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Record Number of Abstracts Submitted to ObesityWeek℠ 2014
TOS
Dear Colleagues,

Although we're still four months away from ObesityWeek, by now, many of you have submitted your research to the conference and are standing by eager to confirm your registration for the leading event in the obesity field.

Last year's inaugural ObesityWeek was quite a hit, but 2014 is sure to be an even more exciting event with a record-breaking number of scientific abstracts submitted to TOS (989) and ASMBS (400) annual meetings — for a grand total of nearly 1,400 abstracts! Late-breaking submissions will likely bring us over the 1500 mark, clearly setting the stage for one of the most exciting, and impactful obesity research and clinical care meetings of 2014.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


TOS President to New York Times: Caring, Skilled Professionals Best Suited to Treat Obesity
TOS
In a recent New York Times story, Invitation to a Dialogue: Talking About Obesity, columnist Carol Weston opined that people with obesity should work to fix their "problem," instead of embracing obesity as part of who they are. Although Ms. Weston's general sentiment is well intentioned, she overlooks several complexities, outlined by TOS President Steven Smith, MD, in a response letter.

Dr. Smith points out that obesity is a chronic disease, yet Ms. Weston speaks of "obese people" as if obesity is an identity rather than a health condition. He further explains that research demonstrates severe childhood obesity is a medical condition that benefits from the skilled care of healthcare professionals, not well-intended strangers, and recommends that severe childhood and adolescent obesity be treated, as such. Find out more in the full letter to the editor here.

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Congratulations to Our Newest Fellows of The Obesity Society (FTOS)!
TOS
Fellowship is one of the highest honors bestowed by TOS and sets members apart by acknowledging high-level contributions to the field of obesity research, treatment and prevention. Once becoming a Fellow, individuals earn the FTOS credentials to convey to colleagues this achievement within a scientific society dedicated to the study of obesity.

Congratulations to our newest Fellows:
  • Joshua Brown, PhD, MUSC Weight Management Center
  • Tae-Hua Chun, MD, PhD, University of Michigan
  • Suniel Daniel, MD, University of Alabama
  • Paul Gordon, PhD, Baylor University
  • James Hamilton, PhD, Boston University
  • Jennifer Kraschnewski, MD, Penn State Hershey Medical Center
  • Michele Levine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic
  • Jon Moon, PhD, MEI Research Ltd
  • Taraneh Soleymani, MD, University of Alabama
You can now apply for TOS Fellowship online! Find out more here.

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Take Action! Support the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act
TOS
TOS is calling on you to take action to support the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act. This legislation will provide Medicare recipients and their healthcare providers with meaningful tools to treat and reduce obesity by improving access to obesity screening and counseling services, and new prescription drugs for chronic weight management.

Learn more about the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act here and send a letter to your members of Congress here.

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Can we Identify Early Non-responders in an Intensive Lifestyle Intervention?
Contributed by Jason P. Block, M.D.
Medicare guidelines and behavioral weight loss trials often determine "non-response" to weight loss treatment after six months. However, according to a new study in the Obesity journal, it's probable that "non-response" is evident much earlier.

Using data from the Look AHEAD trial, a randomized controlled trial among 5,145 participants with type 2 diabetes, Unick and colleagues investigated the relationship between weight loss in the first two months of the study, and weight loss after one year. The trial compared the effect of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI), versus a control group, on long-term cardiovascular outcomes.

The researchers found that early weight loss is highly predictive of longer-term weight loss. Those who had lost <2% of their baseline body weight in the first month typically lost around 5% of their body weight after one year. However, others who lost ≥2% in their first month typically lost about 11% of their body weight after one year. The results were even more extreme when comparing <3% vs ≥3% of baseline body weight lost at 2 months.

This research suggests clinicians should consider altering weight loss strategies for those with poor initial weight loss rather than waiting until later, when patients might become disillusioned with their lack of success.

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eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
TOS
To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include:
    Merchant G, Weibel N, Patrick K, Fowler JH, Norman GJ, Gupta A, Servetas C, Calfas K, Raste K, Pina L, Donohue M, Griswold WG, Marshall S. Click "Like" to Change Your Behavior: A Mixed Methods Study of College Students' Exposure to and Engagement With Facebook Content Designed for Weight Loss. J Med Internet Res. 2014;16(6):e158. http://www.jmir.org/2014/6/e158/

    O'Brien OA, McCarthy M, Gibney ER, McAuliffe FM. Technology-supported dietary and lifestyle intervention in healthy pregnant women: a systematic review. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2014 Jul;68(7):760-766. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24781682

    The European Commission has written a Green Paper on mobile health and has opened the paper to public consultation until July 10, 2014. The Green Paper addressing potential use of mHealth can be found here http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/public-consultation-green-paper-mobile-health under the heading, "How to respond."
If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Anne Gilmore (anne.gilmore@pbrc.edu), and we'll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library.

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Join the #LiveBold movement: Enter HealthCentral's Anti-Stigma Photo Contest by July 11th
TOS
Serious diseases, including obesity, often bring along serious stigma. Join HealthCentral.com's goal to end stigma this summer.

What can you do to help? Ask your patients to share their stories of how they #LiveBold despite a health condition like obesity. What does it mean to #LiveBold? It's finding strength to persevere and thrive despite the adversities of a significant health diagnosis. This doesn't have to be a monumental accomplishment; people #LiveBold in small ways every day. Next, spread the word that you're helping fight stigmas by using the hashtag #LiveBold on your social media pages. Then, between July 15 and August 8, the HealthCentral community will vote for their favorite story. The submission with the most votes will win $500 toward his or her next adventure, with 2nd place winning $250 and 3rd place winning $100.

Find more information and the contest application here.

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Treat Obesity Seriously™ & Sign the Obesity Pledge
TOS
Have you signed the pledge to treat obesity seriously? TOS’s Treat Obesity Seriously website features an Obesity Pledge where you can demonstrate your commitment and encourage your friends and colleagues to do the same. Add your voice to the many others who have signed on by saying:

"I believe obesity isn't just a problem. It's a disease that warrants serious evidence-based treatments. Nutritional and physical activity guidance. Intensive behavioral counseling. Drug therapy. And surgery. Agree to learn more and help more. I treat obesity seriously."


It's simple. Sign the pledge online with your mouse. Print your certificate and hang it on your office or practice wall. Share the pledge with your family, friends and colleagues.

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Job Listings Exclusively for the Obesity Community
TOS
Attention employers, recruiters and job seekers! TOS offers an opportunity to connect you with others exclusively in the obesity community through our online Job Center. Jobseekers can post an anonymous resume, search for listed jobs and create a personalized job alert. Recruiters can search for the best candidate and post jobs all at the click of a button. Check out the Job Center here.
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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Why frequent small meals can stall fast, lasting fat loss
The Huffington Post
A study recently published in the journal Hepatology increased caloric intake of 36 lean, healthy men a whopping 40 percent for six weeks. These men received those increased calories through meal size or meal frequency. In other words, some men ate bigger meals, and others got those excess calories through smaller meals and snacking.
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CDC: Half of all American adults have a chronic illness
New York Daily News
Half of all adults in the U.S. have at least one chronic disease, like diabetes, high blood pressure or obesity, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. And more than a quarter have two or more conditions. The government study, published in The Lancet, is part of a new series in the journal called "The Health of Americans."
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Study: Many obese women face stigma every day
HealthDay News
Women who are overweight and obese are likely to experience frequent, daily insults and humiliation from strangers, family and friends, according to a new study. Fifty overweight and obese women kept week-long diaries that reported a total of 1,077 "weight-stigmatizing" events, with an average of three negative events per individual over seven days.
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NIH study finds extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years
National Institutes of Health
Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three countries. The study, led by researchers from the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, found that people with class III (or extreme) obesity had a dramatic reduction in life expectancy compared with people of normal weight.
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Grief in pregnancy may trigger obesity in adulthood
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Unborn children of mothers exposed to severe stress are more likely than others to grow up overweight or obese, even if that stress occurred months before pregnancy, a new Danish study has found. Children whose biological fathers died while they were in the womb were twice as likely to become obese as adults, because of the stress of bereavement on their mother, the study authors said.
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How much saturated fat is too much?
Examiner
People with a genetic makeup for obesity can benefit from reducing the amount of saturated fat they consume. How much saturated fat is too much? In a recent heart disease prevention study performed at Tufts University's, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, researchers analyzed the genes of over 2,800 women and men who consumed more calories with saturated fat, and with increased genetic risk scores. The subject's ratio of body weight over height, or Body Mass Index was also incorporated in the study.
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Obesity fueling diabetes epidemic in US
San Francisco Chronicle
It's easy to tell if your waistline is growing, but many Americans are missing signs of a more serious consequence of obesity: Type 2 diabetes. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveals almost 1 in 10 Americans has the disease, but a quarter of them don't know it.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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