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Plasma thermogram can serve as an indicator of cervical cancer
News-Medical.net
Researchers at the University of Louisville have confirmed that using the heat profile from a person's blood, called a plasma thermogram, can serve as an indicator for the presence or absence of cervical cancer, including the stage of cancer. The team, led by Nichola Garbett, Ph.D., published its findings online in PLOS ONE.
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PREVENTION


Obamacare to cover breast cancer prevention drugs
The Huffington Post
Certain medications that are intended to prevent breast cancer will be fully covered under Obamacare, in new guidance set to be issued by the Department of Health and Human Services Thursday morning. Women at increased risk of breast cancer can receive so-called chemoprevention drugs, including tamoxifen and raloxifene, without a co-pay or other out-of-pocket expense.
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Diet and exercise: cancer benefits in huge study of women's health
Medical News Today
In a large study of women's health, postmenopausal women who followed a healthy lifestyle were at a third lower risk of death, including a 20 percent smaller chance of dying from cancer, than women who did not follow guidance on diet, weight, physical activity and alcohol intake. "While it is well recognized that tobacco cessation is the lead behavioral change to reduce cancer risk," the authors write, they analyzed the effect of other cancer prevention recommendations.
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Diets heavy in meat boost risk for certain cancers
Medscape (Free login required)
A new multicountry study provides more evidence that certain dietary and lifestyle factors can increase the risk of developing cancer. Results from the study, published in the January issue of Nutrients, show that smoking and diets rich in animal products have the strongest correlations with cancer incidence rates. The strongest correlation with animal products was seen in cancers of the female breast, corpus uteri, kidney, ovaries, pancreas, prostate, testicles, and thyroid, and in multiple myeloma.
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Ovarian cancer screening has more 'harms' than 'benefit'
Ob. Gyn. News
Ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the United States. The poor survival rate associated with ovarian cancer is largely because of the advanced stage of the cancer at the time of diagnosis in the majority of patients. As with other cancers, survival is significantly increased when ovarian cancer is detected at an early stage.
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OBESITY


How being heavy or lean shapes our view of exercise
The New York Times
Overweight women's brains respond differently to images of exercise than do the brains of leaner women, a sophisticated new neurological study finds, suggesting that our attitudes toward physical activity may be more influenced by our body size than has previously been understood.
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SGO NEWS


New FIGO ovarian cancer staging guidelines
SGO
The International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) has revised the staging of ovarian cancer. The approved, new ovarian cancer staging went into effect on Jan. 1, 2014.
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Annual Meeting early bird registration deadline Jan. 20
SGO
Save $175 by registering for SGO's 45th Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer on or before Jan. 20. View the full list of member and nonmember rates and register online. Residents, students, senior and honorary members, and advocates are exempt from early bird pricing. The meeting runs March 22-25, 2014, in Tampa, FL.
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Content Editor, 469.420.2692  
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New Mexico ruling will allow doctors to help patients die
ABC News
Aja Riggs has undergone aggressive radiation and chemotherapy treatment for advanced uterine cancer. The 49-year-old Santa Fe resident remembers the feeling of her skin burning, all the medication, the nausea and the fatigue so immense that even talking sapped too much energy. All she wanted was the choice to end her life if the suffering became too great. She has that option now thanks to a New Mexico judge's landmark ruling, which clears the way for competent, terminally ill patients to seek their doctors' help in getting prescription medication if they want to end their lives on their own terms.
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