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Don't miss the 2015 SCAPTA Annual Conference
SCAPTA
Oh the places you'll go and people you'll see,
Running shoe selection to pelvic floor dysfunction,
Pediatric outcomes to athletic aquatics,
To infinity and beyond these courses will take you,
It's everything you want and nothing you don't,
So join us at this years SCAPTA Annual conference May 1 & 2, in Greenville, South Carolina.

Check out all the available programming for this years SCAPTA Annual Conference at http://scapta.org/annual-conference.

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SCAPTA NEWS


Vacancy on SCAPTA Board of Directors
SCAPTA
Due to the appointment of Kristen Mason to fill the remaining term of secretary, there is now a vacancy on the SCAPTA BOD. This position will be filled by an appointment from the SCAPTA BOD and will be for the remainder of her term until Annual Conference 2016. Please contact Gretchen at seif@musc.edu if you are interested in this position by no later than 12:00 noon on Feb. 23.
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HAVE YOU HEARD? MUSC has a new Master of Science in Health Informatics (MSHI) program designed to ensure graduates are prepared (a) to select, implement, use, and evaluate healthcare information systems such as electronic health records (EHRs) and data management and analytic systems; (b) to lead organizational efforts in health informatics and IT; and (c) to apply data analytical skills to transform patient care and the care delivery process. Graduates of the program will be prepared to assume positions as data analytics officers, clinical system analysts, health IT project managers, and chief medical/nursing information officers in hospitals, physician practices, and other health care settings.


SCAPTA to appoint delegate for 2015 House of Delegates
SCAPTA
SCAPTA will need to appoint a delegate for the 2015 House of Delegates in National Harbor, Maryland, May 31-June 3, 2015. This position will be filled by an appointment from the SCAPTA BOD. Please contact Gretchen at seif@musc.edu if you are interested in this position by no later than 12:00 noon on Feb. 28.
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Don't miss the Carolina Clinical Education Consortium Spring Conference
The Carolina Clinical Education Consortium Spring conference is at Elon University March 20-21.

Course 1 (1.6 CEUs) is the Basic CI credentialing course.
Course 1's intended audience: Physical Therapists who have been APTA Basic Credentialed CIs for a year or more.
Fees:
  • APTA Members = $175.00 PT/PTA
  • Non-APTA members = $265.00
  • Other Healthcare Providers = $315.00

  • Course 2 (1.8 CEUs for course and 0.2 CEUs for pre-course assignments.)
    The program's unique philosophy and design will enable physical therapists, who are APTA basic credentialed CIs, to achieve the best outcomes for student learning by concurrently advancing concepts of clinical teaching and clinical practice.
    Fees:
  • APTA Members = $235.00
  • Non-APTA members = $360.00

  • Registration and further information is found at Carolina Clinical Education Consortium. Register and pay through PayPal on the CCEC site. For further information, contact Linda Eargle at lkeargle@yahoo.com

    DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION IS FEB. 27.


    INDUSTRY NEWS


    Athletic tape may have limited benefit for pain
    Reuters
    Therapeutic tape reduces chronic muscle pain better than no treatment at all but isn't better than other methods, according to a new analysis. The tape, which often goes by the name Kinesio, can sometimes be seen on the skin of high-profile athletes, and is purported to reduce pain and promote healing by improving circulation to the tissues underneath, write the researchers in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
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    Stroke: Intense PT gets quick results
    MedPage Today
    An accelerated, task-based rehabilitation program helped patients with pure motor strokes recover hand and arm function quicker, but it did not produce better long-term outcomes compared with usual care, researchers found. Patients in the accelerated arm of the Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation trial averaged more than twice as much physical therapy as patients in other arms of the trial.
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    Study: Achilles tendon can handle downhill running
    HealthDay News via Philadelphia Insider
    The Achilles tendon can handle downhill running better than previously thought, says a study that offers good news for distance runners. The key is to transition gradually to downhill running, the Brigham Young University researchers noted.
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    Senate to review HIPAA security of medical records in light of Anthem breach
    Medical Economics
    A monumental data breach at one of the nation's largest insurance providers has spurred a bipartisan effort to reexamine the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), possible adding a costly and cumbersome requirement to encrypt health records. The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee announced Feb. 6 that it is planning a new bipartisan initiative to examine the security of all health information technology and the healthcare industry's preparedness against cyber attacks.
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    Miss an issue of the SCAPTA News? Click here to visit the SCAPTA News archive page.


    IOM: Chronic fatigue syndrome a 'real' disease in need of a new name and diagnostic criteria
    PT in Motion
    The Institute of Medicine says that not only is chronic fatigue syndrome a "real" disease, it's one that deserves a more accurate name — "systemic exertion intolerance disease" — and a new code in the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition. In a 282-page document, an IOM panel reports on its efforts to evaluate current clinical diagnostic criteria and develop new criteria for CFS, consider possible changes to terminology, and suggest a strategy for dissemination of the report's conclusions.
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    Feds, states extend Obamacare enrollment period for some
    USA Today
    Americans who couldn't enroll in federal Obamacare insurance plans over the weekend because of computer glitches or long waits will now have until next Sunday to sign up, federal officials announced.
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    Myth or reality: Treadmill just as good as road running
    ABC News
    Frigid temperatures and unrelenting snow mean a lot of exercisers stuck indoors grinding out their miles on a treadmill. Many of them wonder if their run to nowhere is somehow inferior to hitting the pavement, track or trails. Let's break it down.
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    Doctor's attire affects patient's trust
    PsychCentral
    Patients are more likely to have trust and confidence in doctors who are wearing either suits or white coats, compared to those in casual attire, according to a new analysis by the University of Michigan Health System. The exception is during an emergency situation, however, in which case clothes don’t seem to matter very much.
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    A free marketing technique that helped get my practice going strong
    By Jarod Carter
    When my PT practice was just a couple weeks old, the few patients I was seeing each week were not enough to pay the bills. I had to act fast to fill my schedule, and I did so through a variety of marketing techniques. I'm in full support of those who want to add non-PT services like personal training, yoga and Pilates to their practice, but this was not something I wanted to do early on. So if I wasn't going to hire these professionals as employees/contractors, I should at least get them to send me patients, right?
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        SC Supreme Court ready to weigh in on physician-owned physical therapy services (SCAPTA)
    Creating more profitable private physical therapy practices (PPS Impact)
    The state of consolidation in outpatient PT (By Charlotte Bohnett)
    Now accepting nominations for SCAPTA Awards (SCAPTA)
    New center to increase physical therapy research (Phys.org)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



     



    SCAPTA News

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