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Largest cancer gene database made public
Fox News
National Cancer Institute scientists have released the largest-ever database of cancer-related genetic variations, providing researchers the most comprehensive way so far to figure out how to target treatments for the disease. Open access worldwide to the new database, based on genome studies, is expected to help researchers accelerate development of new drugs and better match patients with therapies, NCI said in a statement.
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PREVENTION


Women with disabilities less likely to be screened for cancer
Toronto Star
Women with disabilities are significantly less likely to be screened for cancer than their able-bodied counterparts, yet are more prone to certain cancers, a new report shows. Physical barriers are only part of the problem. Attitudinal and procedural issues have an equally negative impact on women with disabilities and women who are deaf, says the report's author, Doris Rajan.
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Is protecting children from cancer un-American?
The Hill
By SGO President Barbara A. Goff, MD — I am a gynecologic cancer surgeon and too often I have had to do radical surgery to treat cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly cervical cancer. And in so many of these cases, I have had to inform families that there is nothing more I can do for their mom, wife or daughter. No family wants to experience this. I certainly don’t. That's why I've had my teenage daughter vaccinated against HPV. Because I've seen the often tragic effects of HPV, it was an easy decision. My teenage son also has received the vaccine, as recommended by the Food and Drug Administration, to reduce his risk of HPV-related cancer. Sadly, we're in the minority.
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Why are universities trying to limit access to breast cancer tests?
The Washington Post
When the Supreme Court ruled that you couldn't patent human genes, Ambry Genetics began offering women a test for the BRCA genes, which are linked to breast cancer. But last week, Myriad Genetics, the firm that has enjoyed a de facto monopoly on BRCA tests in recent years, sued. Myriad is the lead plaintiff, but two universities also signed on to the lawsuit: the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Utah Research Foundation. These schools own BRCA-related patents, which they have licensed exclusively to Myriad. Why are universities trying to force a potentially life-saving cancer test off the market?
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CLINICAL TRIALS


Do clinical trials work?
The New York Times
Every spring, some 30,000 oncologists, medical researchers and marketers gather in an American city to showcase the latest advances in cancer treatment. But at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, much of the buzz surrounded a study that was anything but a breakthrough.
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Novel combo of drugs shows promise in ovarian cancer
Medscape (Free login required)
In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, the combination of the oral antiangiogenic cediranib and the oral poly polymerase inhibitor olaparib showed promising activity in patients with ovarian cancer, with manageable toxic effects. The data are very early, but the combination achieved a 61 percent clinical benefit rate in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. However, the combination's activity was not as strong in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.

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RESEARCH


Most popular ovarian cancer cell lines do not resemble ovarian cancer
Medical Xpress
Researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center recently discovered that the most frequently used cancer cell lines in ovarian cancer research are not suitable models of ovarian cancer. Their findings are the result of a detailed review of genomic data that recently became publicly available.
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Past colon cancer tied to future cancer risks
Reuters
People who have had colon cancer are 15 percent more likely to be diagnosed with another cancer than those with no history of the disease, a new study suggests. Using data from cancer registries from nine states, researchers found small intestine, lung, kidney, stomach, bladder and endometrial cancers were all more common among people with a history of colon cancer.
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Researchers discover how BRCA mutation starts breast, ovarian cancers
ScienceDaily
Scientists led by Drs. Mona Gauthier and Tak Mak at The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have solved a key piece in the puzzle of how BRCA1 gene mutations specifically predispose women to breast and ovarian cancers. The answer, says Dr. Mak in research published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, is found in the way estrogen rushes in to "rescue" cells whose healthy functioning has been altered by oxidative stress, a well-established factor in cancer development.
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The possible cancer toll of CT scans
The New York Times
Each year more than four million CT scans are performed on children, and they are increasing the risk for future cancer, a new study suggests. Researchers writing online in JAMA Pediatrics counted the number of CT scans performed on children under 15 from 1996 to 2010 in seven American healthcare systems, and calculated the average dose of radiation delivered to the head, abdomen, chest or spine.
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