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As 2014 comes to a close, SNEB would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the SNEB eCommunicator a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 8.


The surprising consequences of banning chocolate milk
EurekAlert!
From May 1: For many children eating school lunch, chocolate milk is a favorite choice. What would happen if chocolate milk were banned from school cafeterias? "Students take 10 percent less milk, waste 29 percent more and may even stop eating school meals," says Andrew Hanks, Ph.D.
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The pros and cons of food stamps at farmers' markets
TIME
From June 12: As part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, low-income moms are provided with vouchers to purchase healthy, nutritious food for their families. Farmers' markets have become part of this program as well, in order to expand the fresh produce options that low-income families have. But the latest study of WIC families in Illinois highlights the fact that the exact benefits of farmers' market vouchers are hard to figure out.
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Parents matter more than they think in how children eat
EurekAlert!
From April 3: Helping children learn to eat well can be a challenge. Some children happily eat whatever is put in front of them while others seem to eat like birds and exist more on air than food. A new study by a researcher at the University of Colorado School of Medicine shows that parents influence how much children eat more than they may think.
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Map: Here's how much each country spends on food
Vox
From July 24: When droughts or crop failures cause food prices to spike, many Americans barely notice. The average American, after all, spends just 6.6 percent of his or her household budget on food consumed at home. (If you include eating out, that rises to around 11 percent.)
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How culturally sensitive are your patient materials?
NICHQ
From Sept. 4: As the U.S. sees an increase — 160 percent in the last two decades — in the number of residents speaking languages other than English at home, the American healthcare system must adapt to communicate effectively with patients. Here are four tips to guide healthcare providers as they develop new materials that are culturally and linguistically appropriate.
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Is Olive Garden healthier than McDonald's? Maybe not
TIME
From Jan. 23: If you're trying to be healthy, sitting down for a meal at a full-service restaurant like Olive Garden is a better option than pulling up to the nearest McDonald's to grab a Big Mac. Right? Wrong. In a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, researchers from Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania studied more than 2,600 menu items at full-service restaurant chains like Olive Garden, Red Lobster and T.G.I Friday's and concluded that the sit-down spots exceed the recommended calories, sodium and saturated fat for a single meal.
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Food packaging chemicals may be harmful to human health over long term
Science Daily
From March 7: The synthetic chemicals used in the packaging, storage and processing of foodstuffs might be harmful to human health over the long term, warn environmental scientists in a commentary in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.
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Do gut bacteria rule our minds?
Newswise
From Aug. 21: It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us — which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold — may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity. In a recent article published in the journal BioEssays, researchers concluded from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.
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Artificial sweeteners may be contributing to obesity
Food Ingredients First
From Oct. 2: Artificial sweeteners, promoted as aids to weight loss and diabetes prevention, could actually hasten the development of glucose intolerance and metabolic disease, and they do it in a surprising way: by changing the composition and function of the gut microbiota — the substantial population of bacteria residing in our intestines. These findings, the results of experiments in mice and humans, were published in Nature.
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Recap of awards presented at the Annual Conference
SNEB
From July 10: Congratulations to all of those honored.
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SNEB eCommunicator

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin Harrison, Content Editor, 469.420.2657  
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Rachel Daeger, SNEB Contact, 317.328.4627  
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The eCommunicator is an online newsletter informing members of current news related to food, nutrition and health from major news outlets. SNEB does not have editorial or other control over the contents of the referenced Web sites, is not responsible for the opinions expressed by the authors of listed articles and does not endorse any product or service. Please note that some publications may require registration or a subscription to access online content.


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