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Sign the Obesity Pledge: Letter from the President
TOS
Dear Colleagues,

Today, I'm pleased to announce the Obesity Pledge. This past summer, resulting from nearly a year of crafting in partnership with our Corporate Advisory Council, TOS launched a new campaign dedicated to getting clinicians the tools they need to prevent, diagnose and treat obesity — Treat Obesity Seriously. The initiative is one of the various ways TOS is working to help improve clinical obesity education, a need further illustrated in the recent issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. We recognize the challenges faced in a busy practice, and are working to make it easier to for clinicians to incorporate evidence-based obesity medicine into patient care.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


Countdown to ObesityWeek℠ — Online Registration Rate Ends Oct. 18
TOS
We're just one month out from the inaugural ObesityWeek℠ conference in Atlanta. Our special online registration rates end Oct. 18. Don't forget to register before the deadline here. Online registration will remain open after this deadline, but at the onsite registration rate.
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TOS, AACE/ACE Issue Comprehensive Healthy Eating Guidelines for Adults
TOS
TOS joins the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) to publish clinical practice guidelines to assist physicians and other healthcare personnel with the prevention and management of endocrine and metabolic disorders in adults. The guidelines were jointly developed by the organizations to address the lack of large-scale, uniform standards for healthy eating and patient nutritional education.

"In issuing these guidelines, it is our intent to fill the medical gap that currently exists by defining evidence-based, necessary and specific clinical strategies for the prevention and treatment of a broad range of metabolic disorders in adults," said J. Michael González-Campoy, MD, PhD, FACE, who co-chaired the guidelines committee. Read the full guidelines here.

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Physician Education on Obesity: Beyond Nutrition and Exercise Education
TOS
The topic of medical training in obesity for physicians continues to attract attention. A recent perspectives piece in the New England Journal of Medicine by James Colbert and Sushrut Jangi highlights both the need for more education for physicians and a persistent lack of awareness of the breadth and depth this education should entail. In his blog, TOS's Arya Sharma, MD, makes excellent points about the potential shortcomings of the approach offered in the NEJM piece. He highlights the need for comprehensive obesity education for physicians to assist them in dealing with overweight and obese patients. Dr Sharma aptly points out that a focus solely on the "eat-less-move-more paradigm" has consistently failed our patients in the past. He further points our that "While Colbert and Jangi note the importance of educating physicians in nutrition and motivational interviewing, I would take that this is far too 'nutrition-centric' a view of what is needed." As many of you are aware, TOS has been working hard through our participation in ABOM Physician credentialing exam development, related ongoing exam preparation courses and the Treat Obesity Seriously Campaign to continue to broaden the knowledge base of frontline providers. Please join us in spreading the word about these essential initiatives.
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Capitol Update: Federal Shutdown Dampens Momentum, Technical Glitches in State Marketplace Restrict Enrollment, Obesity Coverage Analysis
TOS
TOS's efforts on Capitol Hill aren't without barriers. In mid-September, we combined efforts with the Obesity Action Coalition to visit legislators in Washington to ask that they support and cosponsor the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act. The effort was a grand success, securing 18 new cosponsors on the bill; however, the recent federal shutdown has dampened momentum. In addition, technical glitches in the state marketplace roll out have prevented many uninsured from enrolling and precluded the obesity community from evaluating the scope of coverage for obesity treatment. Read about these issues and others in the Capitol Update here.
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Waist Circumference and Brain Response to High-Calorie Food Cues
TOS
In this month's issue of Obesity, researchers tested how obese individuals brains respond to images of high-caloric foods, as well as how appetite levels changed among a group of 13 young Hispanic women with obesity. This is the first study to investigate brain responses to food cues in the Hispanic population, who have a disproportionate prevalence and incidence of obesity, greater abdominal fat distribution, and type 2 diabetes. Luo and colleagues focused on abdominal fat (measured by waist circumference) because abdominal fat and obesity is associated with a number of health conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and dementia. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), Luo and colleagues found that regions of the brain associated with the regulation of food reward and motivation were activated, and the women's ratings of hunger and desire for sweet and savory foods rose after looking at pictures of foods, but did not change significantly after looking at pictures of non-food items. There was also a stronger effect for high-calorie foods compared to low-calorie foods. Exposure to high-calorie food cues (e.g., advertisements) heighten our appetite for these foods, and this study suggests it may be particularly strong among those who have greater abdominal fat (at least among those who are already obese). Read the full study here.
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Reception for Fellows in Obesity Medicine and Nutrition at ObesityWeek℠
TOS
An Obesity Medicine Fellows Reception will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013 from 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. and is intended to promote communication and cross-institutional interaction among the growing community of physicians whose clinical specialization is directed toward obesity and related disorders. Clinical fellows in all Obesity Medicine and Nutrition subspecialty programs, as well as recent Fellowship graduates, Students and Residents who may be interested in Obesity Medicine training are invited to attend and meet with faculty and Obesity Medicine leaders from around the country. Stay up to date on the latest at ObesityWeek.com.
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TOS Media and Communications Workshop at ObesityWeek℠
TOS
TOS invites our members to join in for a media and communications workshop at ObesityWeek℠ on Wednesday, Nov. 13 from 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. This session will include a refresher on obesity communications. Presenters Sylvia Rowe and Nick Alexander will cover everything from tips for public speaking and communicating with reporters to effective one-to-one meetings and networking at small group events. Mark your calendars! You won't want to miss this opportunity to learn from the experts. Stay up to date on the latest at ObesityWeek.com.
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Network and Connect at TOS Section Events at Obesity℠
TOS
One of the greatest networking opportunities will take place at ObesityWeek℠, Nov. 11-16, in Atlanta. Each year during the event, the TOS Sections host events and activities where members with similar interests, expertise and/or educational background come together to recognize groundbreaking research, network and develop a plan to help advance TOS's goals.

Throughout the year, TOS Sections plan activities that commence at our Annual Meeting, this year at ObesityWeek℠. Whether you're interested in eHealth/mHealth, obesity & cancer or any of the eight other obesity specialties covered by our sections (or all of the above) you can find your niche at one (or all) of the upcoming ObesityWeek℠ Section events. You won't want to miss these opportunities to meet prestigious Section award recipients, dine and network with others in your specific research area, and hear from some of the leading scientists in the field. Find out more about these events here, and don't forget to add them to your agenda when you register for ObesityWeek℠.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


The need for better obesity education — In medical schools
Time
When it comes to the obesity epidemic, it's not just patients, but doctors who need an education. In a perspective published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers argue that part of the blame for the obesity epidemic lies with physicians — more specifically, the way doctors are trained.
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Medicare eases rule for bariatric surgery centers
MedPage Today
Staying the course on bariatric surgery, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services eliminated a certification requirement for facilities that provide bariatric procedures. According to a decision memo posted on the agency's website, CMS "determined that the evidence is sufficient to conclude that continuing the requirement for certification for bariatric surgery facilities would not improve health outcomes for Medicare beneficiaries. Therefore, CMS has decided to remove this certification requirement."
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Atlanta to host week-long obesity conference
WABE-FM
Atlanta has been chosen to host the first Obesity Week Conference, to take place at the Georgia World Congress Center Nov. 11-16. More than 4,000 health professionals are expected to attend the inaugural event, which is being co-hosted by the Obesity Society and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. There, the topics of discussion will be obesity treatment and prevention.
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President Taft's obesity struggle was a harbinger of things to come
HealthDay News
In recent decades obesity has reached epidemic levels in many countries, but the struggle to shed those pounds is nothing new — as exemplified by the case of the 27th U.S. president. In 1905, William Howard Taft, who was then Secretary of War, began a long-term correspondence with a British doctor who was considered a diet guru of the time. A new analysis of their letters, published in the Oct. 15 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, offers a glimpse into what obesity treatment was like more than a century ago, at least for a famous, powerful person.
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Medical specialty society offers 1st-ever obesity treatment algorithm to physicians
Yahoo Finance
Today, the American Society of Bariatric Physicians rolls out the first-ever comprehensive algorithm that navigates the physician's role in medically treating and caring for patients affected by obesity. The ASBP Obesity Algorithm — developed and written for the Society by a group of leading obesity medicine specialists — aims to give all physicians training and tools for prescribing and implementing obesity treatment plans for patients.
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Battling fat? Get more sleep
U.S. News & World Report
Lack of sleep doesn't just make you bleary-eyed and prone to muddled decision-making. It also makes you gain weight and raises your risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. What qualifies as "short sleep" varies by person. But adults generally skimp when they fall below 7-and-a-half or eight hours, and teenagers need a good solid nine.
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Weight-loss drug cuts type 2 diabetes
MedPage Today
The weight-loss drug Qsymia — combination of phentermine and topiramate extended release — reduced the incidence of type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese patients at high risk for the disease, researchers reported. In a subanalysis of a phase III trial, the drug markedly outperformed placebo in patients with either prediabetes or metabolic syndrome, according to W. Timothy Garvey, M.D., of the University of Alabama Birmingham, and colleagues.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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