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Children's Weight Misperception Adds Concerns in Already Challenging Pediatric Obesity Environment
TOS
Recent data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) show that nearly one in three children and adolescents in the United States misperceive their weight status. The data was collected from 6,100 responses from children and adolescents ages 8 through 15, and found that the majority of children and teens with excess weight or obesity thought they were at an average weight.

In a TOS statement, President Steven Smith, MD, says the concern with the findings is two fold.

"Without an accurate understanding of their weight, particularly the health concerns associated with excess weight, parents and children may be less likely to take steps to achieve a healthier weight ... However, shaming all individuals as a result of a weight-related problem can have even worse health consequences."

TOS Advocacy Advisor, Ted Kyle, RPh, also shared his concerns with Food-Navigator-USA, saying that what most troubled him was "the focus on body weight, which distracts from the real issue of health." He added, "it's important to help kids find healthy ways to live, including healthy activities that will have a lasting impact." Read the full article here.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


REMINDER: 2014 Egg Nutrition Grant Applications Due 8/5
TOS
Don't forget to submit your applications for the 2014 Egg Nutrition Research Center grant by the August 5 deadline. This grant will award one TOS member $40,000 for a period of one year. All TOS members interested in applying can submit proposals for studies designed to look at the impact of macronutrient composition on overweight and obesity-related conditions (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, etc.).

Applications are due by end of day on Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014 (5:00 pm EST). Applicants whose LOI are judged well will be announced on Aug. 26, 2014, and will be invited to submit a full proposal by Sept. 16, 2014. The grant recipient will be notified by Oct. 14, 2014, and announced at ObesityWeek℠ 2014, Nov. 2-7 in Boston, MA.

For more information about the grant application process, please visit the website.

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OCC Takes on Capitol Hill with New Full Page Ad
TOS
The Obesity Care Continuum (OCC) recently spearheaded a two-day advertising blitz on Capitol Hill with a full-page ad in Roll Call. This particular campaign was sponsored by TOS and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, as well as other members of the OCC. The message of the campaign is clear- Congress and the Administration need to take action to ensure that Americans affected by obesity have access to medically necessary evidence-based treatments in the same fashion that others do with chronic disease.

Read more about TOS's advocacy efforts in Washington, DC, here.

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ObesityWeek Early Bird Registration Closes August 15!
TOS
Get the best prices for ObesityWeek by registering now! Early Bird Registration closes Friday, August 15, 2014. When you register be sure to book your hotel. We've reserved blocks of rooms at nine different hotels across Boston, giving you the freedom to pick the hotel that's right for you. View our hotel information page for details. Space is limited at all of our hotels, so register now to guarantee your reservation.

Don't forget to plan your ObesityWeek itinerary using our interactive schedule. See you in Boston!

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NIH to Fund Glycoscience Research
TOS
The National Institutes of Health's (NIH's) Common Fund is focusing on a number of new research initiatives, including glycoscience — the study of how sugar modifications affect proteins. The complexity of carbohydrate chemistry makes the analysis of these sugar modifications inaccessible to most biomedical researchers; however the new glycoscience program from NIH will develop methodologies and resources to make the study of sugar modifications more accessible to the broad biomedical research community.

This program, along with other new research initiatives from the NIH Common Fund, aim to tackle some of the most difficult and novel challenges the biomedical research community faces. Read more about the NIH Common Fund and its new and existing programs here.

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Probiotic Prevents Obesity in Mice
Contributed by HealthCentral
A probiotic that prevents obesity and insulin resistance, even in a person eating a high-fat diet, could be on the horizon, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The research was done with mice, but the scientists say their results suggest that obesity and other chronic diseases could be treated by manipulating gut bacteria.

The researchers chose a bacterial strain that has been used as a probiotic to treat diarrhea for 100 years, then modified that strain to produce a compound called NAPE. This compound is normally synthesized in the small intestine after eating and is rapidly converted to another compound that reduces both food intake and weight gain. Some evidence suggests that people who eat a high-fat diet have lower production of NAPE. Continue reading...

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eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
TOS
To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include: If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Anne Gilmore (anne.gilmore@pbrc.edu), and we’ll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library.
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Call to Researchers: Submit Your Published Papers on Obesity to the eNews
TOS
Are you working on groundbreaking research of interest to the obesity community? Will the research be published in a scientific or clinical research journal? If so, please share the paper with TOS Communications Department and we will consider it for inclusion in an upcoming edition of the eNews. Please send a link to your research along with a 200-word summary to Communications@obesity.org.
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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Healthy 'brown fat' may cut odds for obesity, diabetes
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
People with higher levels of brown fat have a reduced risk for obesity and diabetes, a new study suggests. Unlike white fat, which lowers insulin sensitivity, researchers found that brown fat actually improves insulin sensitivity, blood sugar control and fat-burning metabolism.
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Eisai and Arena Pharmaceuticals announce publication of post-hoc analyses of Lorcaserin Phase 3 clinical trial results in Obesity
PRNewswire via MarketWatch
Eisai Inc. and Arena Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced that an article based on post-hoc analyses from the three pivotal Phase 3 trials of lorcaserin entitled, "Early Weight Loss While on Lorcaserin, Diet, and Exercise as a Predictor of Week 52 Weight-Loss Outcomes," was recently published in the online issue of Obesity, the official peer reviewed journal of The Obesity Society.
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Many parents think their obese child's health is good
LiveScience
Nearly 1 in 3 parents whose children were referred to an obesity clinic did not perceive their child's weight as a health problem, a new study suggests. Researchers found that 31 percent of parents of obese or overweight children considered their child's health to be excellent or very good, and 28 percent of parents did not view their child's weight as a health concern.
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Child siblings may influence each other's obesity risk
Reuters
Brothers or sisters might have a greater influence than parents on a child's likelihood of being obese, suggests new U.S. research. The study, based on data from the larger national Family Health Habits Survey, found that kids with obese parents were about twice as likely to be obese themselves, but having an obese sibling raised a child’s risk of obesity five-fold or more in some cases.
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Weight Watchers tops in efficacy vs. cost
MedPage Today
Among the most popular diet programs and drugs, Weight Watchers trims the most bulge for the buck, according to a new cost-effectiveness analysis. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year was $34,630 for Weight Watchers, well under the commonly accepted threshold of $50,000, Eric Finkelstein, PhD, of Duke University, and colleagues reported in the journal Obesity.
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11 foods that make you hungrier
Fox News
Feeling hungry? You should eat. But what if the foods you're eating actually make you hungrier than you were before you dug in? It's a more common conundrum than you might think.
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Gallup poll: Unemployment linked to weight gain, obesity
HealthCentral
It has been nearly five years since the American job market tanked. The Great Recession tore a hole in the economy big enough to drive a train through and now, finally, we are at the point where it all began.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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