving change in the healthcare landscape. For example, transcatheter aortic-valve replacement is generally done in a hybrid operating room, but the conventional wisdom is that the open-heart surgery alternative will eventually migrate into the cardiac catheterization laboratory, resulting in a substantial cost savings.
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Study Questions Appropriate Use Criteria for Angiography
MedPage Today
Roughly a third of patients with diagnostic angiography deemed "inappropriate" under current appropriate use criteria actually had obstructive coronary artery disease, and more than 40 percent with "appropriate" angiograms did not, according to a population-based study. An analysis of outcomes from close to 50,000 procedures in a Canadian registry revealed that among the roughly 1 in 10 patients with angiography deemed inappropriate, 30.9 percent had obstructive coronary artery disease, and 18.9 percent underwent revascularization, reported Dr. Harindra Wijeysundera and colleagues of Sunnybrook Health Science Center in Ontario, Canada.
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Meta-analysis: DEB, DES Superior to Plain Old Balloon Angioplasty for In-stent Restenosis
Healio
Use of drug-eluting balloons or stents for the treatment of in-stent restenosis was superior to plain old balloon angioplasty alone for the prevention of target lesion revascularization, according to a meta-analysis of current treatment options for in-stent restenosis. Researchers analyzed 11 randomized controlled trials that compared drug-eluting balloons, drug-eluting stents and plain old balloon angioplasty for the treatment of in-stent restenosis in 2,059 patients with bare-metal stent or drug-eluting stent in-stent restenosis.
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Common Antidepressant May Hold the Key to Heart Failure Reversal
Temple University via Medical Xpress
A team led by researchers at Temple University School of Medicine found that a commonly prescribed antidepressant restored heart function in mice with heart failure, a finding that could lead to clinical trials for a disease long considered irreversible. The team, which was led by Walter J. Koch, Ph.D., found that the antidepressant paroxetine (also known as Paxil), reversed heart failure in mice.
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ONLINE JOB BOARD

Job Title Employer Location
Invasive or Interventional Cardiologist Dover Cardiology Center Toms River, NC
Physician - Interventional Cardiology Community Health Systems Oklahoma City, OK
Physician - Interventional Cardiology Community Health Systems Ponca City, OK
Interventional + General Cardiology A. Berendt Associates Inc. Southeast Coast, FL

  For a complete list of job postings, click here
  To post your resume, click here


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Date Event Location
March 12 SCAI 2015: LBCT Submission Deadline Online
March 25 SCAI Session at CIT 2015 Beijing
March 25 SCAI 2015: Advance Registration Deadline Online
April 2-5 SCAI Back to Basics Course at NIC New Delhi
April 23-24 SCAI Fellows Course Dubai Dubai, UAE
May 6-9 SCAI 2015 Scientific Sessions San Diego
May 8 Cath Lab Leadership Boot Camp at SCAI 2015 San Diego
May 8 C3 SUMMIT® for Fellows at SCAI 2015 San Diego
May 15-17 SCAI Turkey Fellows Course Turkey
August SCAI China Fellows Course TBA



The news summaries appearing in SCAI This Week are based on original information from news organizations and are produced by Multibriefs, an independent e-mail newsletter publisher. SCAI is not responsible for the content of sites external to SCAI, nor do reports in SCAI This Week constitute the official opinion of SCAI. The SCAI This Week news roundup is provided as a timely update for SCAI members and other healthcare professionals. Links to articles are provided for readers' convenience and may be of use in discussions with patients or colleagues. Questions and comments about SCAI This Week may be directed to Multibriefs at scai@multibriefs.com.


 



SCAI This Week
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Katina Smallwoood, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2675 
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