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FDA grants breakthrough therapy designation to rucaparib for advanced ovarian cancer
Healio
The FDA granted breakthrough therapy designation to rucaparib as monotherapy for patients with advanced ovarian cancer, according to a press release from the drug’s manufacturer. Rucaparib (Clovis Oncology) is an oral, small-molecule PARP inhibitor developed for the treatment of platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, specifically in patients with tumors that have BRCA mutations and other DNA deficiencies commonly referred to as “BRCA-like.”
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SGO NEWS


Gynecologic Oncology addresses universal testing for Lynch syndrome
“Impact of an immunohistochemistry-based universal screening protocol for Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancer on genetic counseling and testing” by Antonina I. Frolova, MD, PhD, and colleagues is the lead article of the April issue of Gynecologic Oncology. Karen H. Lu, MD, and Kari L. Ring, MD, wrote the accompanying editorial, “One size may not fit all: The debate of universal tumor testing for Lynch syndrome.”
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OVARIAN CANCER


New recommendations for ovarian cancer prevention
Cancer Therapy Advisor
Recommendations for prevention of ovarian cancer include oral contraceptive use and tubal sterilization, as well as genetic counseling and testing for women from high-risk families, according to a report from the Society of Gynecologic Oncology published in Cancer.
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Controversial IP route trumps IV chemo for ovarian cancer
Medscape (Free login required)
For patients with advanced ovarian cancer, the survival advantage is better with intraperitoneal (IP) than with intravenous (IV) chemotherapy, according to long-term results published online March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. However, one of the longest running controversies in gynecologic oncology — IP vs IV — is not settled yet. It is not clear that it is the IP route that is making the difference, and IP administration is more toxic, expensive, and complex, write the authors of an accompanying editorial.
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GENETICS


BRCA cancer risk differs with type and location of mutations
Medscape (Free login required)
Certain types of mutation in specific parts of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes can alter the risk for breast or ovarian cancer, according to results from a study published in the April 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). "The study results fit in with the spectrum of precision medicine," said first author Timothy R. Rebbeck, PhD.
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CERVICAL CANCER


HPV-targeted T cells may be effective for metastatic cervical cancer
Cancer Therapy Advisor
Durable, complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer can occur after a single infusion of human papillomavirus (HPV)-targeted tumor-infiltrating T cells (HPV-TILs), a new study published online this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology has shown. For the study, researchers sought to evaluate the effect of adoptive t-cell therapy on regression of metastatic cervical cancer.
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Robot matches open surgery for cervical cancer
MedPage Today
Robotic and open hysterectomy achieved similar disease control and survival in early cervical cancer, but robotic procedures led to significantly fewer complications and blood loss, a retrospective comparison of more than 500 cases showed. The two procedures had identical 9 percent recurrence rates after adjustment for a 10-month longer follow-up for the open procedures. Mortality was 3 percent in patients who underwent robotic radical hysterectomy and 4 percent in the patients who had open radical hysterectomy.
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HEALTH POLICY


The condition cancer research is in
The New York Times
In a letter to colleagues announcing his departure as the director of the National Cancer Institute, Dr. Harold Varmus, 75, quoted Mae West. “I’ve been rich and I’ve been poor,” he wrote, “and rich is better.” The line was characteristic of Dr. Varmus: playful and frank, not what one might expect from a Nobel laureate. But it also distilled a central question facing biomedical research today. Is the decline in funding that has shaken universities and research labs here to stay? If so, what does that mean for scientific research?
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The healing power of your own medical records
The New York Times
Steven Keating’s doctors and medical experts view him as a citizen of the future. A scan of his brain eight years ago revealed a slight abnormality — nothing to worry about, he was told, but worth monitoring. And monitor he did, reading and studying about brain structure, function and wayward cells, and obtaining a follow-up scan in 2010, which showed no trouble.
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202-684-7169  
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