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As 2013 comes to a close, SNEB would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the SNEB eCommunicator a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 9.


Dangerous trend: The cotton ball diet
ABC News
From Dec. 12: The tapeworm diet, the feeding tube diet, the air diet — Brandi Koskie, managing editor of the website Diets in Review, said she thought she'd seen every crazy food fad out there. But then came the cotton ball diet. The diet, as described in chat rooms, on YouTube videos and elsewhere on the Web, involves gobbling up to five cotton balls dipped in orange juice, lemonade or a smoothie in one sitting. The idea is to feel full without gaining weight. Some dieters chow down on the fluffy fillers before a meal to limit their food intake, while others subsist on cotton balls exclusively.
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Resource submitted by The Canned Food Alliance
CFA
From Oct. 17: The Canned Food Alliance has two new resources available to share with consumers or as the basis for educational outreach. The following materials can be found in our resource center:

• The CFA's "Pantry Heroes: 5 Canned Foods to Always Keep on Hand" fact sheet spotlights five canned food favorites, offering a nutrition, value/convenience and recipe tip for each.
• The CFA's "Canned Food Myths - Busted!" fact sheet examines some of the top consumer misconceptions about canned food and counters them with research-based information.

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BMI may not be best measure for obese child's health
Business Standard
From Aug. 22: A new study has claimed that focusing on a single factor like the degree of BMI change among obese children is restrictive and can overlook other important health outcomes. According to the study, an intervention intended to combat childhood obesity can have beneficial effects on other health outcomes, such as cardiovascular fitness, regardless of its effect on BMI.
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Losing weight: Lifestyle change trumps any diet
LiveScience
From Sept. 5: What's the best diet for maintaining a healthy weight and warding off chronic diseases? Is it a low-carb diet, a high-carb diet, an all-vegetable diet, a no-vegetable diet? Researchers say you'd be better off just forgetting the word diet, according to an editorial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Study: Kids who sleep more may eat less
Temple University via EurekAlert!
From Nov. 17: It seems everyone is looking for a culprit when it comes to childhood obesity: fast food, sugary drinks, super-sized everything. But it turns out part of the blame may lie with the simple matter of turning out the lights and rolling into bed.
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'Cupcake bans' rare, but policies may reduce overexposure to sugary treats
Medical Xpress
From Oct. 17: Nearly one in three American children are overweight or obese, but sugary sweets are often on the menu at elementary school classroom parties. But schools with a district policy or state law discouraging sugary foods and beverages were 2.5 times more likely to restrict those foods at parties than were schools with no such policy or law, according to a new study published online in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.
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2013 Healthy Lunchtime Challenge Cookbook
Let's Move!
From Aug. 22: For the second year, the White House challenged America's junior chefs to create original lunchtime recipes that were healthy, affordable, delicious and followed the nutritional guidelines of MyPlate. The 2013 Healthy Lunchtime Challenge Cookbook contains all 54 winning recipes — some of which were featured at the Kids' State Dinner at the White House.

This event, which was hosted by President and Mrs. Obama, celebrated the ingenuity of the budding young chefs. We thank our National Strategic Partners for your integral help in promoting this competition! The cookbook is now online here.

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Health at Every Size curriculum
SNEB
From Sept. 19: Announced at the annual conference, a peer-reviewed curriculum has been designed for teaching health professionals and university students about the Health At Every Size model. The Association for Size Diversity and Health, the National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance and SNEB's Weight Realities and Higher Education Divisions collaborated on the material which is free to download and use. The Health at Every Size model is a health-focused, weight-neutral approach to health that promotes the right to be peaceful in one's body.
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Handouts available from 2013 SNEB Annual Conference
SNEB
From Nov. 27: JNEB Workshop: Best Practices for Survey Validation and Reliability |
Handout http://www.sneb.org/documents/jneb_workshop_2013.pdf |
Replay Webinar http://www.sneb.org/jneb-statistics-survey-design-solutions-success.html

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Handouts available from Briggs session at Annual Conference
SNEB
From Oct. 31: If you missed the George Briggs Science Symposium at the 2013 Annual Conference, the session handouts are now online.

George M. Briggs Nutrition Science Symposium: Phytochemicals | Keen | Steinberg

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Gut feelings: The future of psychiatry may be inside your stomach
The Verge
From Sept. 19: More than 20 years of work treating eating disorders has emphasized Boston-area psychiatrist James Greenblatt's hunch: that the connection between body and mind was more important than conventional psychiatry assumed. "Each year, I get more and more impressed at how important the GI tract is for healthy mood and the controlling of behavior," he said.
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SNEB eCommunicator

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin Harrison, Content Editor, 469.420.2657  
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Rachel Daeger, SNEB Contact, 317.328.4627  
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The eCommunicator is an online newsletter informing members of current news related to food, nutrition and health from major news outlets. SNEB does not have editorial or other control over the contents of the referenced Web sites, is not responsible for the opinions expressed by the authors of listed articles and does not endorse any product or service. Please note that some publications may require registration or a subscription to access online content.


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