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Prognostic POLE proofreading may reduce overtreatment of endometrial cancer
Healio
POLE proofreading mutations may be independently prognostic for endometrial cancer and could help reduce overtreatment, according to data from a European study. Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy in the world, and its incidence is on the rise due to increased obesity and aging in the general population, according to the study background. Most cases (80 percent) are detected at an early stage because it tends to be a symptomatic disease.
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SGO NEWS


SGO Board of Directors and Foundation Council open election
The 2015 SGO Board of Directors and Foundation Council open election is now under way. All SGO members who are eligible to vote should have received an email from noreply@directvote.net on Monday, Jan. 12. The list of candidates for each position, including biographical information, personal statements and photos, is available for your consideration. Please take some time to review the candidates’ statements prior to casting your vote. Candidate information is also available on the ballot. Voting ends at 11:59 p.m. CST on Friday, Feb. 13.
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ENDOMETRIAL CANCER


Wait times do not affect survival in endometrial cancer
Medscape (Free login required)
Longer wait times between endometrial biopsy and surgical staging do not compromise prognosis in women with type I endometrial cancer, with the possible exception of those with more aggressive underlying disease. This finding comes from a retrospective study published online Jan. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.
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RESEARCH


Researchers open 'Pandora's box' of potential cancer biomarkers
Science Daily
A new analysis opens the door to discovery of thousands of potential new cancer biomarkers. Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed the global landscape of a portion of the genome that has not been previously well-explored — long non-coding RNAs. This vast portion of the human genome has been considered the dark matter because so little is known about it. Emerging new evidence suggests that lncRNAs may play a role in cancer and that understanding them better could lead to new potential targets for improving cancer diagnosis, prognosis or treatment.
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OVARIAN CANCER


Ovarian cancer oncolytic vaccine receives positive reviews
Vaccine News
The European Medicines Agency’s (EMA) Committee for Orphan Medical Products (COMP) recently gave a positive review of enadenotucirev to treat platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Also known as ColoAd1, the oncolytic vaccine is in the Phase I/II testing stage to determine its efficacy and safety. Test subjects include ovarian cancer patients throughout the United Kingdom. Two other clinical studies of enadenotucirev are taking place in Europe. These studies are testing the drug’s effectiveness against bladder cancer, colorectal cancer, renal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer.
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PERSPECTIVE


Random chance's role in cancer
The New York Times
Unlike Ebola, flu or polio, cancer is a disease that arises from within — a consequence of the mutations that inevitably occur when one of our 50 trillion cells divides and copies its DNA. Some of these genetic misprints are caused by outside agents, chemical or biological, especially in parts of the body — the skin, the lungs and the digestive tract — most exposed to the ravages of the world. But millions every second occur purely by chance — random, spontaneous glitches that may be the most pervasive carcinogen of all.
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LEADERSHIP


OB/GYN leadership lacks gender diversity
HealthDay News via The Clinical Advisor
Female providers are underrepresented in leadership roles in obstetrics and gynecology, results of a study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology suggest. To characterize the cohort of clinicians who may become senior leaders in the obstetrics and gynecology field, Lisa Hofler, MD, MPH, of Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues conducted an observational study in which they collected data from U.S. obstetrics and gynecological programs accredited in 2012 through 2013. The investigators examined the gender and subspecialty of faculty in leadership roles.
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BREAST CANCER


SOFT already informing choices in HR+ breast cancer
Medscape (Free login required)
Investigators from the International Breast Cancer Study Group studied the additional value of adding ovarian suppression to tamoxifen endocrine therapy for premenopausal women. They randomly assigned 3066 women with early-stage hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer, who were premenopausal at diagnosis or at completion of adjuvant chemotherapy, to receive 5 years of: (1) endocrine therapy with tamoxifen alone, (2) ovarian suppression plus tamoxifen, or (3) ovarian suppression plus the aromatase inhibitor exemestane.
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Next-gen sequencing: A new tool in identifying rare breast tumor mutations
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Scientists at the University of Michigan’s Comprehensive Cancer Center have uncovered genetic markers in a rare type of breast cancer called phyllodes tumors by wielding a powerful new tool in the molecular diagnostics arsenal: next-generation sequencing. This investigation of gene alterations, a first for phyllodes tumors, was published in journal Molecular Cancer Research under the title, “Next-Gen Sequencing Exposes Frequent MED12 Mutations and Actionable Therapeutic Targets in Phyllodes Tumors.”
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202-684-7169  
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