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Farooqi Keynote: 40-70 percent of body weight is heritable
TOS & ASMBS

ASMBS and TOS Presidents with Dr. Farooqi
Dr. Sadaf Farooqi, a Professor at the University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories, began the ObesityWeek Opening Keynote Address on Wednesday on the genetic insights of energy homeostasis regulation with a critical question: What’s driving obesity prevalence?

Where rising obesity prevalence was previously patterned primarily on environmental factors, Dr. Farooqi sees evidence that genetic factors are currently playing a heavy role. Between 40-70 percent of body weight is heritable, mediated by such components as energy intake, satiety response, basal metabolic rate, response to exercise and even the response to bariatric surgery. To study these factors, Dr. Farooqi has been working with researchers around the world to recruit subjects for the Genetics of Obesity Study (GOOS), which has currently enrolled 7,000 children with severe obesity.

Leptin took center stage for much of Dr. Farooqi’s presentation, and a slide demonstrating the dramatic, rapid impact of leptin replacement therapy for those with a leptin deficiency drew gasps from the audience.

Moving forward, Dr. Farooqi will be studying obesity through the lens of thinness, which is also highly heritable. Her Study Into Lean and Thin Subjects (STILTS) has already developed a cohort of 1,500 subjects with BMI less than 18. With insights emerging from genetics, the environment, different pathways of physiological control, varying body sizes and more, Dr. Farooqi ended her keynote with a call for a strengthened commitment to interdisciplinary study – a perfect way to lead into the day’s sessions at ObesityWeek 2016.
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#OW2015 Research Spotlight: Eating dinner early, or skipping it, may be an effective weight loss strategy
TOS
The first human test of early time-restricted feeding found that this meal-timing strategy reduced swings in hunger and altered fat- and carb-burning patterns, which may help with losing weight. In early time-restricted feeding (eTRF), people eat their last meal by the midafternoon and don’t eat again until breakfast the next morning. The findings will be unveiled during an oral presentation from 3:45–5:15pm today at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2016 in New Orleans.

“Eating only during a much smaller window of time than people are typically used to may help with weight loss,” said Courtney Peterson, PhD, who led the study at Pennington Biomedical Research Center. “We found that eating between 8 am and 2 pm followed by an 18-hour daily fast kept appetite levels more even throughout the day, in comparison to eating between 8 am and 8 pm, which is what the median American does.”

This new research, funded by a TOS Early Career Research Grant awarded in 2014, suggests that eating a very early dinner, or even skipping dinner, may have some benefits for losing weight. The body has an internal clock, and many aspects of metabolism are at their optimal functioning in the morning. Therefore, eating in alignment with the body’s circadian clock by eating earlier in the day can positively influence health, and this new study of eTRF shows that this also applies to metabolism. This first test of eTRF in humans follows rodent studies of this approach to weight loss, which previously found that eTRF reduced fat mass and decreased the risk of chronic diseases in rodents.

Read more in the press release here.

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#OW2015 Research Spotlight: Insurance coverage of obesity, lack of formal diagnosis emerge as top barriers to getting professional weight loss help
TOS
Improving health insurance coverage for weight loss services could help people struggling with obesity lose weight, according to a new survey of nonphysician health professionals (HPs) by Ruchi Doshi, MPH. This is the first study to examine HP perspectives of insurance coverage as a facilitator or barrier for weight loss. In addition to current insurance coverage being perceived as a barrier, a second study by Bartolome Burguera, MD, PhD, found that three out of four patients are affected by obesity or overweight, yet less than half (48%) of these patients with a BMI higher than 30 received a formal diagnosis of obesity.

“These two barriers to care—no insurance for medical weight loss support and lack of initial diagnosis—can negatively impact people with obesity or overweight as they seek support from those most adept, trained weight loss professionals,” said Scott Kahan, MD, MPH, spokesperson for The Obesity Society and director at the National Center for Weight and Wellness. “While self-management strategies, such as following a commercial diet or increasing exercise, can help in some individuals, most people with obesity, especially those with severe obesity, can benefit from a comprehensive approach that includes healthcare professional support.”

Research results from these two studies are being presented this week at The Obesity Society Annual meeting at ObesityWeek℠ in New Orleans. Stop by EMCC Room 215-216 to see the oral presentation by Ruchi Doshi, Health Professionals’ Perceptions of Insurance Coverage for Weight Loss Services, today at 4:15pm.

Read more in the press release here.

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Don't miss this year's TOS/ASMBS joint sessions
TOS & ASMBS
This year at ObesityWeek, The Obesity Society and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery will be holding three joint sessions. In these sessions, TOS and ASMBS experts will: TOS and ASMBS also worked together this year to create an hourlong keynote discussion session designed to engage the full spectrum of ObesityWeek attendees: basic scientists, neuroscientists, clinicians, surgeons, integrated health professionals, population researchers and policy makers. The session will include a panel of leading scientists from TOS and ASMBS who will discuss a challenging case study with audience participation. The case will touch on complex issues related to surgery, weight loss and/or regain. This exciting discussion will take place on Friday, Nov. 4 from 11:00am–12:00pm in EMCC Great Hall A-D.
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Celebrate the final days of ObesityWeek at the AfterDark
TOS & ASMBS
Relax, unwind and celebrate all that you learned at the conference with your friends and colleagues at the AfterDark. This evening event offers live music and dancing to wrap up the final night of the meeting. This year’s event will be held at Generations Hall, an elegant, New-Orleans-style venue complete with the French Quarter’s finest décor, tonight from 9:00–11:59pm.

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Live Surgery Session, today and Friday
ASMBS
Experience live surgery from around the world with two panel sessions dedicated to dissecting surgical cases from Taiwan, South America and Europe. Each session will feature three cases via live telecast and then will be followed by discussion by moderators. Find more information here.
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Twitter Café today and Friday during breaks and lunches
ASMBS
Learn how to tweet with the best! Dr. Neil Floch will be in the Twitter Cafe showing how to effectively tweet in bariatric surgery. Be sure to use the hashtag #OW2016 to share your experience.
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Explore a subspecialty, congratulate poster award winners at TOS Section events
TOS
Each Section of The Obesity Society holds various meetings and networking events at ObesityWeek where researchers are honored with poster awards. Stop by the events held today at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside as well as the Convention Center to check out each Section’s poster award winners and network with others in the field. Each event is open to all!
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Trends in ObesityWeek science: All about genes
TOS
This year at ObesityWeek, genetics is a hot topic—as you heard in the Opening Keynote by Sadaf Farooqi, PhD, on Wednesday morning. If you’re interested in how genes affect obesity, you won’t want to miss these other three Scientific Sessions:

Genes Are Only One Piece of the Puzzle: From Universal to Precision Treatment for Weight Management
Nov. 3, 8:30–10:00am, EMCC Room 203-205
Presentations by Molly Bray, MD, MPH; Jason Vassy, PhD; Jeanne M. McCaffery, MD, PhD

Update on Genetic Syndromes for the Clinician
Nov. 3, 1:30–3:00pm, EMCC Room 211-213
Presentations by Joan C. Han, PhD; Jack Yanovski, PhD; Theresa V. Strong, PhD

Individuals in Environments: Novel Approaches to Exploring Gene × Environment Interactions
Nov. 4, 8:00–9:30am, EMCC Room 215-216
Presentations by Paul Franks, PhD; Patricia P. Silveira, PhD; Laurette Dube

Find out more about these and other ObesityWeek sessions through the interactive schedule.

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Treat Obesity Seriously™ & Sign the Obesity Pledge at TOS Member Services Booth
TOS
Do you treat obesity seriously? By signing the Obesity Pledge you can demonstrate your commitment to the cause and encourage your friends and colleagues to do the same. Add your voice to the many others who have signed on by saying:

"I believe obesity isn't just a problem. It's a disease that warrants serious evidence-based treatments. Nutritional and physical activity guidance. Intensive behavioral counseling. Drug therapy. And surgery. Agree to learn more and help more. I treat obesity seriously."

It's simple. Stop by The Obesity Society’s Member Services Booth, sign the pledge on the iPad and pick up your free lapel pin.

Not able to make it to the booth? Sign the pledge online with your mouse. Print your certificate and hang it on your office or practice wall. Share the pledge with your family, friends and colleagues. And send a letter to your member of Congress expressing your support for legislation that improves access to treatment for obesity.

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Look ahead at tomorrow:
TOS

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


For school children, weights rise along with summer temperatures
The New York Times
Summer is the season when children play outdoors tirelessly until nightfall, burning up all the energy they had stockpiled throughout the school year, right? Reality check: According to a new national study of younger elementary school students, the risk of gaining excessive weight is far greater during the summer then when they are in school.
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Lazy summer days mean weight gain for young kids
HealthDay News via WebMD
Summer vacation may bring unexpected weight gain for young children, a new study finds. Researchers tracked more than 18,000 children from the start of kindergarten through the end of second grade. They found that the kids' rate of overweight increased from 23 percent to 29 percent during that time. The researchers also saw that the rate of obesity rose from 9 percent to 11.5 percent.
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Study: Canola oil may trim belly fat
New York Daily News
Whittling your waistline might begin with pouring on the oil. Cooking with canola oil may cut belly fat in just four weeks, according to a Penn State report released at The Obesity Society's Annual Scientific Meeting on Wednesday. Canola oil, which is pressed from the yellow-flowered rapeseed plant, consists mostly of the good monounsaturated fats also found in olive oil, avocados and nuts that help to reduce bad cholesterol and decrease breast cancer risk.
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Canola oil may help trim belly fat
UPI
Including canola oil in your diet may help you lose abdominal fat in just four weeks, researchers at Penn State suggest in a new study. Canola oil has long been praised as a healthier alternative to other cooking oils such as vegetable oil or corn oil. In a study presented at The Obesity Society's Annual Scientific Meeting, scientists say consuming canola oil can provide a variety of benefits.
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Weight shaming falls as medical view of obesity grows
ConscienHealth
New research to be presented at ObesityWeek 2016 indicates that weight shaming may be easing a bit. At the same time, the public increasingly understands that obesity is a medical condition. Between 2013 and 2016, public perception of obesity as a “personal problem of bad choices” has dropped from 44 to 34 percent. On top of that, public agreement that people with obesity need medical help increased significantly over the last year.
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Body composition researcher honored at ObesityWeek
Healio
Steven B. Heymsfield, MD, FTOS, executive director of Pennington Biomedical Research Center, was awarded the George A. Bray Founders Award during ObesityWeek. This award is presented to individuals who have made contributions that advanced the scientific or clinical basis for understand or treating obesity and for extensive involvement with The Obesity Society (TOS).
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Genes associated with energy expenditure and weight gain identified
MED India
Obesity affects people of all ages, gender, and its prevalence has significantly increased in the recent years. Researchers have been conducting experiments to combat obesity, which increases the risk of metabolic disorders and death. For the first time, a study explored the link between genetics and calorie burn or energy expenditure. Researchers have identified a new potential pathway in the muscle tissue to improve the rate of energy expenditure.
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Obesity research: What you need to know
Healio
According to the CDC, more than one in three adults has obesity, putting them at risk for diseases such as certain types of cancer, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. This is not just a problem in adults; additional CDC research shows one in six children and adolescents is considered obese, too.
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ObesityWeek features interdisciplinary focus, cutting-edge science at annual meeting
Healio
ObesityWeek 2016 will offer attendees a mix of the latest obesity science and treatment research, featuring a roster of world-renowned experts addressing everything from genetics and nutrition to bariatric surgery and important public policy developments.
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Researcher from LSU's Pennington Biomedical awarded prestigious honor from The Obesity Society
Press Release Point
LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center scientist Dr. Steve Heymsfield has been awarded the 2016 George A. Bray Founders Award from The Obesity Society (TOS). The prestigious award was bestowed today during the ObesityWeek opening session in New Orleans. The TOS Founders Award is given to individuals who have made significant contributions to the scientific or clinical basis for understanding and treating obesity.
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