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ObesityWeek℠ 2016 pricing information now available
TOS & ASMBS
Registration for ObesityWeek 2016 will open any day now. In the meantime, we've provided our registration prices so you can start planning.

When registration opens, attendees can sign up for any of ObesityWeek's pre-conference courses – an á la carte selection of high-quality educational courses taking place before the commencement of the Scientific Sessions. Prices for these courses range from $65 – $650.

We've included a chart below with prices for the ObesityWeek Scientific Sessions:
Full pricing information is available here.

Please note all students must include proof of student status, for example a student ID or a letter from your university verifying your status. Research support staff must also include proof of status such as an institutional ID displaying your credentials or a signed letter from your supervisor verifying your status. Military ID is required to be eligible for military discount.

Additional registration details are coming soon at ObesityWeek.com.
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Submit your late-breaking research to ObesityWeek
TOS & ASMBS
Do you have new data that was not available during the regular TOS and ASMBS abstract submission periods? There is still time to submit your research for presentation at ObesityWeek.

ASMBS' Emerging Technologies Late-Breaking Abstracts submissions open until July 20

Submissions are open until July 20! Share your latest and greatest innovations in the Emerging Technologies Late-Breaking Abstracts Session, an addition to ObesityWeek 2016. Take advantage of this exciting opportunity to highlight your contributions to the bariatric surgery community. For more information, contact abstracts@asmbs.org.

TOS's late-breaking abstract submission site opens Aug. 1
TOS late-breaking abstract submission period for ObesityWeek 2016 will open Aug. 1 and close on Aug. 15, 2016 at 11:59 pm ET. Late-breaking abstracts must describe high-impact research for data that were not available or fully analyzed at the standard (May 2016) abstract deadline. Find additional details and abstract submission instructions here. Please note the submission link will not be available until the submission period opens on Aug. 1.

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Don't miss this year's TOS/ASMBS joint sessions
TOS & ASMBS
This year at ObesityWeek, TOS and ASMBS will be holding three joint sessions. In these sessions, TOS and ASMBS experts will:
  • Explore the utility of bariatric surgery in pediatric care in "Pediatric/Adolescent Obesity: When is the right time to consider surgery?" Nov. 2, 4 - 6 pm (TBC)
  • Discuss biological barriers to long-term weight maintenance in "Weight Regain with Bariatric Surgery," Nov. 3, 1:30 - 3 pm
  • Focus on an NIH-initiated effort to develop a core set of constructs/measures to weight-loss studies in "Toward Optimizing Long-Term Obesity Treatment: Measuring Core Variable in Adult Weight Loss Trials," Nov. 4, 8 - 9:30 am
TOS and ASMBS also worked together this year to create an hour-long discussion session designed to engage the full spectrum of ObesityWeek attendees: basic scientists, neuroscientists, clinicians, surgeons, integrated health professionals, population researchers and policy makers. The session will include a panel of leading scientists from TOS and ASMBS who will discuss a challenging case study with audience participation. The case will touch on complex issues related to surgery, weight loss and/or regain. This exciting discussion will take place on Friday, Nov. 4 from 11 am – 12 pm CT.

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Stay connected with ObesityWeek
TOS & ASMBS
Excited about ObesityWeek? Follow us on Facebook and Twitter, and then tell us what you are most excited about. Can't wait to hear the latest research at the Scientific Sessions? Excited to connect with peers at the social events? Tell us using the hashtag #OW2016 to be featured on ObesityWeek's official Twitter account.

You can also sign up to receive ObesityWeek email updates, and keep an eye out for the ObesityWeek mobile app (coming soon!).

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TOS Early Career Academic Workshop helps early career obesity professionals plan for the future
TOS
This TOS pre-conference workshop has something for everyone in academia, or anyone considering an academic path. This year, we are honored to have Dr. David Allison from the University of Alabama at Birmingham present at the workshop. Dr. Allison is an Associate Dean for Science, Director of the Nutrition Obesity Research Center and the Office of Energetics, and the Principal Investigator on several training grants. The Academic Workshop will also include a roundtable session with discussions and hands-on activities.

Finally, you can get a head start on networking at ObesityWeek with a meet-and-greet session at the Workshop with representatives from TOS's Sections, the Early Career Member Committee and TOS Fellows. Plan your travel so that you can attend the Early Career Academic Workshop on Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2:30 - 4:45 pm. This event is free; all are welcome. Be sure to add this event to your itinerary when ObesityWeek registration opens.

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Join TOS & ASMBS and save
TOS & ASMBS
Did you know that members of TOS and ASMBS get special discounts to attend ObesityWeek? Both organizations support professionals and specialists working in the field of obesity, offering networking and leadership opportunities, as well as access to news and resources. Find out more about member benefits and decide which organization is right for you.
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Oct. 31 & Nov. 1: TOS gets you ready for the American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) Certification Exam
TOS
Certification as a Diplomate by the American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) distinguishes a physician as having achieved a high level of competency and understanding in obesity care. Here's what you need to know about the 2016 certification exam:
  • The exam will be offered Dec. 3-10, 2016 at computer-based testing centers throughout the U.S. and Canada.
  • The early application deadline is July 15, 2016, and the final application deadline is Aug. 30, 2016.
  • You can access the application portal here.
  • You can learn more about ABOM eligibility requirements here.
  • Before you can take the ABOM Certification Exam in December, you must obtain 60 CME credits.
As a pre-conference to ObesityWeek, TOS offers a Review Course for the ABOM exam for 15.5 CME credits. Taught by the industry's top educators, the Course is designed to strengthen physicians' obesity knowledge and offers sample exam questions, didactic lectures, and a 100-page educational workbook for attendees to take home.

ObesityWeek attendees may use the CME credits from the meeting to count toward their 60 CME credits required to sit for the ABOM exam, even though the conference takes place after ABOM's final application deadline of Aug. 30. When you register for ObesityWeek 2016, be sure to add TOS's Review Course for the ABOM Exam to your schedule. Find out more ABOM here.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Anti-obesity drugs may help 'kick start' weight loss
Healthline
If you've ever announced to the world – maybe on social media – that you wanted to shed a few pounds, you may have heard this advice from your friends: eat healthier and exercise more. It seems like a simple way to lose weight. The same way tackling Mount Everest is just a matter of hiking farther and climbing higher. For many people who have obesity or are overweight, though, getting that first toehold toward a healthier weight – as well as a lower risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and some types of cancer – seems like an insurmountable task.
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Weight loss drugs: Which ones actually work?
Medical Daily via MSN
Everywhere you look, there are advertisements for new workouts, diet plans, and weight loss supplements. It's for good reason – more than one-third of American adults have obesity. If you're hoping to shed a few pounds, though, the barrage of options can be daunting, and it may be difficult to choose the one that's best. In a new study, researchers from the University of California, San Diego tested the five pharmacological options that are currently approved for managing obesity in the United States. They all work, but the research found some are more effective than others.
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FDA approves stomach-draining obesity treatment
Deseret News
A new weight loss device offers a novel approach to cutting calories: draining them from the stomach before they are fully digested. The AspireAssist system consists of a thin tube implanted in the stomach, connecting to an outside port on the skin of the belly. About 20 minutes after finishing a meal, users connect the port to an external device, which drains some of the recently-consumed food into the toilet.
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Teen obesity may mean liver disease later
HealthDay
Older teen boys who are overweight or have obesity could be at increased risk for severe liver disease later in life, a new study suggests. The research included nearly 45,000 Swedish males who entered military service in their late teens between 1969 and 1970. The investigators reviewed over 40 years of their health information. Nearly 400 of them were diagnosed with severe liver disease, the study authors said. Men who were overweight or obese in their late teens were 64 percent more likely to develop severe liver disease compared with men who had a low normal weight in their late teens. The researchers said that worked out to a 5 percent increased risk for every one point increase in body mass index.
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Doctors call for obesity, or 'metabolic,' surgery to become more routine diabetes treatment
Medical Daily
While bariatric surgery's primary goal is to aid in weight loss and treat obesity, a growing body of evidence suggests that it may also be an effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes as well. A new review written by a team of researchers led by Dr. David Cummings, an endocrinologist at the University of Washington, sets out guidelines about obesity surgery as a viable treatment option for diabetes. "We do not claim that surgery should be the first-line therapy," Cummings said, according to the AP. But because standard care in the past consisting of diet and exercise doesn't always work, "it's time for something new." The guidelines, published in the journal Diabetes Care, were endorsed by the American Diabetes Association, the International Diabetes Federation, and 43 other health organizations, suggesting that making the treatment more routine is well supported by the medical world.
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Philadelphia becomes first major city to pass soda tax
USA Today
Philadelphia recently became the first major U.S. city to approve a tax on soft drinks. By a vote of 13-4, the Philadelphia City Council approved a 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax that will affect sodas and other sugary drinks, including teas, sports drinks and energy drinks. Drinks exempt from the tax are those that are more than 50 percent fruit juice, vegetable juice or milk, said Lauren Hitt, the communications director for the mayor's office.
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Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Chelsea Clark, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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