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Low estrogen 'improves efficacy' of PARP inhibitors on endometrial cancer
Medical News Today
Researchers have discovered that low hormone levels may make endometrial cancer tumors more sensitive to a class of medication called PARP inhibitors — drugs that induce cancer cell death. This is according to a study published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. Investigators from the University of California-Los Angeles say that previous research on endometrial cancer cell lines has shown that poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors are able to promote cancer cell death in the absence of a protein called phosphatase and tensin homolog — a tumor suppressor.
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HPV


Could home HPV test help detect early cervical cancer?
NBCNEWS.com
Home tests for the human papillomavirus may help detect cervical cancer in women who would not otherwise be screened by a doctor, a new study suggests. In the study, researchers mailed home HPV test kits to 155 women ages 30 to 64 in North Carolina. The women had low incomes or were uninsured, and had not had a Pap smear in at least four years.
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GENETICS


Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor promotes endometrial cancer
ScienceDaily
A study published this week in PLOS Medicine suggests that epigenetic modification of the HAND2 gene plays a critical role in the development of endometrial cancer. HAND2 is active in the healthy endometrium (the tissue lining the uterus) where it antagonizes the growth-inducing effects of estrogen. By contrast, in more than 90 percent of endometrial cancers, the gene has undergone hypermethylation, an epigenetic modification that doesn't change its DNA sequence but renders it inactive.
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Biologists ID new cancer weakness
ScienceBlog
About half of all cancer patients have a mutation in a gene called p53, which allows tumors to survive and continue growing even after chemotherapy severely damages their DNA. A new study from MIT biologists has found that tumor cells with mutated p53 can be made much more vulnerable to chemotherapy by blocking another gene called MK2. In a study of mice, tumors lacking both p53 and MK2 shrank dramatically when treated with the drug cisplatin, while tumors with functional MK2 kept growing after treatment.
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Group launches database of breast, ovarian cancer gene mutations
Venture Beat via iHealthBeat
Last week, Free the Data — an initiative launched by a group of health care providers — publicly released an online database containing information on genetic mutations related to breast and ovarian cancers, Venture Beat reports.
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RESEARCH


Body's natural defense carries early warning system for recurring cancers
Medical Xpress
Scientists at the University of Leeds have found that the immune system's behavior can act as an early warning alarm that detects cancer recurrence, and this could offer a chance for pre-emptive treatment. When cancers go into remission, small groups of cells sometimes hide away, lying dormant until they reawaken and grow once more.
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Chilly temperatures foster cancer growth in mice
Ars Technica
In a paper just published in the PNAS, researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute found that mice living in a relatively cold environment (around 22°C) had cancers that grew more quickly and aggressively than mice living at a nice thermally comfortable temperature (around 30°C). This raises interesting questions about cancer therapies and many cancer studies, which tend to use mice as animal models.
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Study: Tie life expectancy to cancer screening
MedPage Today
Comorbidity status in elderly persons affects life expectancy and perhaps should be considered when suggesting cancer screening, researchers said. Relative to an average person of the same age, a 75-year-old with no comorbid conditions had an estimated life expectancy about 3 years longer, while someone ranked as having a high comorbid status had an estimated life expectancy of 3 years shorter, according to Hyunsoon Cho, PhD, from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues.
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TREATMENT


Making a difference: How cancer registry data improves public health
ADVANCE
In 1992, with the passing of the Cancer Registries Amendment Act, Congress established the National Program of Cancer Registries at the CDC. Currently NPCR provides funding to 45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Pacific Island jurisdictions to collect cancer incidence data, including primary site, histology and stage at diagnosis. These funded programs or Central Cancer Registries, collect NPCR-required data from registrars in medical facilities. These data represent 96 percent of the U.S. population and provide information for understanding and addressing the cancer burden.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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