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Unsuspected gene found frequently mutated in endometrial, colorectal cancers
Medical Xpress
Scientists say they have identified in about 20 percent of colorectal and endometrial cancers a genetic mutation that had been overlooked in recent large, comprehensive gene searches. With this discovery, the altered gene, called RNF43, now ranks as one of the most common mutations in the two cancer types. Reporting in the Oct. 26, edition of Nature Genetics, investigators said the mutated gene helps control an important cell-signaling pathway, Wnt, that has been implicated in many forms of cancer.
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SGO NEWS


Early bird registration for Annual Meeting opens Monday
Registration for the 2015 Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer will open on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014. The deadline for early registration pricing is Monday, Jan. 26, 2015.
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CLINICAL TRIAL ENDPOINTS


The slippery slope (Part 1): Is a surrogate endpoint evidence of efficacy?
MedPage Today
Like the others in the clinical trial, Patient No. 11561004 already had tried other treatments for his advanced kidney cancer, but those didn't work. So the 69-year-old man volunteered to try an unproven drug that offered some hope he might live longer. Less than 4 months after starting the novel drug, axitinib (Inlyta), the man — identified only by age and a number in an FDA review of the clinical trial — developed severe abdominal pain, was admitted to the hospital, and died that day from gastrointestinal bleeding.
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The slippery slope (Part 2): Risks and confusion
MedPage Today
When the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the colorectal cancer drug panitumumab (Vectibix) in 2006, it put doctors and patients in a vexing position. The $10,000-a-month drug was allowed on the market because it appeared to slow the growth of cancer by 36 days when compared with chemotherapy alone in a randomized open-label trial. But there was no proof that patients who got the drug lived any longer.
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OVARIAN CANCER


Hospice increase doesn't offset end-of-life care for ovarian cancer
HealthDay News via Oncology Nurse Advisor
Increasing use of hospice in the final days of ovarian cancer does not offset intensive end-of-life care in older women, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Alexi A. Wright, MD, from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues examined changes in medical care during the last month of life over time for 6,956 individuals (aged ≥66 years) enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare. Patients were diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 1997 and 2007, and died as a result of ovarian cancer by December 2007.
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Olaparib tablet shows promise in pretreated ovarian cancer
HemOncToday
Oral olaparib tablets combined with a weekly regimen of carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe for use in patients with advanced ovarian cancer who have failed to respond to first-line therapy, according to early preliminary data presented at the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research-AACR 10th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium in September. The study was funded by the Dulien Fund and AstraZeneca. “This treatment regimen provided a response rate of 66 percent in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, said researcher Saul Rivkin, MD.
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SURVIVORSHIP


Cancer survivors struggle with work, money problems
MedPage Today
A third of cancer survivors reported financial or work-related hardships that persisted well beyond treatment of their disease, a survey of 1,600 survivors showed. One in four (27 percent) survey participants reported high debt, bankruptcy, and other financial difficulties, and 37 percent of the patients said they had to modify work plans, which included extended periods of leave and delayed retirement.
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NUTRITION


Tea and citrus products could lower ovarian cancer risk, UEA research finds
Health Canal
A study to be published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition on Nov. 1 reveals that women who consume foods containing flavonols and flavanones (both subclasses of dietary flavonoids) significantly decrease their risk of developing epithelial ovarian cancer. The research team studied the dietary habits of 171,940 women aged between 25 and 55 for more than three decades. Data was derived from the Nurses’ Health Study.
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202-684-7169  
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