This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Nov. 21, 2013

Home   About   Awards   Careers   Conference   Districts   Donations   Education   Join   PAC   Members   Contact Us  


 
Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, next week's edition of the SCAPTA News will be published on Wednesday, Nov. 27. Our regular publication will resume Dec. 5.

New South Carolina medical database could improve care, reduce costs
The State
A consortium of South Carolina's universities and hospital systems has started using a database with medical information on millions of patients statewide that they hope can develop better — and less expensive — treatment plans. The $15 million Clinical Data Warehouse is housed at Clemson University and operated by Health Sciences South Carolina in Columbia. Money for the project came from the Duke Endowment, which has given the group $31 million over the past decade.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Physical therapists try simulated knee surgery, robotically aided
The Columbian
As a group of physical therapists took turns at the operating table, their faces showed a combination of wonder, fascination and a bit of squeamishness. Each tried his or her hand during a demonstration knee surgery, performed on a cadaver leg. But it wasn't just human hands at work for this partial knee replacement. They worked with the guidance of a robotic arm that already knew where to go. Legacy Salmon Creek was the first hospital in the Portland, Ore., region to offer the robotic-assisted procedure — known as MAKOplasty — in 2009. It's still one of just three facilities in the Portland-Vancouver area using the technology. Borus himself has performed more than 500 such procedures.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New technology is helping practice owners add an industrial rehab service
Advance for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine
In response to decreased service reimbursement over recent years, physical and occupational therapy clinics are looking for ways to offset loss of revenue. Industrial rehabilitation is becoming a popular service addition to compensate for this loss. Implemented the right way, using the right technology for best results, industrial rehabilitation is a proven means for diversifying services and driving additional volume and revenue. Understanding the services involved in a successful industrial rehabilitation program and how best to use reliable technology for efficiency are key items to consider before making the decision to add industrial rehab services to your clinic's offerings.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
New South Carolina medical database could improve care, reduce costs
The State
A consortium of South Carolina's universities and hospital systems has started using a database with medical information on millions of patients statewide that they hope can develop better — and less expensive — treatment plans. The $15 million Clinical Data Warehouse is housed at Clemson University and operated by Health Sciences South Carolina in Columbia. Money for the project came from the Duke Endowment, which has given the group $31 million over the past decade.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
6 ways to convince patients to do a home exercise program
PutMeBackTogether.com
Son Trinh writes, "I once had a patient tell me he didn't want to do the home exercise program because it sounded like homework and he hated school, so he didn't want to do it. So there's a lesson for you. Don't remind your patients of school. Instead, try these ideas."

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Effects of physical therapy treatment: 20 minutes?
In Touch Physical Therapy
What if I told you that the neurophysiological effects of manual therapy are only 15-20 minutes. Meaning, 20 minutes at the max, no more. Surprising? What if I then told you that the same effects from our modalities — ultrasound, heat, laser, etc. — the ones we use for comfort but know there is no evidence of effectiveness, yield the same length of relief? Believe it or not, it's true.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Everything you need to know about the Medicare 8-minute rule
By Heidi Jannenga
Want to know what to bill to Medicare for outpatient therapy services (aka, the 8-minute rule)? First, there are two types of CPT codes you'll need to understand in order to bill properly: service- and time-based. And here's where the 8-minute rule comes in: In order to receive reimbursement from Medicare for a time-based code, you must provide direct treatment for at least eight minutes. The key to correct billing is doing the math.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Can physical therapy for rotator cuff tears prevent surgery?
MikeReinold.com
Rotator cuff repair surgery and postoperative rehabilitation continue to be some of the most debated topics on the shoulder at orthopedic and physical therapy conferences. Numerous studies have been published showing the failure rate of rotator cuff repair surgery ranges anywhere from 25-90 percent. While this failure rate is certainly alarming, the term "failure" must be defined. In traditional study models, success is defined as an intact rotator cuff, which makes sense. However, one of the more interesting findings in most of these studies is that despite the "failed" repair, most patients are quite satisfied with their functional status and outcome. This really does have to make you question how we define "failure" as patient outcomes and satisfaction seems more important than radiological findings.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


NIH-funded post-acute care study needs PTs
PT in Motion
A National Institutes of Health-funded study is looking for physical therapists with expertise with older adults in a post-acute care setting. Participation in the research, being conducted by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, will be compensated. Selected PTs would join a team of physicians, nurses and social workers to review case summaries on an interactive website to determine post-acute care referrals.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Effects of physical therapy treatment: 20 minutes? (In Touch Physical Therapy)
6 ways to convince patients to do a home exercise program (PutMeBackTogether.com)
4 crucial therapist resume questions hiring managers want to know (PutMeBackTogether.com)
Wheelchair seating tip sheet (Advance for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine)
Remote physical therapy anyone? (Nintin 360)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Webinar: 'Physical Therapy and PQRS in 2014 — How to Report Successfully'
APTA
Join Heather Smith from 2-3 p.m. EDT Dec. 19 for "Physical Therapy and PQRS in 2014 — How to Report Successfully," a webinar. This session will provide what you need to know about the physician quality reporting system for 2014, including program changes impacting physical therapists and provide practical approaches for participating. During the Q & A session following the presentation, you may ask your questions directly to the experts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Emerging trends in global health: Physical therapy/physiotherapy in disaster management
PhysioSpot
VideoBrief Once the immediate emergency is over and the television cameras and journalists have moved on there is still much work physical therapists can do in disaster zones to build for the future. There are four recognized aspects of disaster management and, of these, the recovery phase is where the role of physiotherapy is most recognized. However the profession also has the skills to make important contributions in the preparedness and relief phases.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Participation following knee replacement: The MOST cohort study
Journal of the American Physical Therapy Association
A study was conducted to investigate the extent and predictors of participation and participation restriction among people after total knee replacement. This study investigated the changes in pain, function and participation scores — measured using a subscale of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument — among a subsample of participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study longitudinal cohort.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 



SCAPTA News

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Nikki Trufant-Wade, Content Editor, 972.910.6810  
Contribute news


Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of the SCAPTA News was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

Recent issues

Nov. 14, 2013
Nov. 7, 2013
Oct. 31, 2013
Oct. 24, 2013






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063