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Concerns about the ability to perform dry needling in South Carolina
SCAPTA
The South Carolina Physical Therapy Association (SCAPTA) has been made aware of a number of complaints that have been filed with the South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing, & Regulation against physical therapists related to the performance of dry needling. While dry needling is within the professional and legal scope of physical therapist practice in South Carolina, there is significant concern by SCAPTA about these complaints. Complaints have been filed against both members and non-members across the state. If you or someone you know have received a complaint regarding the practice of dry needling, we need to hear from you as soon as possible.

Please contact the SCAPTA Executive Director's office at (703) 706-3136 or southcarolina@apta.org. We need to hear from all clinicians across the state that have been contacted whether or not they are a member of the association. As your professional association SCAPTA continues to be an advocate for all PT's and PTA's in the state of South Carolina and we will be working quickly to develop resources and coordinate a response for individuals involved in this issue. For any further questions or concerns please communicate with SCAPTA leadership by contacting the SCAPTA Executive Director's office at southcarolina@apta.org (703) 706-3136.

Thank you for your dedication to the PT profession, and for your membership in SCAPTA.
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SCAPTA NEWS


Medicaid re-enrollment process begins
SCAPTA
At the Annual Meeting in Greenville a few weeks ago, we shared that South Carolina Medicaid is beginning a re-validation process. All therapists and group practices who are enrolled in the SC Medicaid program as providers will be asked to re-validate their credentials during this process. At this time, they are just beginning the process. Phase one has begun and includes Physical Therapy Group practices. Letters were mailed out on June 3 and practices on the list have until July 6 to respond.

Please go to this link: https://msp.scdhhs.gov/revalidation/site-page/group-1-deadline-july-6 and click on the link in the bottom paragraph that states: "To find out if you are a Group 1 provider, please refer to the Provider Revalidation Group 1 List." Search for your group practice. If your practice is on the list and has not received a letter with the revalidation code, contact the Medicaid office. If you do not respond to the re-validation request by the deadline, the group practice will be inactivated in the Medicaid system.

Individual physical therapists will be included in a different phase. It appears that phase one is specifically for group practices and facilities. Please contact the SC Medicaid office if you have questions.

– Robbie B Leonard, PT
Chair, SCAPTA Payment & Policy Committee

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Foundation opens Call for Scientific Review Committee Members
Foundation for Physical Therapy
The Foundation for Physical Therapy (Foundation) is accepting nominations from physical therapists interested in serving on the Foundation's Scientific Review Committee (SRC). This elite group of professionals is the peer review arm of the Foundation’s scholarship, fellowship, and grants programs. Members selected to serve on the SRC have significant practice in training pre- and postdoctoral students and mentoring emerging investigators, as well as strong track records of extramural funding and peer review experience at the federal level. Terms are for 3 years beginning January, 2016. Nominations must be submitted no later than August 1. For more information, including a full list of qualifications to serve on the SRC and instructions on submitting a CV, please visit the SRC webpage or contact Rachael Crockett.
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Save the Date for SCAPTA's Inaugural Moving Forward 5K Race
SCAPTA
Held by the South Carolina chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association (SCAPTA) to celebrate October National Physical Therapy Month and benefitting SCAPTA and partial proceeds towards Charleston's Achieving Wheelchair Equality (AWE).

Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015
9:00 a.m.
James Island County Park in Charleston, S.C.


Achieving Wheelchair Equality is a Charleston, S.C., organization that serves the wheelchair using community and mobility impaired population in order to become involved, productive members. They educate and increase awareness to others about accessible resources in our environment for those with mobility impairments whether it be with daily activities with peer support and direct services including building ramps or in participation in recreational activities such as the Lowcountry Wheelchair Sports including and not limited to basketball, tennis, racing with hand cycling, swimming, triathletes, and more!

Watch this page for more information regarding sponsorship opportunities and registration.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Make FES a Standard-of-Care Intervention, Maley lecturer says
APTA
"Why has it been so difficult for the medical and physical therapy communities to embrace FES as a standard of care?" This was the question posed by Gad Alon, PT, PhD, in his delivery of the 2015 John H. P. Maley Lecturer, as he urged physical therapists to make functional electrical stimulation (FES) "a standard-of-care intervention option in rehabilitation medicine," adopt a new practice model of "personalized rehabilitation programs," and embrace physical therapist–industry partnerships as a way to bring effective wearable therapeutic technologies to market quickly.
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6 things I wish anyone would have told me about being a PT
WebPT
I realized I wanted to be a physical therapist after experiencing — and rehabbing — a knee injury while playing collegiate basketball. But until I actually became a PT, I didn't understand what it really meant to practice physical therapy. A physical therapist not only treats a patient's injury; he or she treats the whole person. And if that PT is in private practice, he or she also is trying to run a business while staying on top of changing market conditions and compliance requirements. Put all that together, and it's like trying to pat your head, rub your stomach, and stand on a soapbox all at the same time. While I doubt anyone could have fully prepared me for the many facets of being a fully engaged PT, there are a few things I wish I.d known before entering the professional world.
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Active people suddenly experience frozen shoulder
MyCentralJersey.com
As we grow older, especially over the age of 40, we are seeing more and more patients coming to the office with a diagnosis of "frozen shoulder" or adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. People that have been active throughout their entire lives now all of the sudden can't lift their arm over their head or comb the back of their head or even brush their teeth because their shoulder is not functioning normally.
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Study: Music strategy shows 70 percent increase in exercise adherence
Today in PT
The use of personalized music playlists with tempo-pace synchronization increases adherence to cardiac rehab by almost 70 percent, according to a recent study. In the study, each participant’s personalized playlist was the music genre the person enjoyed with tempos matched to a predetermined walking or running pace. "The music tempo-pace synchronization helps cue the person to take their next step or stride and helps regulate, maintain and reinforce their prescribed exercise pace," Alter said in the release. He also is the research chairman in cardiovascular prevention and metabolic rehabilitation at Toronto Rehab.
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The exercises physical therapists know lead to injuries
DailyBurn via CNN
Week after week, studies come out about the benefits of exercise. And while online resources can inspire you in countess ways to get moving, you likely won't learn the correct way to squat or dead lift via YouTube. The monkey see, monkey do mentality could, in fact, be a recipe for disaster. "If you don't have enough mobility at each joint to perform an exercise safely, then really any part of the body is at risk for injury," says Alison McGinnis, DPT, FAFS. She's a physical therapist at Finish Line Physical Therapy in New York City.
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Some pediatric conditions can be helped with physical therapy
The Daily News
There are several conditions that can affect a newborn where physical therapy is a preferred method of treatment. Torticollis and brachial plexus injuries are two that may occur more frequently. Torticollis is a tightness in the neck, or a noticeable lump in the neck muscle, causing limitation in movement. Pain may or may not be present, depending on the type of torticollis. Congenital muscular torticollis affects infants and is generally diagnosed within the first two months.
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Some pediatric conditions can be helped with physical therapy
The Daily News
There are several conditions that can affect a newborn where physical therapy is a preferred method of treatment. Torticollis and brachial plexus injuries are two that may occur more frequently. Torticollis is a tightness in the neck, or a noticeable lump in the neck muscle, causing limitation in movement. Pain may or may not be present, depending on the type of torticollis. Congenital muscular torticollis affects infants and is generally diagnosed within the first two months.
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ICD-10 implementation: Examining the potential aftermath
FierceHealthIT
It's up to health information management leaders to help their facilities understand what to expect when the ICD-10 deadline hits Oct. 1, six months after that and beyond, according to an article published in the Journal of the American Health Information Management Association>. The article examines what doctors and hospitals can expect beyond October in three phases.
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Work-life balance in healthcare: Addressing the system
By Catherine Iste
Why is achieving work-life balance as a healthcare professional so difficult? As noted in the first part of this three-part series, it is difficult for everyone to agree on what work-life balance really is. As pointed out in the second article, many of the characteristics that draw a person into the profession are the same ones that keep them from addressing their own needs. In this article, we will acknowledge another seemingly obvious issue that fundamentally affects work-life balance: the system.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    5 common myths about the ICD-10 transition (HIT Consultant)
Study: Mobilization with movement can make a difference in shoulder impingement (PT in Motion)
4 ICD-10 fears decoded (MedpageToday)
Survey explores outpatient rehab practice efficiency (Physical Therapy Products)
Study of muscle mechanics could lead to better running 'blades' for amputees (Healio)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



 



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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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