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From battles to bubbles: Soldier starts underwater therapy
WMBF-TV via WISTV-TV
VideoBrief An IED explosion left a soldier with PTSD along with brain and back injuries. It also cost him his career in the military. Today, he is getting a second chance. Through the Veterans Benefits Foundation, medically retired staff sergeant Cliff Goble is the first disabled veteran to take part in a SCUBA Therapy Program on the East Coast. This program is being called "From Battles to Bubbles," and allows South Carolina veterans with PTSD, traumatic brain injuries and physical disabilities to be able to learn and be licensed in scuba diving.
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SCAPTA Upstate District meeting
SCAPTA Upstate District meeting
When: 6:45 p.m. Nov. 12

Where: Medical Staff Auditorium — Greenville Health System Main Campus, 701 Grove Rd, Greenville (Park in visitor parking lot in front of hospital. Auditorium is inside atrium to the left.)

Speaker: Jason Frisch

Topic: Orthotic Principles Applied to the Orthopedic Patient

Sponsor: Hanger Clinic

CEUs: One awarded to all SCAPTA members; $10 charge for all nonmembers wanting to receive CEU

If you are planning to attend, please reply to Holly or Trudy by 5 p.m. Nov. 8.



Building a bridge between oncology and physical therapy
Oncology Nurse Advisor
The power of physical therapy to improve the health and well-being of patients who have undergone treatment for cancer is practically undisputed. Cancer treatments take a toll on a patient's body in addition to the disease itself, so the eradication of cancer is not always the final step in a patient's recovery. Laurie Sweet, a clinical resource analyst at The Johns Hopkins Cancer Rehabilitation Program in East Baltimore, Md., describes physical therapy as the yin to cancer's yang and just as much a part of a cure for the disease as chemotherapy, radiation or surgery
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From battles to bubbles: Soldier starts underwater therapy
WMBF-TV via WISTV-TV
An IED explosion left a soldier with PTSD along with brain and back injuries. It also cost him his career in the military. Today, he is getting a second chance. Through the Veterans Benefits Foundation, medically retired staff sergeant Cliff Goble is the first disabled veteran to take part in a SCUBA Therapy Program on the East Coast. This program is being called "From Battles to Bubbles," and allows South Carolina veterans with PTSD, traumatic brain injuries and physical disabilities to be able to learn and be licensed in scuba diving.

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New rules that every therapist should know to lead their practice into a good profitability
PRWeb
Practitioners are the main people responsible for leading the company and demonstrating by example how the practice is to operate. Nitin Chhoda, a physical therapist and international marketing expert, recently released three new rules for practice owners to assist them in leading their practice toward a successful future.

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How physical therapists can walk the talk in their job
PutMeBackTogether.com
Son Trinh writes, "We spend most of the days in our job as a physical therapist just talking. The question is whether we 'walk the talk' or just open our mouths and let the hot air out, not thinking about how our advice applies to us as much as to improving our patient's health. We're making recommendations, prescribing exercise, describing diseases and what to do about them. There's lots of talking but how about showing?"

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Updated FLR guidelines address reporting on additional evaluative procedures
PT in Motion
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services updated its guidance on functional limitation reporting around reporting evaluative procedures that are for different limitations in addition to those currently being reported. The new guidance is included in the Frequently Asked Questions document on the CMS Therapy Services website and provides instructions on how to report these additional procedures and functional limitations while continuing to report on the primary limitations.
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4 crucial therapist resume questions hiring managers want to know
PutMeBackTogether.com
As a point of fact, hiring managers in healthcare only spend around 15 seconds perusing over a new resume of a therapist for the first time and they're really only looking for a couple of things when they do. They're on autopilot, for the most part. Here's what they want to know.
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Preventing ACL injuries in young female athletes
By Heidi Dawson
The risk of ACL injuries in female, teenage athletes is up to six times higher than in male athletes of the same age, competing in the same sports. That's a pretty scary statistic for adolescent females, their families and coaches alike. The consequences of such an injury can be huge — from a financial, physical and psychological standpoint — for both the short and long-term future of a young athlete. The average bill for surgery and pre- and post-operative care is estimated to be around the $20,000 mark. On top of the financial demand, research has shown that grades often drop, at least in the short-term and that girls are less likely to return to sports after such an injury.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How physical therapists can walk the talk in their job (PutMeBackTogether.com)
New rules that every therapist should know to lead their practice into a good profitability (PRWeb)
Many insured South Carolina residents being notified they'll need a new health plan in 2014 (The Republic)
Dance away the pain: Parkinson's patients improve mobility through exercise (NBC News)
APTA Virtual Career Fair (APTA)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Pediatric orthopedic conditions: A primer for physical therapists
PhysicalTherapy.com
Dr. Alicia Fernandez-Fernandez writes, "There is a reason why I titled this 'A Primer for Physical Therapists.' It is by no means an exhaustive exploration of orthopedic conditions because to do that I would have to have one lecture for each subject that we are going to talk about today. This is a great overview of pediatric orthopedic conditions that are important for you to be aware of when you are practicing pediatrics. The knowledge that you gain today, along with further exploration of some of the references I provide, will be useful to your practice in a pediatric environment."
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Step-speed enhancement can improve balance in the elderly
Advance for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine
Age-related changes such as a reduction in visual acuity, reduction in reflexive movements, postural changes, arthritis and loss of muscle mass can increase risk of falls in the elderly. There is a strong relationship with loss of muscle mass and strength, and age-related muscle loss is defined as sarcopenia. Step speed and initial recovery compensatory step shows to be a significant factor in withstanding the challenge of perturbation. Using a safety harness, a computer-controlled treadmill can be used to target performance of compensatory response. The risk of falling after the laboratory-induced trip response was reduced by 83 percent.
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Acupuncture in subacute stroke: No benefits detected
Journal of the American Physical Therapy Association
A study was designed to determine whether acupuncture combined with conventional physical therapy improves motor function and activities of daily living in patients with subacute stroke compared with conventional physical therapy alone. Results showed that no statistically significant differences were found at baseline between the groups. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups using the FMA motor scores and the BI scores at baseline or at one, three or six months. Significant improvements were found in each group following treatment.
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SCAPTA News

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Nikki Trufant-Wade, Content Editor, 972.910.6810  
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