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#OW2015 Research Spotlight: Stressed parent? New research shows your children may be twice as likely to have obesity
TOS
Prior research has shown that stress is associated with obesity in adults, and now for the first time, research suggests Latino parents who feel high levels of stress are twice as likely to have children with obesity as well. Researchers led by Carmen Isasi, MD, PhD, from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, examined data from the Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth), a study funded by the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of NIH, to determine the relationship between parental stress and child weight status in the Latino population. The findings will be presented during a poster presentation today at noon at ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles.

"Obesity and chronic stress were both prevalent among this Latino population, with more than one-quarter (28%) of children ages 8-16 with obesity, and nearly one-third (29%) of their parents reporting high levels of stress,” said Dr. Isasi. "This study is among the first of its kind to show that parental stress is a risk factor for childhood obesity among Latinos, and adds to the understanding of family influences on child weight status."

Find out more in the press release here.
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#OW2015 Research Spotlight: Adolescent bariatric surgery reverses Type 2 diabetes in 95 percent of teens, achieves major weight loss and improves quality of life
Contributed by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
The results of a new study to be published today in The New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles, California, show that three years after undergoing bariatric surgery, adolescents experienced major improvements in their weight, metabolic health, and quality of life.

Teen-LABS (Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery), a multi-center clinical study examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures, is the largest and most comprehensive analysis of bariatric outcomes to date in adolescents. The study enrolled 242 adolescents, ages 13 to 19, all of whom had severe obesity with an average weight of 325 pounds before surgery. The participants had an average body mass index (BMI) of 53 kg/m2.

Three years after surgery, average weight had decreased by more than 90 pounds, or 27 percent. Most participants also had reversal of a number of important obesity-related health problems. Reversal of Type 2 diabetes was seen in 95 percent of participants, and normalization of kidney function was seen in 86 percent. Hypertension corrected in 74 percent and lipid abnormalities reversed in 66 percent.

Read more in the press release here, and attend the ObesityWeek session at 1:45 pm this afternoon in LACC Room 502A.

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Congratulations TOS award recipients!
TOS
Yesterday at ObesityWeek, TOS presented awards to four leaders in the field of obesity for their exemplary work in obesity treatment and prevention. Congratulations to these esteemed individuals:
  • 2015 Mickey Stunkard Lifetime Achievement Award: Thorkild I.A. Sørensen, MD, ScD, Institute of Preventative Medicine
  • 2015 Atkinson-Stern Award for Distinguished Public Service: Louis J. Aronne, MD, Weill Cornell Medical College
  • 2015 TOPS Research Achievement Award: Andrew Greenberg, MD, Tufts University
  • 2015 Master of the American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM): William H. Dietz, MD, PhD, Washington University
  • This morning, TOS will present additional awards to recipients of the Ethan Sims Young Investigator Award, the Thomas A. Wadden Award for Distinguished Mentorship and the 2015 Lilly Scientific Achievement Award. Don't miss the session this morning at 8:00am in the LACC Concourse Room 150/151.

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    Media messages: How to handle star struck patients
    Contributed by Rajiv Narayan, MSc
    ObesityWeek attendees are well aware of the media hype surrounding weight loss. In yesterday's ObesityWeek session titled "Media Messages: How to Handle Star Struck Patients," co-chairs Dr. Louis Arrone and Dr. Michelle Cardell convened a panel drawing on diverse experiences.

    First, Marianne Smith-Edge, MS, RD, LD, FADA, presented consumer survey data from the International Food Information Council Foundation. Among her many insights, she explained that who consumers get their information from is not the same as who they say they trust. She also noted that a majority of Americans would rather hear what they should eat than what they should not eat, and millennials are highly skeptical of nutrition information from any source.

    Next on the panel was Dr. Madelyn Fernstrom, who gave a behind-the-scenes perspective. For example, broadcast news is subject to far more rigorous messaging regulations than either entertainment or syndication media. With the line between these forms blurring, it becomes all the more important for prudent researchers to both participate in and be vigilant about how their expertise is being utilized.

    Dr. Martin Binks rounded out the session by reviewing TOS's Position Statement on the need to build FDA and FTC capacity to rigorously scrutinize dietary supplements and other weight loss products. He also identified media hype as an opportunity to engage patients. His advice to attendees? Help patients understand how they might take action in light of a landscape of misleading claims.

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    Mobile app refresher
    ASMBS & TOS
    Remember to download the ObesityWeek℠ mobile app! The app is available in the iOS App Store and on Google Play when you search "ObesityWeek." The app includes a full session schedule, interactive maps, speaker information, and more. You can also use the app to submit questions during some sessions and receive updates from ObesityWeek. The app will provide the latest, up-to-date information on any changes to the ObesityWeek Schedule, making it a great tool for planning your schedule for the week.
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    OAC hosts FREE one-day patient educational event at ObesityWeek
    Contributed by the Obesity Action Coalition
    In conjunction with ObesityWeek, the Obesity Action Coalition (OAC) is offering individuals in the greater Los Angeles community the opportunity to learn at YWMLocal – Los Angeles 2015, a FREE half-day educational event presenting weight management strategies led by the country's leading experts, so attendees can rest assured that they are receiving information driven by science and research.

    Attendees of YWMLocal – Los Angeles will receive valuable educational information on a broad spectrum of weight and health topics, including:
    • What weight management options to consider and how to choose the best option for you and your health
    • Helpful nutrition and dietary tips and guidelines
    • Motivating exercise information and demonstrations
    • Motivational and inspirational messages
    • And much more!
    The OAC invites you to attend YWMLocal – Los Angeles 2015, a unique opportunity for you to learn information from your peers just as your patients do. The OAC also encourages you to share this event with your patients in or near the greater Los Angeles area, so they can join with you and take the next step in learning evidence-based information about their weight and health.

    YWMLocal – Los Angeles 2015 will be held on Saturday, Nov. 7, from 8:00am to noon at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Register for this free event today!

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    ASMBS, TOS and other OCC groups take aim at states that deny coverage of obesity treatment
    ASMBS & TOS
    Earlier this month, TOS, ASMBS and others in the Obesity Care Continuum (OCC) filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) claiming the 27 states that deny coverage for bariatric surgery are not in non-compliance with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The complaint by the OCC suggests that their failure to comply is discriminatory against people with disabilities, and violates the ban against denying coverage based on health status or a pre-existing condition.

    Find out more in the press release from ASMBS here.

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    OBESITY IN THE NEWS


    Teen obesity surgery benefits last at least 3 years
    The Detriot News
    The largest, longest study of teen obesity surgery shows huge weight loss and health gains can last at least three years, and many say it's worth the risks. "I feel awesome. It's like a new life," said Miranda Taylor, a Cincinnati nursing student in the study who had surgery when she was 16 and weighed 265 pounds. She lost more than 100 pounds, along with severe depression, pre-diabetes and an obesity-related hormonal condition.
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    Doctors must treat obesity with science and compassion
    Los Angeles Daily News
    For as long as she can remember, Michelle Vicari was the "chubby girl." She was always the biggest kid in her class — an overweight teen who gained even more during college. But today, she has lost 158 pounds and is off the assortment of medications she once depended on to manage several weight-related health issues, including high blood pressure and obstructive sleep apnea. Michelle has not been to the doctor for anything more than routine checkups in almost a decade.
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    The obesity disconnect between patients and doctors
    ConscienHealth
    A team of leading obesity experts and advocates for people with obesity are presenting qualitative research today at ObesityWeek that suggests a profound disconnect between people with obesity and their doctors. While doctors see obesity through a lens of health and disease, people with obesity see it more through a lens of lifestyle and social relationships.
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    Nestlé Health Science announces initiation of year-long OPTI-WIN clinical trial for weight loss and maintenance
    Nestlé Health Science
    Nestlé Health Science recently announced it will begin enrolling participants in a new clinical trial on its OPTIFAST® Program. This year-long study, named OPTI-WIN, will evaluate the effectiveness of the OPTIFAST Program on weight loss and maintenance in comparison with a modified Diabetes Prevention Program, a recognized standard lifestyle intervention. The announcement comes during ObesityWeek 2015, the largest gathering of physicians, surgeons and other healthcare professionals from around the world dedicated to the latest research and care of people with obesity.
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    Electrical brain stimulation may help patients lose weight
    Popular Science via MSN
    Many factors can cause obesity, including genes, lifestyle and environment. But there's some evidence to suggest that quirks of the brain might be a factor, too. In fact, doctors may be able to stimulate the brain so that patients lose weight, according to a study published today in the journal Obesity and led by researchers from the National Institutes of Health.
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    Your DNA may explain high-calorie food cravings
    HealthDay News
    Can't resist high-fat, sugary foods? Your genetic makeup may be to blame. Researchers say they've identified a pair of genetic variants that interact to boost the brain's reward responses to foods high in fat and sugar. They believe the findings might lead to new treatments for obesity. The two genetic variants are located near the FTO gene, which is associated with increased risk of obesity, and the DRD2 gene, the researchers said.
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    TOS, ASMBS leadership kick off ObesityWeek opening session
    Healio
    John Morton, MPH, MD, FACS, president of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Nikhil Dhurandhar, PhD, president of The Obesity Society, opened their joint ObesityWeek annual meeting "You are here at the world's largest gathering for health care professionals dedicated to the study and science and care of the obese patient," Morton said.
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    Cell-phone app doesn't aid weight-loss in obese youth
    Medscape
    In a randomized controlled trial of overweight and obese 18- to 35-year-olds, two behavior-modification strategies using cell phones did not lead to greater 2-year weight loss compared with "low-tech" written advice. Specifically, the Cell Phone Interaction for You trial randomized close to 400 youth to receive one of three weight-loss strategies: An intervention delivered by interactive smartphone application specifically designed by the research group ("cell-phone" intervention), personal coaching enhanced by smartphone self-monitoring ("personal-coaching" intervention), or simply a three-page handout (control) — all promoting healthy eating and more exercise.
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    Balloon you can swallow fights obesity
    NBC News
    A new type of stomach-filling balloon can help people drop pounds, and it doesn't require any surgery to place it, researchers reported. Patients can just swallow the deflated balloon, and doctors can use a narrow catheter to fill it with water. The balloon makes it harder to overeat. A study presented at the ObesityWeek meeting in Los Angeles shows the "balloon pill" works at least as well as other stomach balloons to help people lose weight.
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    Obesity epidemic turning around, but whole person, whole community approach next step
    Healio
    There has been a "sea change" on obesity prevention and treatment in communities, on the policy side and in industry, according to Loel S. Solomon, PhD, MPP, community health vice president for Kaiser Permanente's Community Benefit Program, who presented a keynote address during the ObesityWeek 2015 opening session. “No longer do people see obesity as a failure of individual will,” Solomon said.
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    3 out of 4 consumers not covered for evidence-based obesity treatment services
    News-Medical.Net
    In one of the largest studies ever conducted to better understand insurance coverage of obesity treatments, researchers found that three out of four consumers report that they are not covered for necessary, evidence-based obesity treatment services, including access to a registered dietitian, medical weight management, bariatric surgery or FDA-approved obesity drugs. The findings will be presented during an oral presentation at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles.
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    Access to bariatric surgery remains difficult for many with obesity
    Healio
    It is estimated that some 20 million Americans have a BMI of more than 40 kg/m², yet less than 1 percent of eligible patients with obesity undergo bariatric surgery, according to a presenter at ObesityWeek. Lloyd Stegemann, MD, FACS, FASMBS, of the Better Weigh Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, said several factors might explain why more people with obesity do not consider bariatric surgery as an option, including barriers to access, and patient or even physician mindsets regarding the procedure.
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