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Share your feedback from 2016, start planning for 2017
ASMBS & TOS
Thank you for making ObesityWeek℠ 2016 a huge success! Each year TOS and ASMBS work hard to improve and refine the meeting to meet the needs of our attendees. Your feedback is important to our success; please take 5 minutes to complete the exit survey here.

We are already looking forward to ObesityWeek 2017 in our nation's capital. Mark your calendars: ObesityWeek will be in National Harbor, MD (Washington, DC) from Oct. 30 - Nov. 3, 2017.
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The Obesity Society's Symposium & Speaker Suggestion Site is now open for ObesityWeek 2017
TOS
ObesityWeek 2016 was a great success and we could not have done it without you! Now it's time to look to the future and start planning for our 2017 meeting. The Annual Program Committee is now accepting suggestions for topic areas, symposia and potential speakers. We would like to request your symposia suggestions right away!

These submitted symposia will be highlighted in the 2017 program. The Program Committee will continue to develop key lectures and symposia; the topics and speakers for those sessions will be informed by suggestions from TOS Sections, members and partners. Therefore, please submit your ideas through the symposia suggestion submission system, as the Program Committee relies heavily on these suggestions to develop the program. The deadline for submission is Dec. 23, 2016 at 11:59pm EST.

Visit the Symposium & Speaker Suggestion Site here, and read the submission guidelines here.

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Submit your IH Symposium Suggestions for ObesityWeek 2017
ASMBS
The Integrated Health Program and Professional Education committee is planning for ObesityWeek 2017. We have a few one-and-a-half-hour open Scientific Session slots in the program to complete, and we would like to hear your ideas for topics.

Be prepared to include credentials, place of business and e-mail addresses for all suggested speakers. Please complete the attached proposal, and submit it directly to education@asmbs.org for review.

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Stay connected with ObesityWeek, ASMBS and TOS throughout the year!
ASMBS & TOS
Don’t miss out on important updates!

Follow ObesityWeek on Facebook and Twitter to stay up to date with the latest news and information regarding the meeting, including abstract submission timelines, keynote speakers and social events!

Stay in touch with ASMBS all yearlong. To receive announcements and news from ASMBS, subscribe to emails, and cater your subscription by selecting the email categories you'd like to receive. Also, access exclusive content only featured on ASMBS social media. Be sure to follow ASMBS on Twitter and LinkedIn, and like the ASMBS Facebook page.

You can keep in touch with TOS year round by subscribing to the Society's email newsletter here and following TOS on Facebook @The Obesity Society and Twitter @ObesitySociety. TOS Members can also connect in the all-new Open Forum in TOS Connect, the exclusive online community for active members. Login to the community at tosconnect.obesity.org or find out how to join here.

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Farooqi Keynote: 40-70 percent of body weight is heritable
TOS & ASMBS

Dr. Farooqi with ObesityWeek chairs
Dr. Sadaf Farooqi, a Professor at the University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories, began the ObesityWeek Opening Keynote Address on Nov. 2 on the genetic insights of energy homeostasis regulation with a critical question: What’s driving obesity prevalence?

Where rising obesity prevalence was previously patterned primarily on environmental factors, Dr. Farooqi sees evidence that genetic factors are currently playing a heavy role. Between 40-70 percent of body weight is heritable, mediated by such components as energy intake, satiety response, basal metabolic rate, response to exercise and even the response to bariatric surgery. To study these factors, Dr. Farooqi has been working with researchers around the world to recruit subjects for the Genetics of Obesity Study (GOOS), which has currently enrolled 7,000 children with severe obesity.

Leptin took center stage for much of Dr. Farooqi’s presentation, and a slide demonstrating the dramatic, rapid impact of leptin replacement therapy for those with a leptin deficiency drew gasps from the audience.

Moving forward, Dr. Farooqi will be studying obesity through the lens of thinness, which is also highly heritable. Her Study Into Lean and Thin Subjects (STILTS) has already developed a cohort of 1,500 subjects with BMI less than 18. With insights emerging from genetics, the environment, different pathways of physiological control, varying body sizes and more, Dr. Farooqi ended her keynote with a call for a strengthened commitment to interdisciplinary study – a perfect way to lead into the day’s sessions at ObesityWeek 2016.

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Journal Symposium winners exemplify diversity of research at ObesityWeek
Andrew Pool

Ken Fujioka, MD, presents at Obesity Journal Symposium
It was standing room only at the Obesity Journal Symposium, where five investigators presented their exciting new research chosen as winners of the annual competition sponsored by TOS’s official journal. This year’s top papers addressed the full complexity of obesity, from a basic science level to the population level.

Ken Fujioka, MD, kicked off the Symposium by examining the early response criterion for predicting clinically meaningful weight loss with liraglutide 3.0 at 56 weeks of treatment and comparing efficacy outcomes for early responders and nonresponders. His research team determined that a ≥4% weight loss at week 16 was the best predictor for clinically meaningful weight loss at 56 weeks. Further, they identified that early responders experienced greater mean weight losses and improved cardiometabolic outcomes and health-related quality of life compared to early nonresponders.

Next Kevin Hall, PhD, presented research showing that appetite increases by 100 calories per day for each kilogram of lost weight. Diets high in monounsaturated fatty acids may benefit adults at risk for the metabolic syndrome, according to a feeding study by Xiaoran Liu, PhD. In a randomized controlled trial, Patrick O’Neil, PhD, determined that a Weight Watchers program improves outcomes for adults with type 2 diabetes. Finally, Dr. Paul von Hippel, PhD, presented his noteworthy research on the summertime increase in obesity prevalence among children. With talks from a range of disciplines, this symposium truly exemplified the research diversity present at ObesityWeek 2016.

Read the full papers online here.

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All-new ObesityWeek Keynote Discussion illustrates that treating obesity is anything but easy
Rajiv Narayan
The ObesityWeek Keynote Discussion began with TOS and ASMBS immediate past presidents Penny Gordon-Larsen, PhD, and Raul Rosenthal, MD, helping frame the session by pointing to survey data indicating patient discomfort with medical intervention — 17 percent of Americans consider prescription medicines safe, and only 30 percent view surgery as safe. Motivated to facilitate dialogue about and with patients, they moved to a case study involving two hypothetical patients. During this session, the audience was invited to engage using an interactive online polling system.

The two case studies involved a husband and wife, both with severe obesity. The wife underwent a sleeve gastrectomy and experienced successful weight loss, but her diabetes did not go into remission. Her husband also went in for bariatric surgery, and is expected to lose 50 pounds before undergoing a hip replacement. The details of the case gave rise to rich discussion on treatment options, clinical concerns, and societal implications.

Speaking to the wife’s case details, TOS President-elect Caroline Apovian, MD, used the opportunity to counsel on appropriate drugs for managing depression in light of weight concerns, citing drugs that don’t contribute to weight gain (Wellbutrin, for example) as superior to those that do (Zyprexa).

Donna Ryan, MD, was asked why diabetes doesn’t go into remission for everyone, a question that allowed her to speak to the role of weight regain in glycemic control and the underlying level of beta cell dysfunction prior to weight loss. To her, this factor gives all the more reason to undergo surgery earlier in the disease course.

For the husband’s case, Richard Bergman, PhD, offered more discussion on diabetes and bariatric surgery, adding that he would want to see more information about beta cell function for a patient with low glycemic control without very high blood sugar. Fellow scientist Hans-Rudolf Berthoud, PhD, agreed, asking for a better understanding of what may be driving this patient’s obesity. The case history suggested that genetic factors may be in play, but the physician would benefit from know about the balance of food intake, energy expenditure, and energy metabolism.

Bill Dietz, MD, PhD, broadened the discussion beyond the case at hand, raising questions about the children of these parents, and the shame these patients may be exposed to. To them, the panel, and the audience, the discussion ended with a reflection on bringing the discussion to the patients themselves, with a plea for shared decision-making.

The Keynote Discussion demonstrated that obesity clinicians and scientists must account for a panoply of factors when providing counsel and support to patients. Keeping in line with the theme nearly all conference speakers echoed, this suggests a need for more further research and better evidence that can bring greater clarity, as well as increased public awareness and social support around complex individual, social and environmental mediators of obesity. As such, the biggest panel session of ObesityWeek in The Big Easy illustrated that obesity is anything but easy.

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Save the Date - ASMBS Spring Meeting
ASMBS
The ASMBS Annual Spring Event will be hosted in sunny California. ASMBS Week-End, formally referred to as Obesity Week-End, will take place June 8-10 in San Diego, CA. The 3-day conference dissects the disease of obesity in an intimate setting. Attendees will enjoy networking events and the vast educational opportunities without the overwhelming crowds. For further information, visit the ASMBS website in January, and subscribe to the email list (select ASMBS Meetings to receive specialized content).
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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


For schoolchildren, weights rise along with summer temperatures
The New York Times
Summer is the season when children play outdoors tirelessly until nightfall, burning up all the energy they had stockpiled throughout the school year, right? Reality check: According to a new national study of younger elementary school students, the risk of gaining excessive weight is far greater during the summer than when they are in school.
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Americans blame obesity on willpower, despite evidence it's genetic
The New York Times
Americans believe that obesity is tied with cancer as the biggest health threat in the nation today. But though scientific research shows that diet and exercise are insufficient solutions, a large majority say fat people should be able to summon the willpower to lose weight on their own. The findings are from a nationally representative survey of 1,509 adults released by NORC at the University of Chicago, an independent research institution.
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Fat shaming, explained in one terrible tweet
Vox
Julia Belluz writes: "This week, North America’s leading obesity researchers gathered in New Orleans for Obesity Week, their most important conference of the year. I was there, and one of the topics that permeated the meeting was how our biases against people with obesity can be a real barrier to their health care."
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No shortage of barriers to professional help with weight loss
MedPage Today
There was a significant gap between patients and healthcare professionals when it came to perceptions of obesity care and management, researchers reported here. In the U.S.-based, online Awareness, Care, and Treatment In Obesity Management survey, 73 percent of patients with obesity reported that they had discussed weight with a healthcare provider, but 36 percent stated that they did not seek support from that provider for weight loss, according to Lee Kaplan, MD, PhD, of the Massachusetts General Hospital Weight Center in Boston, and colleagues.
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Weight Watchers plus diabetes education substantially improves glycemic control
Healio
Combination of a well-known weight-loss program plus diabetes education can improve weight loss as well as control of type 2 diabetes in adults with the disease, according to a presenter here. “We know that current guidelines for diabetes recommend diabetes education and nutrition therapy, but it’s found that many patients get none and most get very, very little,” Patrick M. O’Neil, PhD, co-chair of the ObesityWeek Board of Managers and past president of The Obesity Society, said during his presentation.
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Study: A super-early dinner can burn more fat
TIME
Eating all your meals within a six-hour window sounds like some sort of fad diet (and a recipe for midnight fridge raids). But a small new study suggests that having your dinner before 2 p.m. – or skipping it entirely – actually reduces hunger cravings and boosts fat burn. Before you sign on for the super early–bird special, however, here’s what you should know.
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Soda sales go slightly flat after added tax
MedPage Today
While sales of sugar-sweetened beverages were down in the 6 months following taxes on these drinks in Berkeley, California, overall beverage sales and store revenue changes were negligible, a preliminary analysis of sales data presented here found.
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Early response to liraglutide predicted significant weight loss later
Endocrinology Advisor
Patients who lost weight with liraglutide early on in the SCALE trials experienced greater cardiometabolic benefits at 56 weeks compared with those who did not, according to study results presented at ObesityWeek 2016 and published simultaneously in Obesity.
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Obesity, bias and stigma in the doctor's office: Take 5 for better care
The Huffington Post
William Dietz writes: "My friend and colleague, Patty Nece, has described an experience that’s exemplary of how people with obesity often do not get appropriate care from doctors, nurses or other providers. An orthopedist, without ever conducting an exam, quickly decided that Patty’s hip discomfort was 'obesity pain,' that she needed to lose weight, and suggested she consider weight-loss surgery."
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Weight loss in untreated spouses tied to interventions in partners
Healio
The effects of weight loss in adults randomly assigned to Weight Watchers or self-guided weight loss may have an impact on untreated spouses' weight loss. "We actually know quite a bit about different relationships and how weight might function within certain relationships," Amy Gorin, PhD, associate professor at the University of Connecticut, said during her presentation.
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Study: Canola oil may trim belly fat
New York Daily News
Whittling your waistline might begin with pouring on the oil. Cooking with canola oil may cut belly fat in just four weeks, according to a Penn State report released at The Obesity Society's Annual Scientific Meeting. Canola oil, which is pressed from the yellow-flowered rapeseed plant, consists mostly of the good monounsaturated fats also found in olive oil, avocados and nuts that help to reduce bad cholesterol and decrease breast cancer risk.
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Weight shaming falls as medical view of obesity grows
ConscienHealth
New research to be presented at ObesityWeek 2016 indicates that weight shaming may be easing a bit. At the same time, the public increasingly understands that obesity is a medical condition. Between 2013 and 2016, public perception of obesity as a “personal problem of bad choices” has dropped from 44 to 34 percent. On top of that, public agreement that people with obesity need medical help increased significantly over the last year.
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Kids less likely to be obese when dad is active parent
MedPage Today
Young children whose fathers were more involved in "physical childcare tasks," such as bathing and dressing them, were less likely to be obese, a researcher said here. Greater involvement of fathers in such tasks was associated with less risk of childhood obesity from age 2 to age 4, reported Jessica Jones-Smith, PhD, of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, and colleagues.
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10 top highlights of ObesityWeek 2016
ConscienHealth
ObesityWeek in New Orleans was a feast of new information and perspectives for people who devote their careers to understanding and solving the challenge of obesity. The highlights were many and different for every attendee. Here are ten for your consideration.
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The latest weight news from ObesityWeek 2016
HealthCentral
A survey presented at the ObesityWeek 2016 conference suggests that “lack of a formal diagnosis” is one of the major barriers to treatment of obesity. The second major roadblock is lack of insurance coverage for care associated with a diagnosis of obesity. Separate research suggests it’s also not “all about willpower.”
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Top 5 online stories from ObesityWeek
Healio
Endocrine Today has compiled a list of the top five news reports from ObesityWeek. Readers were interested in the effects of non-nutritive sweeteners, the effect of a diet coupled with physical activity and much more.
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Can we harness our genes to burn more calories?
USAgNet
Researchers say they have identified a potential pathway in our muscle tissue to improve the rate at which our bodies burn calories. The study is one of the first to explore the tie between genetics and calorie burn (or energy expenditure), a relatively new area of biological study. The findings of the study were unveiled during a poster presentation at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2016 in New Orleans.
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Guarding the floodgates against obesity care
ConscienHealth
"If all the patients that need bariatric surgery demanded it, they would bankrupt our health system." This is a jarring perspective from a primary care physician in leadership at a large, nonprofit health plan. He confirmed that they are quite successful guarding the floodgates against all the people who need medical and surgical obesity care.
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Patients lose double the weight, keep it off with swallowed balloons
Healio
Patients who used the Obalon balloon system lost almost twice as much weight as patients who adopted diet, exercise and lifestyle changes, and they maintained their weight loss through 12 months, according to research presented at ObesityWeek.
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