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Managing the injured runner
By Heidi Dawson
Runners are a notoriously difficult "breed" to handle for the physical therapist. In fact, a colleague of mine has an orthopedic surgeon friend who says he would "rather treat heroin addicts than runners." Ouch!

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SCAPTA elections opened Friday — Feb. 28
SCAPTA
Elections opened electronically and via mailed ballot on Feb. 28, and will close on March 14. The opportunity to vote will also be made available to members at the SCAPTA Annual Conference, but members may not vote again onsite if their vote has already been provided electronically or via a mailed ballot. Click here to learn about the candidates for office.

Voting will be made available for candidates who have consented to run for the following positions:
  • Vice President (1 person to be elected)
  • Directors of the Board (3 people to be elected)
  • Delegate (1 person to be elected)
  • Nominating Committee member (1 person to be elected)
Electronic voting: An email was sent to all members on Feb. 28, allowing you to vote using the electronic option. You would have received an email from southcarolina@apta.org. To vote, members will be required to include their APTA member ID before casting their votes. Otherwise, they will not be accepted.

Mailed ballots: If you wish to receive a mailed ballot, follow these links to download either the PT ballot or the PTA ballot. Mailed ballots must be received in the SCAPTA office with a postmark of no later than March 14, to be accepted.
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ByLaws: Article XII
SCAPTA
The ByLaws Committee under direction of the board of directors, moves that we amend Article XII: Finance to reflect an increase in dues for physical therapist members and physical therapy assistant members as reflected below.

ARTICLE XII: FINANCE

Section A: Fiscal Year

The fiscal year will run from Jan. 1 through Dec. 31.

Section B: Dues

Chapter dues are as follows:
Physical Therapist: One-hundred thirty dollars ($100 $130)
Physical Therapist/Post Professional Student: One-hundred dollars ($100)
Physical Therapist Assistant: Sixty Eighty dollars ($60 $80)
Life Physical Therapist: Zero dollars ($0)
Life Physical Therapist Assistant: Zero dollars ($0)
Student Physical Therapist and Student Physical Therapist Assistant: Five dollars ($5)
Retired Physical Therapist: Forty dollars ($40)
Retired Physical Therapist Assistant: Forty dollars ($40)
Corresponding members: Fifty dollars ($50)

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SCAPTA 2014 Annual Conference
SCAPTA
The SCAPTA 2014 Annual Conference is coming March 28-30 to Charleston. Registration is now open.


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Student develops intervention to reduce work-related shoulder injuries
Physical Therapy Products
Julie Collins, a Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College doctoral student, has developed a new intervention with mentorship from BU faculty and practitioners to help minimize workplace injury and decrease work-related injury costs. According to a Boston University College of Arts and Sciences news release, Collins worked with BU Sargent faculty physical therapists Lee Marinko and Kelly Pesanelli to implement a program of education and equipment modification specifically designed to address shoulder injuries.
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ACA and public health
ADVANCE
This article is not about the Affordable Care Act. It's not about policies or budgets or mandates, and it's certainly not about politics. It's about people. It's about public health. Of course, those are all aspects of healthcare, but there are multiple factors that contribute to being — and staying — healthy. Let's have a discussion.
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Navigating a career in physical therapy
Los Angeles Times
Business is set to boom for physical therapists. Employment in the sector is projected to grow 36 percent over the decade spanning 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This means an increase of around 73,500 jobs that currently pay a median of $79,860 per year.
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Ingredients for success
ADVANCE
Whether they're munching Cheerios or chocolate chip cookies, eating is a common childhood pursuit. For everyone, child and adult alike, "Feeding is one of the most important and complex tasks for daily living," said Pamela Modugno, occupational therapist, Bacharach Institute for Rehabilitation, Pomona, N.J.

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Posture and exercise: Key points for reducing neck and back pain in the sedentary worker
Advance for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine
Many people who sit for long periods of time have complaints of neck and back pain. Since gravity is constantly pulling down on our bodies, causing muscle imbalances throughout the neck and back, it's not hard to understand why people complain of discomfort.

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Re-imagining physical rehabilitation for seniors
Chicago Tribune
Seeking to enhance physical rehabilitation for patients, ManorCare in Highland Park, Ill., has recently installed a “virtual” rehabilitation system for aging adults in their therapy department. Called the OmniVRTM, this technology is making the rehabilitation process more fun and exciting for patients.

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New stem cell research may reveal insight into muscle repair, recovery
Physical Therapy Products
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have conducted a stem cell research study that sheds light on why normal aging is accompanied by a diminished ability to regain strength and mobility after a muscle injury. According to a Stanford University Medical Center news release, the scientists determined that over time, stem cells within muscle tissues dedicated to repairing damage become less able to generate new muscle fibers and struggler to self-renew.
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4 common injuries Olympians will be working on long after their return home
The Globe and Mail
The recent Olympic Games may be over, but many of the athletes who competed at Sochi will have a long road ahead of them recovering from their injuries. Some will never fully recover.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Managing the injured runner (By Heidi Dawson)
Effects of exercise on diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle in the antenatal and postnatal periods (Physiotherapy Journal)
Study: Does ethnicity, gender or age of physiotherapy students affect performance in the final clinical placements? (Physiotherapy Journal)
Posture and exercise: Key points for reducing neck and back pain in the sedentary worker (Advance for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Brief physical therapy improves symptoms, QoL in urinary incontinence
medwireNews via News-Medical.Net
A one-month program of physical therapy results in significant improvements in quality of life among women with urinary incontinence, a clinical trial has found. The study included 72 women with symptoms of stress urinary incontinence or mixed urinary incontinence. Their mean age was 53.1 years, 59.7 percent were postmenopausal and mean body mass index was 26.7.
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17 of the most specific, bizarre ICD-10 codes
By Charlotte Bohnett
Come October, healthcare professionals will go from using the library of 13,000 codes in ICD-9 to that of 68,000 in ICD-10. As The New York Times explains, the new code set "allows for much greater detail than the existing code [set], ICD-9, in describing illnesses, injuries and treatment procedures. That could allow for improved tracking of public health threats and trends, and better analysis of the effectiveness of various treatments."
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Relieving stress on healthcare
The Vancouver Sun
Physiotherapists believe they can play a role in reducing the pressure an aging population puts on Canada's healthcare system. "As demands on traditional healthcare increase leading up to 2035, I think physios are going to play a big role,” said physiotherapist Helen Ries, owner and manager of downtown Vancouver's Sitka Physio & Wellness. Physiotherapists are taking a more holistic approach to care that includes a greater variety of nontraditional treatments and innovative technology.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Nikki Trufant-Wade, Content Editor, 972.910.6810  
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