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Endometrial cancer guideline: ASCO endorses ASTRO doc
Medscape (Free login required)
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has endorsed a clinical practice guideline on postoperative radiation therapy for women with endometrial (uterine) cancer that was developed and published by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). ASCO has determined that the recommendations in the ASTRO guideline are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. They outline therapeutic interventions that both societies agree should be the standard of care for women with endometrial cancer. The endorsement was published online July 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. An SGO editorial accompanied the ASTRO guideline when it was published in Practical Radiation Oncology.
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CODING


AMA gets on board with ICD-10 after CMS eases rules
MedCity News
In an ICD-10 codes move that should signify that there will be no further surprise delays to the switch to ICD-10 coding, the American Medical Association has publicly expressed support for newly announced flexibility in enforcement of the rules. This news came in concert with the release of new guidance from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that has the AMA’s blessing.
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SGO Connect Ed to offer two coding webinars
With the implementation of the ICD-10 set for Oct. 1, SGO Connect Ed will present two coding webinars: “Preparing for the Storm: Understanding the Fundamentals of ICD-10-CM for GYN Oncology,” on July 22 at 7 p.m. ET/6 p.m. CT and “The Storm is Here: ICD-10-CM Codes and Case Studies for GYN Oncology,” on Sept. 30 at 7 p.m. ET/6 p.m. CT. The registration cost is $150 for members, $175 for non-members, and each live webinar will be available for on-demand viewing one day after the original webcast.
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OVARIAN CANCER


Scientists find genetic variants key to understanding origins of mucinous ovarian cancer
Medical Xpress
New research by an international team including Keck Medicine of USC scientists is bringing the origins of ovarian cancer into sharper focus. The study, published online June 15 in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Genetics, highlights the discovery of three genetic variants associated with mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs), offering the first evidence of genetic susceptibility in this type of ovarian cancer. The research also suggests a link between common pathways of development between MOCs and colorectal cancer and for the first time identifies a gene called HOXD9, which turns genes on and off, and provides clues about the development of MOCs.
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Protein in ovarian cancers deactivates immune system response
Cancer Network
One reason ovarian cancer is so deadly: it turns off immune cells that try to fight it. A Weill Cornell Medical College team has found that disarming a gene called XBP1 rearms immune cells — which successfully combat ovarian cancer. In the journal Cell, the team reported that ovarian cancer, in later, liquified stages, oozes about inside the body, creating a toxic tumor microenvironment rife with damaging, reactive oxygen molecules.
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Body size not a factor in ovarian ca dosing: Relative dose intensity had stronger link to survival
MedPage Today
Body size should not be a major factor influencing decisions about dose reduction in women with ovarian cancer, a retrospective analysis of an administrative database showed. Although the strongest predictor of dose reduction was a high body mass index, the study, published online in JAMA Oncology, showed that relative dose intensity was an independent predictor of ovarian cancer mortality.
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ENDOMETRIAL CANCER


Association between genetic condition, hormonal factors, and risk of endometrial cancer
Medical Xpress
For women with Lynch syndrome, an association was found between the risk of endometrial cancer and the age of first menstrual cycle, having given birth, and hormonal contraceptive use, according to a study in the July 7 issue of JAMA. Lynch syndrome is a genetic condition that increases the risk for various cancers.
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BREAST CANCER


Breast cancer and mammograms: Study suggests 'widespread overdiagnosis'
The Washington Post
The importance of regular mammograms to ending breast cancer has been widely endorsed by everyone from a government-backed panel to patient advocacy groups and Angelina Jolie. Is it possible they've all been wrong? A new study in JAMA Internal Medicine looked at data from 16 million women in 547 U.S. counties in 2000. More than 53,000 were diagnosed with breast cancer that year. As expected, the researchers found that the number of breast cancer diagnoses rose with more aggressive screenings. The surprise: the number of deaths remained the same.
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Excellent outcomes with partial-breast irradiation
Medscape (Free login required)
An accelerated 1-week regimen of partial-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery looks to be as effective as whole-breast irradiation, according to results from a retrospective analysis of more than 1000 women, published online April 28 in the Annals of Surgical Oncology. Women treated with a 1-week course of adjuvant accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) after lumpectomy had long-term outcomes similar to what would be expected with the standard 5- to 7-week course of whole-breast irradiation, according to Mitchell Kamrava, MD.
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Women's Cancer News
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