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Congratulations to AGPT PTAs recognized by APTA
AGPT
Please join us in congratulating the following AGPT members who recently received PTA Recognition of Advanced Proficiency in Geriatrics.

Alexander Schaub, PTA, BA
Kelli Trobaugh, PTA
Sharon Tebbe, PTA
Lynn Peter-Contesse, PTA, CPI


As recipients of APTA's PTA Recognition of Advanced Proficiency, they will be congratulated at the Honors and Awards Ceremony on June 4 at the 2015 NEXT Conference and Exposition in National Harbor, Maryland.
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AGPT PD grant recipient announced
AGPT
Congratulations to Janet Readinger, PT, DPT and the Arcadia University (Glenside, Pennsylvania) Department of Physical Therapy on receiving a $1,000 grant for research regarding Parkinson's disease for their Movement Camp project. Partial funding for the grant was donated by a generous memorial donation from a family whose loved one was treated by one of our members.
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Attending APTA's NEXT Conference and Exposition in June?
AGPT
Make sure to visit the AGPT booth in the Exhibit Hall and pick up your AGPT member ribbon. We are looking for members to volunteer at the AGPT booth at the NEXT exhibit hall. Please go here to sign up for a one-hour shift and be eligible to win a free one year AGPT membership!

NEXT info can be found here.

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Ideas for new AGPT merchandise?
AGPT
Do you have ideas for what you would like to see for sale in the Academy's online store? Is there something that would look great with our new name and logo? Let us know at karen.curran@geriatricspt.org and we will take all ideas into consideration. Thanks!
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Get Your Patients Stronger, Faster

Eccentric exercise - requiring less energy and less oxygen than traditional concentric exercise - is ideal for the aging population. Help your clients get stronger sooner, improve balance, improve stair descent, and decrease fall risk - with high volume eccentrics. Clients love Eccentron's fun, game-like experience, and stay motivated to make continuing strengthening progress.
 


INDUSTRY NEWS


CDC issues an eye-opening report on death rates from falls
CDC
The rate of deaths from fall injury among Americans 65 and older nearly doubled between 2000 and 2013, and falls now represent over half of the total deaths from unintentional injury among that group, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In a data brief issued on May 7, the CDC reported that from 2000 to 2013, the age-adjusted fall injury death rate rose from 29.6 per 100,000 Americans 65 and older to 56.7 per 100,000. Falls-related deaths now represent 55 percent of all unintentional injury deaths for that group, one of only two unintentional injury categories that actually rose during the study period (unintentional poisoning was the other category that showed an increase, but the uptick was slight, and at 4 percent represents the next-to-smallest cause).

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High-risk women not screening for osteoporosis, but low-risk women are
Physical Therapy Products
According to new research from UC Davis Health System and published online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, osteoporosis screening is too common among low-risk women, but not common enough among high-risk women. Screening rates for osteoporosis rose sharply among women at age 50, even though it is suggested that screening should not start until age 65, unless risk factors are present.
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Colorectal cancer patients heed physical activity advice — if they get it
PT in Motion
The good news: A large-scale British study has found that individuals with colorectal cancer who can recall a clinician giving them advice to stay as physically active as possible tend to do just that. The bad news: Less than a third of CRC patients remember getting any such advice in the first place. The study was published in the May issue of BMJ Open.
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The 'elder orphans' of the baby boom generation
CNN
Recently a 76-year-old man known as HB, whose health had been deteriorating, tried to take his own life and was admitted to North Shore University Hospital on Long Island. Doctors decided that HB would not be able to go back to living by himself because of his condition and complications while in the hospital. With his only family across the country and no social support in the area, the man was placed, possibly permanently, in a nursing home. The experience of HB is not unusual.
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Treating overactive bladder may reduce falls in the elderly
Youth Health Magazine
A study has found that older adults who had a diagnosis of overactive bladder had a 40 percent increased risk of falling that those who did not. The study also found that treating overactive bladder reduced the risk of a fall compared to not treating the condition. Falls result from overactive bladder because of the sudden need to get to the bathroom. The study results were presented recently at the Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association.
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Paralyzed man uses intention of movement to control robotic arm
Medical News Today
A 34-year-old man left paralyzed after suffering a bullet wound has become the first person to have a neuroprosthetic device implanted in the brain region responsible for movement intention, allowing him to control a robotic arm with his mind. Erik Sorto, a father of two from California, endured a gunshot wound at age 21, severing his spinal cord and leaving him unable to move his arms and legs.
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Exercise just as beneficial as giving up smoking for older men
CBS News
There's even more proof of the benefits of staying active as you age. New research finds that just 30 minutes of physical activity six days a week is associated with 40 percent lower risk of death among elderly men — and even light activity helps. The study, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, also found that increasing exercise levels appeared to be as good for health as quitting smoking.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed our previous issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Falls cause most accidental deaths in elderly Americans (Medscape)
Use of mobility devices up by 50 percent among adults 65 and older (PT in Motion)
For an aging brain, looking for ways to keep memory sharp (The New York Times)
True patient-centered care needs a personal touch (FierceHealthcare)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



AGPT NewsBrief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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