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Vote! And support the future of The Obesity Society
Letter from the Executive Director
Dear Colleagues,

As professionals in the obesity research, treatment, and prevention community, and members of The Obesity Society (TOS), we all have an opportunity — and a responsibility — to vote for those who represent us in the Society's Council. Each August, we rely on you, our members, to select the best and brightest to fill open positions and support the future of the Society.

TOS Council consists of an Executive Committee, made up of five primary officers, who are joined by 10 Councilors representing various areas of the field. This group of 15 TOS leaders seeks to bring together every facet of the obesity research and treatment landscape, from basic scientists to nutritionists to bariatric nurses, physicians and surgeons. The diverse representation on our Council allows us to call on experts across the obesity field, and better serve our members and the millions of people affected by obesity. Together, these Council members develop our organization’s strategy and goals, and help us reach new milestones.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


Now available: Print edition of full Obesity Guidelines report
TOS
TOS took the next step to advance the treatment of obesity by publishing an unprecedented level of obesity research, in print and online, as a supplement to its July and August issues of the Obesity journal: Guidelines (2013) for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults: Full Report. Now, the print version of the supplement is available for purchase as a reference guide for obesity treatment.

TOS is the only organization making an added investment to advance the treatment of obesity by distributing the full edition of the guidelines in print (nearly 500 pages) to its print journal subscribers. TOS members who already receive the print edition of Obesity will receive this supplement with their usual journal shipment. TOS members who receive the journal electronically will receive an email with information for purchasing the supplement at a discounted price. Anyone who wishes to purchase a copy of the print guidelines may do so via the Obesity journal storefront.

Don't forget to use the following citation when referring to the guidelines in your work:
    Jensen MD, Ryan DH, Donato KA, Apovian CM, Ard JD, Comuzzie AG, Hu FB, Hubbard VS, Jakicic JM, Kushner RF, Loria CM, Millen BE, Nonas CA, Pi-Sunyer FX, Stevens J, Stevens VJ, Wadden TA, Wolfe BM, Yanovski SZ. Guidelines (2013) for managing overweight and obesity in adults. Obesity 2014;22(S2):S1-S410.

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Apply for the Susan G. Komen ObesityWeek Travel Award
Contributed by the Obesity & Cancer Section
For the second year, Susan G. Komen is providing a travel award for a young investigator to attend the Obesity & Cancer Section Meeting at ObesityWeek. The $1,500 award is designed to defray the cost of travel to the meeting, and is meant to recognize and reward one outstanding young investigator whose work is focused on obesity and breast cancer.

The Obesity & Cancer Section is now requesting applications from junior faculty, up to and including the rank of Assistant Professor, to be considered for this award. Prior submission of an abstract to ObesityWeek is not required to be eligible for this award. The deadline for submissions is Friday, Sept. 19, 2014 at 5:00pm ET. See award eligibility and requirements here.

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2014 TOS elections open soon!
TOS
TOS 2014 Council and Nominating Committee Elections e-ballot is scheduled to open Monday, Aug. 25 and run through Thursday, Sept. 4. The e-ballot will be sent to current Fellows and regular members of TOS. Please ensure your membership status is up to date so that you are able to vote for the Society's new leaders. Access TOS Member Center here to verify your membership status.

This year (as always!) we have an outstanding group of candidates for you to consider for the following positions on Council: Vice President, Clinical Practice Councilor, Councilor At-Large and Councilor At-Large: Representative to Mexico. There are also three open positions on the Nominating Committee. TOS members will have the opportunity to review the candidates' statements once the e-ballot has opened and prior to voting.

Please contact Jean McMahon, Governance and Executive Assistant at governance@obesity.org or 240-485-1955, if you have questions regarding the election process.

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Get to know a TOS Fellow! Q&A with Donna Ryan, MD
Contributed by the Early Career Section
It's time for another edition of the Q&A interviews with TOS Fellows! This is the perfect opportunity to get to know leaders in the obesity field a little better, and learn a bit more about their personal lives outside of work. Here are some questions and answers from our interview with Donna Ryan, MD, Professor Emerita at Pennington Biomedical Research Center:

Q: Please tell us about your current work and your professional developmental trajectory.
A: I started in clinical oncology, transitioned to academic administration, and then branched into clinical research in obesity. After 35 years in academic medicine, I retired from the University and now actively consult with industry and government.

Q: What advice do you have for today's junior obesity researchers?
A: Work hard. Treat others with kindness, always. Remain calm when adversity strikes; you can get through this.

Q: What are your favorite things to do when you're not at work?
A: My absolute favorite thing to do is cook a special meal for a holiday or birthday and have all my family over to enjoy it. My second favorite thing is to take a nap on the sofa while Ed is watching golf. I also love nature and enjoy hiking in the mountains or even walking along the Mississippi riverfront.

Read the rest of the interview with Dr. Ryan here. These interviews will be featured bi-monthly in the TOS eNews. Don't miss the next one on September 3!

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TOS late-breaking abstract submission site is now open
TOS
If you have late-breaking data to submit for oral and poster presentation at ObesityWeek 2014, the abstract submission site is now open. The site will close on Tuesday, Sept. 2 at 5:00pm ET.

Each year, ObesityWeek highlights cutting-edge findings across a broad range of topics — from the basic science of obesity, to treatment and prevention. You won't want to miss this prestigious opportunity to present your research to your esteemed colleagues, industry, media, state and federal health authorities and the public. Late-breaking abstracts must describe new and high impact research for data, which was not available for the June 2014 deadline. You may find a link to the submission site here and instructions for submitting late-breaking abstracts here.

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Breastfeeding associated with lower risk of obesity in chinese children
TOS
Breastfeeding is generally considered to be the optimal method for feeding babies due to its tendency to reduce children's health threats like diarrhea and respiratory infections, as well as chronic conditions such as diabetes and obesity. Although this knowledge is widely accepted, most studies investigating the correlation between breastfeeding and obesity have been conducted in Western populations, and it was not previously known whether the same kind of association occurs in other cultural groups, such as with Asians.

To address this issue, an international collaboration of researchers studied data from 42,550 children from the Jiaxing region of China to examine relationships between breastfeeding and risk of being overweight at 4-5 years of age. In a paper published in the Sept. 2014 issue of The Journal of Nutrition, the researchers reported their findings that breastfed, Chinese children are indeed less likely to become overweight than their formula-fed counterparts. The scientists also found that children who had been breastfed for longer periods of time had lower risk for obesity than those who were not breastfed or were breastfed for shorter durations.

The full study is available here.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Higher BMI increased risk for 10 common cancers
Healio
Higher BMI increased individuals' risks for 10 common cancers, according to results of a population-based cohort study conducted in the United Kingdom. More than 12,000 cases of these malignancies each year in the U.K. can be attributed to patients being overweight or obese, and nearly 4,000 more of these cancers could occur each year if the average BMI of the country's population continues to increase, results showed.
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Sports drinks for the non-sporty cause weight gain
Inside Science via The Philadelphia Inquirer
Elite athletes down sports drink to help them reach new heights of performance. But for the average young person, these "health drinks" may cause them to reach new highs — on the bathroom scale. A new study published in the journal Obesity suggests that young people who consume one or more sports drinks each day gained more weight over a three year period than classmates who chose other beverages.
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Pennington Biomedical discovery changes way of looking at hormone linked to weight loss
Pennington Biomedical Research Center
Researchers at Pennington Biomedical Research Center have discovered a new pathway that controls how our bodies respond to a diet that's low in protein. This finding could improve treatments for obesity and diabetes.
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Can chickpeas help you lose weight?
The Boston Globe
Could eating pulses, which are a specific type of legumes that includes, dried beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils, help you better manage your weight? Maybe ... according to a recent study published in the journal, Obesity.
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Could obesity be a risk factor for inflammatory breast cancer?
Examiner
Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare but lethal breast cancer. There is not much knowledge known about the epidemiology of inflammatory breast cancer; however, with ongoing research some risk factors are becoming evident. One of these risk factors that is becoming evident is an increased Body Mass Index.
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Almost half of Americans will develop diabetes
Health Central
The incidence of type 2 diabetes is rapidly rising in the U.S. and new research now suggests that 40 percent of Americans will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. For the study, researchers analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey, which disclosed diabetes incidence in the U.S. from 1985 to 2011. They also assessed the death certificates of 598,216 adults.
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Antibiotics early in life may boost obesity risk
MedPage Today
Exposure to antibiotics early in life may permanently alter gut microbes in a way that could increase obesity risk years later, researchers reported. In a study that compared outcomes in mice given low-dose penicillin versus those who were not, infancy was identified as a critical window of host-microbe metabolic interaction, suggesting that early-life antibiotic exposure can lead to lifelong metabolic changes, wrote Martin Blaser, M.D., of NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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