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New drug extends life in women with advanced ovarian cancer
Medical Xpress
Women with ovarian cancer that has returned after previous treatment had their life extended by almost three months after treatment with a drug called Cediranib, according to trial results presented today at the National Cancer Research Cancer Conference in Liverpool. The Cancer Research UK-funded phase III clinical trial found that patients given Cediranib with chemotherapy gained an extra 3.2 months before their cancer progressed. And, on average, women survived for an extra three months, compared to women only given chemotherapy.
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HPV


HPV vaccine: One dose may be enough
NBCNEWS.com
A single dose of the human papillomavirus vaccine may be enough to protect women against infection with the virus over the long-term, a new study from Costa Rica suggests. In the study, women who received one, two, or the standard three doses of the HPV vaccine all produced antibodies against the virus that remained at stable levels in their bodies for four years after vaccination.
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HPV testing: Greater protection against cervical cancer
Medscape (Free login required)
The future of cervical abnormality detection, and thus the prevention of invasive cancers, lies in testing for human papillomavirus, rather than the more established cytology screening, according to the largest study to date. In fact, HPV screening appears to offer 60 percent to 70 percent greater protection against invasive cervical cancer than cytology. The study results were published online Nov. 2 in the Lancet.
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GENETICS


Female hormones key to breast and ovarian cancer in BRCA mutation carriers
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Women with the faulty genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 have abnormal levels of female hormones in the bloodstream, which leads them to develop breast and ovarian cancer rather than other cancers, according to new research. According to the results of the study, published in Lancet Oncology, women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are exposed to different levels of the female hormones oestradiol and progesterone. These are already known to be risk factors for breast and ovarian cancer. These differences could not be explained by contraceptive pill use.
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RESEARCH


Hormone therapy's protection against endometrial cancer persists in Women's Health Initiative follow-up study
Ob.Gyn.News
The continuous use of estrogen and progestin protects against the development of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women, according to extended follow-up findings from the seminal Women's Health Initiative randomized, placebo-controlled trial. After a median of 13.2 years' follow-up, there were 35 percent fewer endometrial cancers among women given combined estrogen and progestin vs. placebo. A total of 66 women treated with the hormone therapy and 95 given placebo had developed endometrial cancer, yielding annual incidences of 0.06 percent and 0.10 percent, respectively.
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Citizenship determines woman's odds of having mammogram and cancer tests
News-Medical.net
Citizenship, particularly for non-U.S. natives, largely determines a woman's odds of having a mammogram and being screened for cervical and colorectal cancer, according to new research released today at the American Public Health Association's 141st Annual Meeting in Boston.
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HEALTH POLICY


Hopeful glimmers in long war on cancer
The New York Times
The most recent Retro Report video examines the "war on cancer" — a federal research initiative authorized by President Richard M. Nixon in 1971. Many anticipated quick results, in part because of the public relations campaign, complete with ads suggesting we could cure cancer by the bicentennial, that successfully pushed Nixon into making the commitment. Since then, the United States government has spent over $100 billion on research.
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Congress: Address the cancer care crisis now
Roll Call
The past several weeks in Washington have been chaotic and laced with uncertainties for all Americans, but particularly for federal workers whose livelihoods depend on a functioning government. Many of them certainly awoke each morning asking themselves if they would report to work that day, when they might expect their next paycheck, and how they might afford their childcare, healthcare or next mortgage payment.
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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