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  Mobile version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit           Jun. 19, 2013

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AMA recognizes obesity as a disease
The New York Times
The American Medical Association has officially recognized obesity as a disease, a move that could induce physicians to pay more attention to the condition and spur more insurers to pay for treatments. In making the decision, delegates at the association's annual meeting in Chicago overrode a recommendation against doing so by a committee that had studied the matter.
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RESEARCH


Experimental drug shows promise in treating breast, ovarian cancer
The Canadian Press
A team of Canadian and U.S. researchers has developed a new "sharp-shooter" drug they hope may be a breakthrough in treating several types of aggressive cancer. The drug, known for now as CFI-400945, is a new class of cancer agent that targets an enzyme involved in some malignancies, among them certain types of breast cancer, and ovarian, colorectal, pancreatic and prostate cancers.
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Duloxetine reduces chemo-induced reripheral neuropathy pain
JAMA via Clinical Oncology News
Duloxetine reduced the pain associated with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and may lead to improved quality of life for patients with this painful disorder, a study has concluded. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III crossover trial, conducted through eight National Cancer Institute–funded research networks, tested the efficacy of this treatment.
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New endpoints proposed for chemotherapy in ovarian cancer
Medscape Today
Quality of life and symptom benefit should be accepted by clinicians and regulators as additional coprimary endpoints in clinical trials of chemotherapies for platinum-resistant and refractory ovarian cancer, according to a group of experts. These measures are "the most important aims of treatment" in these patients because improvements in overall and progression-free survival have hit a ceiling in trial after trial of chemotherapies, say Michael Friedlander, M.D., and colleagues from the Prince of Wales Hospital, in New South Wales, Australia.
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Testosterone therapy improves sexual function after uterus and ovary removal
Medical Xpress
High doses of testosterone significantly improve sexual function among women who have had their uterus and ovaries surgically removed, a clinical study demonstrates. The results were presented Sunday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.
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Cancer metastasis: Researchers find 'chase and run' mechanism in cancer spread
The Huffington Post
Scientists have identified the mechanism by which cancer is able to spread throughout the body, after discovering a cell movement process called "chase and run." The findings, published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, detail how neural crest cells, which are similar to cancer cells, "chase" placode cells, which are equivalent to healthy cells, when they are placed next to each other. In turn, the placode cells "run away."
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Journal claims drug war blocking potential treatments for cancer, Alzheimer's
TIME
Potential treatments for Alzheimer's disease, cancer and many other illnesses are being blocked by anti-drug laws, according to a new editorial review published in Nature Reviews Neuroscience. Lead author David Nutt, chair of neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London, and his colleagues argue that tight restrictions on research on illegal drugs like marijuana and “legal highs” are hindering progress in neuroscience and deterring drug companies from pursuing important leads in major disorders affecting millions of patients.
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BUSINESS


Amgen ovarian cancer drug meets goal of late-stage study
Bloomberg
Amgen Inc., the world's largest biotechnology company by sales, said its experimental drug for recurrent ovarian cancer met a late-stage study goal, helping patients live 1.8 months longer without the disease progressing. Patients taking trebananib plus the chemotherapy paclitaxel lived a median 7.2 months without their cancer advancing, compared with 5.4 months in the group on paclitaxel alone. The company expects data on overall survival, an important measure of a drug's effectiveness, in 2014.
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Supreme Court ruling on gene patenting may be a boon for biotech startups
TechCrunch
Buried in the ongoing PRISM debacle, there was actually some hopeful news out of Washington D.C. for startups. The Supreme Court ruled that naturally occurring genes can’t be patented, which should be a boon for the host of emerging gene testing and patenting companies that are coming out of the Valley. Silicon Valley VCs like Founders Fund, Khosla Ventures, Felicis Ventures and SV Angel have been making more bets in the space, on the assumption that biology is becoming a space that can be attacked by software.
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PREVENTION


New survey reveals how women view diet and exercise in relationship to cancer
News-Medical.net
The lifetime risk for cancer is greater than 1 in 3 for women in the U.S., but most women do not make the lifestyle choices recommended by the American Cancer Society to reduce that risk and prevent cancer. A multifaceted new survey determined how women view diet and exercise in relationship to cancer and whether they believe they are engaging in healthy behaviors, and whether their diet and exercise choices really meet the minimum recommendations.
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Study: Talcum powder elevates the risk of ovarian cancer
Science World Report
Talcum powder also known as talc is mainly used by women to remain fresh and active. The practice of discreetly dabbing talcum powder near the genital area as a hygiene regime might put one at a greater risk of ovarian cancer. According to a latest study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, those women who regularly use talcum powder are nearly a quarter more likely to suffer the risk of being diagnosed of ovarian cancer.
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