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TOS elections open — Don't forget to vote before Aug. 30!
TOS
As members of the obesity research, prevention and treatment community, we all have an opportunity and responsibility to vote for those who represent us in The Obesity Society's leadership – the TOS Council. TOS leaders define our organization’s goals and help guide us to reach new milestones. The diverse representation on our Council allows us to call on experts across the obesity field, and better serve our members and the millions of people affected. The e-ballot has been sent to current Fellows and Regular Members of TOS. If you did not receive the e-ballot make sure your membership status is active so that you can vote. Login to the TOS Member Center here to verify your membership status.

If you have any questions please contact Sadie Campbell at scampbell@obesity.org.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


TOS announces 2013 Early-Career research grant recipients
TOS
The Early-Career research program targets junior-level investigators and postdoctoral trainees by funding proposals that demonstrate a high likelihood of resulting in new and innovative approaches in obesity research. Early-Career Investigators are defined as individuals who have received a PhD within the past five years or MD within the past eight years and who currently hold full-time, entry-level positions (e.g., post-doctoral fellow, instructor, assistant professor) at an established academic/research institution. Awards of $25,000 each is given to the recipients for a one-year pilot study. We are pleased to announce this year's recipients:

  • Kristen E. Boyle, Ph.D., University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo.
    Title: "The Effect of Maternal Obesity on Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation"

  • Kari Johansson, Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    Title: "Perinatal and Pregnancy Outcomes after Bariatric Surgery: A Nationwide Cohort Study"
    Mentor: Martin Neovius, Ph.D.
    Co-Investigators: Olof Stephansson, MD, Ph.D.; Sven Cnattingius, Prof., MD, Ph.D., and Ingmar Näslund, MD, Ph.D.

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    TOS announces Ethan Sims Young Investigator Award finialists
    TOS
    The Ethan Sims Young Investigator Award recognizes excellence in research by young investigators based on their submitted abstracts and their presentations during the Annual Scientific Meeting. The finalists will present their abstracts during a general session at ObesityWeek on Nov. 15; following the presentations, a winner will be chosen and announced. Congratulations to this year's five finalists!

  • Brittany Beauchamp, Ph.D. candidate, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • John Dawson, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Ala.
  • Bonggi Lee, Ph.D., National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.
  • Elizabeth Mietliki-Baase, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Brie Turner-McGrievy, Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.

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    Corporate-Sponsored Symposia at ObesityWeek℠ address range of topics
    TOS
    Recently added to the ObesityWeek program are five Corporate-Sponsored Symposia, which will address topics ranging from personalized obesity medicine to practical approaches for patients who are obese and well. Sponsors and supporters include Vindico Medical Education, Eisai Inc., Novo Nordisk, Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., and VIVUS, Inc. Find out more information on the symposia and the schedules here.
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    TOS is accepting late-breaking abstracts for ObesityWeek℠
    TOS
    TOS's late-breaking abstract submission site for ObesityWeek℠ 2013 is open! Don't miss this chance to submit your abstracts to the following tracks:
  • Metabolism and Integrative Physiology
  • NeuroscieneIntervention and Clinical Studies
  • Population Health
  • Policy

  • Accepted abstracts will be presented at the Annual Meeting as oral presentations or posters. The late-breaking abstract submission period for 2013 opened on Aug. 15 and will close Sept. 7. Visit this link for more information.

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    ABOM exam registration open: Exam dates Dec. 7-14
    TOS
    Interested in a subspecialty in obesity medicine? An obesity medicine physician is trained and certified to employ therapeutic interventions, including diet, physical activity, behavioral change and pharmacotherapy. The American Board of Obesity Medicine is holding its next exam Dec. 7-14. Find out more here and don't forget to register before the Sept. 20 deadline.

    If you're planning to take the exam, the ABOM review course held during ObesityWeek℠ 2013 can help you prepare. The 2013 course includes an updated approach from the previous year, with more coverage of certain domains, a discussion of sample test questions, as well as didactic lectures. Attendees will also have an opportunity to review the materials in advance. Find out more about the course here.

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    Obesity Journal announces Stephen Anton, Ph.D., as new Associate Editor
    TOS
    Stephen Anton, Ph.D., joins the Obesity journal as an Associate Editor. Dr. Anton is an Assistant Professor and Chief of the Clinical Research Division within the Department of Aging and Geriatric Research at the University of Florida. He has dedicated over a decade of his impressive career to disciplines surrounding aging, obesity, metabolic disease, nutrition, and cognitive and physical function. Dr. Anton replaces Associate Editor Gary Foster, Ph.D., who has accepted a position as the Co-Chief Scientific Officer at Weight Watchers International, Inc.
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    Obesity study shows tapered meals can help weight loss
    TOS
    A recent study published online in Obesity puts some hard science behind a recommendation that clinicians have been giving patients for many years to help with weight loss. The study was a randomized trial of a calorie-restricted diet for weight loss (1400 kcal/day). Half the participants ate their large meal for breakfast, and half ate their largest meal at dinner. The large meal was 700 kcal in both conditions. Researchers found that the group that ate their large meal at breakfast had substantially greater weight loss after 12 weeks (8.7 percent versus 3.6 percent of initial weight). Both groups had improvements in fasting glucose and insulin resistance, but the increases were significantly greater in the large breakfast group. The large breakfast group also had lower hunger ratings throughout the day. The large breakfast group also had smaller increases in blood glucose and insulin after a lunch meal, as compared to the large dinner group, even though the same number of calories was eaten at lunch in both groups.

    It is important to note that, across all three meals, the diet consumed was 41 percent protein and only 32 percent carbohydrate, which is substantially different than the macronutrient intake of most Americans. This study, although small and in need of replication, provides important results for researchers and clinicians who treat obesity. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized trial in humans to show that the timing and size of meals has an important role in losing weight, and that, broadly speaking, shifting calorie intake to earlier in the day is likely to help with weight loss. Patients should be instructed that eating a larger breakfast really does help!

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    2 new research studies break ground on obesity and pregnancy
    TOS
    A study published in this month's issue of Obesity is breaking new ground in examining potential long-term body mass index changes associated with childbearing. Researchers were able to look at weight changes over 25 years using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth cohort. They examined at the impact of childbearing based on the number of births, race/ethnicity and BMI. Over the first 10 years of participating in the cohort, Abrams and colleagues found that childbearing was associated with weight gain among overweight women, regardless of race/ethnicity. At 25 years post-baseline, overweight black women who had multiple children, in particular, were at significantly greater risk of accumulating weight associated with childbearing.

    In addition, another study shows adiposity is associated with sub-par clinical pregnancy rate following assisted reproductive technologies like in vitro fertilization. A study by Merhi and colleagues in this month’s Obesity investigated poor embryo quality as a potential mediator to explain the link between male adiposity and low clinical pregnancy rate. Based on 344 infertile couples, those couples with an overweight or obese male partner had a significantly lower clinical pregnancy rate, even controlling for female age, female BMI, number of embryos transferred, and sperm concentration. However, this association was not explained by embryo quality up to day three of development. The authors call for further research on other morphologic, molecular, metabolic, or epigenetic factors as potential mediators to explain the relationship between parental adiposity and decreased success after in vitro fertilization.

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    Novo Nordisk appoints new leader of North American affiliate
    TOS
    Novo Nordisk has appointed Jesper Høiland as president of Novo Nordisk, Inc., the company's North American affiliate. The appointment became effective Aug. 1. Mr. Høiland was previously Novo Nordisk's head of International Operations where he oversaw all of the company's operations outside of Europe, China, Japan, Korea and North America. He replaces Jerzy Gruhn, who served in the role since 2008. Gruhn has been appointed to lead the company's European business. In the first six months of 2013, the North American region accounted for 46 percent of total Novo Nordisk reported sales.
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    Call for abstracts: ICO 2014, Mar. 17-20, 2014
    TOS
    The International Scientific Committee for the International Congress on Obesity (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, March 17 – 20, 2014) invites abstract submissions for oral and poster sessions. Abstracts will be accepted for 15-minute oral presentations or poster presentations. Authors will be notified of the ISC review outcome in early December 2013, prior to the early bird registration deadline. The abstract submission deadline is Monday, Oct. 28, 2013.

    The International Association for the Study of Obesity invites abstract submitters to apply for the New Investigator Award and IJO New Faculty Award. These will be presented during the ICO. Find criteria, instructions and general information here.

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    Childhood obesity rates drop in 18 states and 1 US Territory
    TOS
    A new report on obesity among preschool children enrolled in federal health and nutrition programs shows the nation is making important progress to reverse the epidemic.

    Among the places with declines, the U.S. Virgin Islands had the greatest decrease, from 13.6 percent in 2008 to 11 percent in 2011, and rates in Florida, Georgia, Missouri, New Jersey, and South Dakota dropped by at least one percentage point during that period. Rates remained stable in 20 states and Puerto Rico and increased in only three states — Colorado, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

    The authors cite several factors that may have helped contribute to the declines:

  • updates to Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children
  • new nutrition and physical activity standards for early child care programs
  • increased support for breastfeeding mothers

  • Read the full report from the CDC
    .

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    OBESITY IN THE NEWS


    Obesity may be more than one disease experts say
    ABC News
    When the American Medical Association classified obesity as a disease, Nikhil Dhurandhar, a researcher and vice president of The Obesity Society, said he welcomed the news as an acknowledgment of the challenges people face fighting the battle of the bulge. But he wondered if the declaration went far enough.
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    Obesity's death toll could be higher than believed, study says
    Los Angeles Times
    The death toll of the nation's obesity epidemic may be close to four times higher than has been widely believed, and all that excess weight could reverse the steady trend of lengthening life spans for a generation of younger Americans, new research warns.
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    Florida finally thinning down, says nation's Fat Report
    Orlando Sentinel
    After decades of steadily getting fatter, Florida residents are starting to lighten up, according to the just-released "F as in Fat" report. The state's overall obesity rate decreased to 25.2 percent of adults, down from 26.6 percent the year before, according to the new report funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America's Health, two nonprofit organizations working to improve the nation's health.
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    TOS past-president honored with Obesity Action Coalition's Chairman Award
    ConscienHealth
    Think about a disease epidemic that people didn't understand at first. We didn't have good evidence-based treatment options, so a lot of energy went into blaming the patients. Way too many healthcare providers ignored the problem or shunned the patients. And health policy was based more on bias than evidence. It took activists, patients, and some dedicated healthcare providers to turn such a disaster around.
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    Opinion: Progress on obesity, but the war is far from over
    The Washington Post
    There have been a few signs recently that obesity might not develop into the spectacular public-health crisis it seemed destined to become. It might just remain a huge public-health crisis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this month that the obesity rate dropped among younger, poor children in 19 states and territories between 2008 and 2011.
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    Tweet chat wrap-up: The big picture on obesity
    ABC News
    Recently, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released its annual "F" is for Fat report. It showed that, for the first time ever, obesity rates held steady in every state in the nation except Arkansas. Mixed in with the report's good news was also some bad news: The rate of obesity for men has jumped six percentage points in the past decade, so that male and female obesity rates are now virtually identical at about 36 percent.
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    New report: Adult obesity rates hold steady but remain high
    PR Newswire via Drugs.com
    After three decades of increases, adult obesity rates remained level in every state except for one, Arkansas, in the past year, according to F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2013, a report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
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    New studies link BPA to childhood obesity and asthma
    Mother Nature Network
    More bad health news for BPA, as two new studies have recently been released linking the chemical — commonly found in plastic food packaging — to childhood obesity and asthma. The first study, conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan, found that kids who are exposed to higher levels of BPA were more likely to be obese, and tended to have a higher waist circumference-to-height ratio, than those with the lower exposure levels.
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    Habits linked to obesity may differ for boys and girls
    Reuters via Fox News
    Some behaviors, such as TV watching and eating school lunches, were linked to obesity among sixth grade boys and girls in a new study, but other risk factors were gender specific. Involvement in sports, for example, was tied to a lower risk of obesity in boys but not girls and drinking milk was linked to lowered risk among girls but not boys, according to researchers from the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, Mich.
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    AMA to cease publication of American Medical News
    American Medical Association
    The American Medical Association announced recently that it will stop publishing American Medical News effective Sept. 9. AMA officials cited the decline of the business model for newspapers, including declining advertising revenues and the ongoing migration of readers to online and digital platforms as driving forces behind the decision.
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    Can drinking milk and playing sports cut childhood obesity?
    The New Age
    A new U.S. study finds that sixth-grade girls who drink two daily servings of milk cut their risks of obesity, and boys of the same age who played on a sports team were also at a healthier weight. The study, published online in the journal Pediatrics recently, reveals some gender differences in how daily habits may influence obesity among young children.
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    Fighting obesity with apps and websites
    Medical Xpress
    A pending component of health care reform would require restaurants and vending machines to list calorie information on menus to help fight obesity. But there's little evidence to date that it's an effective way to prevent overeating.
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