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Expert groups clarify HPV testing recommendations
MedPage Today
Primary cervical cancer screening with a test for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA represents a reasonable and effective alternative to cytology or co-testing with cytology and the HPV assay, according to cooperative interim guidance recommendations. Primary HPV testing should begin at age 25 and continue at 3-year intervals so long as a patient remains HPV negative. Any patient who tests positive for HPV 16 or 18, the strains associated with most cervical cancers, should undergo colposcopy. A positive test for other HPV strains should be followed by reflex cytology.
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SGO NEWS


SGO Board of Directors and Foundation Council open election
The 2015 SGO Board of Directors and Foundation Council open election is now underway. All SGO members who are eligible to vote should have received an email from noreply@directvote.net on Monday, Jan. 12. The list of candidates for each position, including biographical information, personal statements and photos, is available for your consideration. Please take some time to review the candidates’ statements prior to casting your vote. Candidate information is also available on the ballot. Voting ends at 11:59 p.m. CST on Friday, Feb. 13.
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HPV


Screening HPV infection alone more accurate than Pap test in detection of cervical cancer
Medical Xpress
Screening for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection alone gives more accurate results than Pap (smear) testing for cervical cancer, say the authors of two papers to published Jan. 8 in the journal Gynecologic Oncology. HPV infection causes almost all cervical cancer, and it is estimated that more than half of sexually active people are infected with HPV at some point in their lives. Now new research has shown that in many cases, an HPV test alone can be used for cervical cancer screening instead of a Pap or cotesting with both an HPV and a Pap test, the researchers say.
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OVARIAN CANCER


Brisbane researchers help discover six new gene variations that increase ovarian cancer risk
ABC Online
A worldwide research project led by Brisbane researchers has uncovered six new gene variations that increase a woman's risk of ovarian cancer. The QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute and the University of Cambridge findings take the number of known ovarian cancer gene regions from 12 to 18. They studied more than 70,000 women from 30 countries as part of the project.
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Ovarian cancer: New measure of benefit proposed
Medscape (Free login required)
For patients with ovarian cancer who are in remission, the probability of remaining disease-free improves considerably over time, and conditional disease-free survival might be a good estimate of prognosis for these patients, according to a new study. The study, which was published in the December issue of Journal of Clinical Oncology, is the first to look at conditional disease-free survival in patients with ovarian cancer.
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TREATMENT


Deciphering the 'clinical meaning' of 'abnormal' nonspecific blood-based tumor markers
Clinical Oncology
Tumor markers in the blood of cancer patients play an important role in the management of multiple malignancies, but the documented utility of these biological factors varies greatly. For example, increases above the normal range for the tumor markers routinely followed in both men and women with a documented germ cell tumor (β-hCG and α-fetoprotein) are recognized in most settings as an indication of progression of the malignant process requiring intervention. Furthermore, the tests are considered so sensitive and specific in their prediction of future events that the initiation or modification of treatment is not considered to require any additional confirmation.
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LYNCH SYNDROME


Small bowel cancer: Scoping out a rarity
Medscape (Free login required)
In an interview with Medscape, Michael J. Overman, MD, an associate professor in the Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, discusses the most common predisposing factors for small bowel adenocarcinoma; the importance of diagnosing unexplained iron deficiency anemia, especially coupled with abdominal pain or gastrointestinal bleeding; and ongoing trials that are evaluating new therapeutic options for this disease.
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BREAST CANCER


Less toxic breast cancer regimen deemed successful
MedPage Today
Patients with small, node-negative, HER2-positive breast cancers had a 3-year survival approaching 100 percent with adjuvant paclitaxel and trastuzumab (Herceptin), a multicenter, prospective trial showed. The 406 patients included in the study had 3-year invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) of 98.7 percent. After excluding contralateral HER2-negative recurrences and nonbreast cancers, investigators identified seven disease-specific recurrences. Safety results were generally good, as relatively few patients had grade 3 peripheral neuropathy, heart failure, or asymptomatic declines in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as reported online in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202-684-7169  
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