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Support for students attending NSC
SCAPTA
SCAPTA has $500 available to support one or more students to attend APTA's National Student Conclave, which will be held Oct. 24–26 in Louisville, Ky. If you wish to be considered for funding, please provide your request to southcarolina@apta.org outlining the amount of funds you are requesting, how they will be used, why you are attending NSC, your name, contact information (include email) and the number of months/years of physical therapy education you've had to date. Your request is due no later than Oct. 1. Notifications will be disseminated by email to all applicants between Oct. 9 and 18.
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Risk Management Forum
SCAPTA
Join SCAPTA and the North Carolina Physical Therapy Association on Oct. 11 in beautiful Asheville, N.C., for our collaborative Risk Management Forum. This day is one among the three days of the North Carolina Chapter's fall conference. The Risk Management Forum will provide material relevant to physical therapists as well as occupational and speech therapists.
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Education Leadership Institute Fellowship accepting applications for 2014
APTA
APTA's Education Leadership Institute Fellowship — a collaborative with the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy, Education Section, Physical Therapist Assistant Educators Special Interest Group and APTA — is now accepting applications for 2014. Submission deadline is Dec. 20. This yearlong invitational blended learning fellowship program includes mentorship and is designed to develop emerging and novice physical therapist and physical therapist assistant education program directors with leadership skills to facilitate change, think strategically and engage in public discourse to advance the physical therapy profession.
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Final call for poster abstracts for NEXT Conference 2014
PT in Motion
The deadline is approaching to submit abstracts for poster presentations for APTA's NEXT Conference, to be held in Charlotte, N.C., June 11-14. Individuals may submit up to two abstracts as the presenting author; unlimited submissions are allowed as a secondary author. The deadline is Sept. 23.
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Support for students attending NSC
SCAPTA
SCAPTA has $500 available to support one or more students to attend APTA's National Student Conclave, which will be held Oct. 24–26 in Louisville, Ky. If you wish to be considered for funding, please provide your request to southcarolina@apta.org outlining the amount of funds you are requesting, how they will be used, why you are attending NSC, your name, contact information (include email) and the number of months/years of physical therapy education you've had to date. Your request is due no later than Oct. 1. Notifications will be disseminated by email to all applicants between Oct. 9 and 18.

5 truths about the doctor of physical therapy
PutMeBackTogether.com
Paul Killoran writes, "Ultimately, I don't anticipate everyone to hold hands and agree on all talking points, but there certainly seems to be a distinct 'Jets vs Sharks' rift in our physical therapy profession. That seems to be focused primarily on the DPT, at least the majority of the feedback focused on my assertions regarding my DPT." Here, he offers five truths about the physical therapy profession in the DPT debate.

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No workarounds: Following the rules of the therapy cap
By Heidi Jannenga
If you're like most rehab therapists, finding a letter from Medicare in your mailbox is enough to make your brow sweat and your heart skip a beat. With all of the regulations we have to follow — and the potential penalties associated with noncompliance — it's no surprise that we have grown to fear Medicare. Or in some cases, we're afraid of not getting paid. Thus, rather than defend our decisions, expertise and treatment plans, some of us look for ways to "game the system." One way therapists are doing this is working around the therapy cap to avoid having their exceptions rejected.

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Integrating pain science with MDT in your therapy practice
PutMeBackTogether.com
MDT gets criticized mainly for its overly simplistic, mechanistic approach and explanation that has been both proven and disproven for explaining the how's and why's of Derangement Syndrome. Even recent studies have shown repeated flexion and flexion loading increases posterior disc protrusions. Either way, MDT has been shown to be an excellent predictor of outcomes in regards to centralization and peripheralization. A recent study also found MDT to have better outcomes in the long term for lumbar pain patients compared to spinal manipulative therapy.
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Study: Ice baths don't ease soreness or improve strength
Omaha World-Herald
At Creighton University, several student athletes take ice baths regularly for sprains and strains and to help with soreness, said head athletic trainer Ben McNair. However, research from the University of New Hampshire recently published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology shows that the treatment may not be effective at all. The study was conducted between 2010 and 2011 with 20 active, college-aged men.
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How to keep patients focused during office visits
By Karen Childress
It's not unusual to hear patients complain about doctors who don't listen well. "He interrupts before I can get my whole story out," they'll say. But every practicing physician has been on the other end of this. You no doubt find yourself, from time to time, trapped in an exam room with a patient who goes on and on and on. Fortunately, there are some simple techniques to employ when this occurs. Consider these four scenarios.
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Industry Pulse: Which scenario is the most troublesome for you?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    No workarounds: Following the rules of the therapy cap (By Heidi Jannenga)
5 truths about the doctor of physical therapy (PutMeBackTogether.com)
8 things you need to know now about ICD-10 (By Charlotte Bohnett)
The great debate: Static vs. dynamic stretching (Advance for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine)
Risk Management Forum (SCAPTA)

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Dynamic visual acuity in military service members who are healthy
Journal of the American Physical Therapy Association
A study was conducted to investigate the effects of 26 hours of sleep deprivation on dynamic visual acuity as a surrogate for angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function. Results showed that dynamic visual acuity testing in soldiers who are healthy revealed no change in gaze stability after rapid yaw impulses and subclinical changes in pitch DVA after sleep deprivation. Findings suggest that DVA is not affected by short-term sleep deprivation under clinical conditions.
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Incorporating Pilates into practice
Advance for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine
Pilates-based physical therapy is an approach to healing grounded in the moving body, using the therapeutic movements and techniques of classical Pilates as well as traditional physical therapy interventions. Pilates-based physical therapists generally use Pilates as their main exercise modality, replacing more traditional exercise machines with Pilates equipment. PBPT is founded on the idea that a movement-oriented approach to PT can offer patients an opportunity to experience success with movement. When patients have a positive movement experience, a shift can occur in the perception that movement causes pain.
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Device to prevent sports injury
Taipei Times
A sports research team at National Taiwan Normal University has developed a device designed to help joggers avoid injuries by detecting and transmitting signs of fatigue from the body to mobile communication devices. The team, led by Department of Athletic Performance professor Hsiang Tzyy-yuang, found that the physical activity level of low-impact running can be estimated from the acceleration of the wrists, while the acceleration of ankles can be used to gauge the physical activity level of high-impact running. The fatigue produced by excessive exercise causes the runner's posture to change, which is the main cause of sports injuries.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Nikki Trufant-Wade, Content Editor, 972.910.6810  
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