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ObesityWeek 2015 pricing information available
TOS
Registration for ObesityWeek will be here before you know it. In the meantime we've provided an estimate of our registration prices so you can start planning your travel. Please note: these prices are subject to change.

Attendees may register to join any of ObesityWeek's pre-conference courses — an á la carte selection of high-quality educational courses taking place before the commencement of the Scientific Sessions. Prices for these courses range from $65 - $650.

We've included a chart below with tentative prices for the ObesityWeek Scientific Sessions:



* All students must include proof of student status — for example, a student ID or a letter from your university verifying your status. Research support staff must also include proof of status — an institutional ID displaying your credentials, or a signed letter from your supervisor verifying your status, are sufficient. Military ID required to be eligible for military discount.

Additional registration details should be available at ObesityWeek.com in mid-June.
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It's not too late to submit your abstract to ObesityWeek
TOS
The ObesityWeek 2015 abstract submission period for ASMBS and TOS closed on May 4 and May 11, respectively. If you missed this chance to submit your latest obesity research you may still be eligible to submit your research during TOS's late-breaking abstract submission period.

Those who collect new data after May 11 may participate in TOS's late-breaking abstract submission process beginning August 3 and closing August 17. Late-breaking abstracts must describe new and high impact research based on data that was not available for the May 11 deadline. Keep an eye out on the ObesityWeek abstract submission page for additional details.

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CDC and NIH leaders discuss research funding opportunities at ObesityWeek
TOS
This year at ObesityWeek, representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) will hold a "Meet the Funders" Panel Symposium on Thursday, November 5 from 10:30 am – 12:00 pm. This all-new panel discussion will address new and emerging funding areas in obesity and provide tips for effectively navigating the submission process to secure research grants.

Topics and presenters include:
  • New and emerging funding areas in the basic and clinical sciences of obesity, Susan Yanovski, MD
  • Obesity research in the context of CDC prevention and healthcare efforts, Heidi Blanck, MS, PhD
  • RWJF's renewed investment in childhood obesity, Ginny Ehrlich, MS
  • PCORI obesity research directions, Romana Hasnain-Wynia, MS, PhD
  • New and persistent issues in the NIH review process, Fungai Chanetsa, PhD, MPH
  • You won't want to miss this exciting panel! Additional details are available here.

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    Attend the ASMBS & TOS joint session on bariatric surgery and addiction
    Contributed by Heike Munzberg, PhD
    Bariatric surgeries are markedly effective treatments for patients with obesity. Successes from these procedures include long-lasting weight loss, improved diabetes control and better quality of life. Thus, it is not surprising that the numbers of performed surgeries per year are steadily increasing. However, there is growing concern that bariatric surgery increases addictive behavior, specifically alcohol use.

    This problem raises several questions: Do all bariatric surgeries similarly increase addictive behavior? Are all patients equally at risk? What are the underlying central mechanisms for the addictive behavior?

    In the joint ASMBS and TOS session, "Out of the frying pan, into the bottle: Bariatric surgery and the risk of addition" to be held Friday, Nov. 6 from 1:30 – 3:00 pm, we have gathered three research experts on this topic. They will talk about their current work to address many of these raised questions.

    Dr. James Mitchel from the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine will address psychological aspects of bariatric surgery and addiction. Dr. Jon Davis from Washington State University will discuss some of his latest insights from rodent models on bariatric surgery and addiction. Dr. Christina Wee from Harvard Medical School will address long-term outcomes and quality of life in patients with bariatric surgeries.

    Additional information is available here.

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    Promoting people-first language at ObesityWeek 2015
    TOS
    Encouraging the use of people-first language in obesity has been a priority for TOS and ASMBS. ObesityWeek is one of the most prominent displays of obesity research. People-first language places the focus on individuals who have a condition, rather than defining them as the condition. This can be easily examined by looking at "obese" (e.g., obese children) compared to obesity (e.g., children with obesity).

    Looking at the ratio of the term "obese" to the term "obesity" in the abstracts at the last five meetings shows improvement in our use of people-first language. Here, a ratio of one would represent equal use of the two terms while a ratio closer to zero would represent greater use of the term "obese." Although inconsistent, the ratio has dropped from 0.79 in 2010 to 0.59 in 2014. This is a very encouraging finding.

    With preparations under way for ObesityWeek 2015, we want to encourage those attending to ensure appropriate use of people-first language. This meeting serves as a critical opportunity to promote by example. Recognizing the importance of the issue will hopefully lead to improved use of people first language in ObesityWeek 2015.

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    TOS Track 5 Feature: What's trending in weight loss — hype or help?
    Contributed by Sarah Barlow, MD, MPH
    Recent trends in pop culture promote novel methods to help with weight loss. In this TOS session on Tuesday, Nov. 3 from 3:30 – 5:00 pm, a series of speakers will critically examine the evidence behind what patients hope to be true.

    Dr. Laura Shane-McWhorter, a pharmacist, will discuss over-the-counter supplements, while Dr. Judith Wylie-Rosette, an epidemiologist, will discuss the latest popular diets. Dr. Martin Gibala, a physiologist, will present the research he has done on high-intensity, but short workouts.

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    TOS Track 4 Feature: Processed foods — opportunity or health risk?
    Contributed by Zhaohui Cui
    Processed foods are often discussed as either important contributors of critical micronutrients, or alternatively, as major sources of fat, sugar and salt. In this TOS session held Thursday, Nov. 5 from 3:45 – 5:15 pm, leading nutrition experts will present evidence that processed foods are both an opportunity and a health risk.

    Attendees will gain understanding of food science needed to engage in thoughtful debate and solution-oriented discussion of the role of processed foods in population health. The session will end with an interactive panel and audience discussion of policy, practice and research implications related to processed foods.

    Details are available here.

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    OBESITY IN THE NEWS


    'Thrifty' metabolism might sabotage weight loss efforts
    HealthDay News
    A new study confirms what many frustrated dieters already suspect: Your metabolism might make it tougher for you to lose weight than others. "The results corroborate the idea that some people who are obese may have to work harder to lose weight due to metabolic differences," said lead author Dr. Martin Reinhardt, a postdoctoral fellow at the Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch of the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
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    Why do more women than men have weight-loss surgery?
    HealthDay News
    New research suggests obese women might feel more compelled to have weight-loss surgery than their male counterparts do. Eighty percent of weight-loss surgery patients in the United States are women, the study authors said. Why?
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    Kids of moms with severe obesity are more at risk of ADHD
    Reuters via MSN
    Six-year-olds whose mothers were severely obese before pregnancy are more likely to have developmental or emotional problems than kids of healthy-weight moms, according to a new study. The researchers had found evidence of this link in two previous studies, said lead author Heejoo Jo of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia.
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    Obesity tied to risk of complications after plastic surgery
    HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
    Obese people who choose to have plastic surgery are 35 percent more likely than normal-weight people to have to visit the emergency room or be admitted to the hospital within 30 days after their operation, new research suggests. The findings highlight the importance of telling obese patients about the risks involved with such surgical procedures, the study authors said.
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    Computerized decision support tools improve BMI in children
    Healio
    An obesity intervention program that includes computerized clinical decision support for physicians as well as health coaching for families significantly improved BMI rates in obese children, according to new study findings. According to background information provided in the study, the prevalence of childhood obesity in the U.S. remains historically high and cost-effective, scalable clinical approaches for improving obesity rates in children are a public health priority. Yet, BMI interventions in children have not been proven effective in primary care.
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    Grocery lists can help people lose weight
    HealthCentral
    Taking a shopping list with you to the grocery store can lead to healthier food choices and promote more weight loss. Researchers from RAND Health Corporation took a survey of more than 1,300 Pittsburgh residents. Most participants were either overweight or obese, and lived in primarily African-American communities. Researchers also noted that the participants were selected from a population where 80 percent of people make less than $20,000 a year, and only 33 percent reported being employed.
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    When the default isn't fries and soda
    The Huffington Post
    What would kids eat if salads and strawberries replaced French fries on the menu? Most of them would order the salad and strawberries, finds a new study. When the default side was French fries 57 percent of kids' meal orders contained them. When it wasn't, only 22 percent of the kids insisted on getting the fries. The default is — by definition — the easy, non-choice, and when that default is healthier most kids go with it without complaint.
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