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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit   January 01, 2015



 
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As 2014 comes to a close, the publisher of the VACEP eNews would like to wish its readers, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the VACEP eNews a look at the most-accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 15, 2015.


1. Google yourself, and 5 other habits of highly successful emergency physicians
ACEP
From Nov. 6: Michael Silverman, M.D., FACEP, has run a few marathons, but he knows that when he’s training, it can affect how well he does his day job: chairman of the emergency department at Virginia Hospital Center for Emergency Medicine Associates in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. Silverman pointed that out in his ACEP 2014 session, “Top Five Habits of Highly Successful Emergency Physicians,” to demonstrate the value he ascribes to self-reflection.
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2. Top 10 emergency medicine apps
iMedicalApps
From Sept. 25: The following is a list of 10 essential medical apps emergency medicine providers should have on their smartphones. Links to iPhone and Android platforms are provided for each app. The apps are listed based on experiences working in the emergency room and the app reviews that have been done prior at iMedicalApps.
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3. The effect of malpractice reform on emergency department care
The New England Journal of Medicine
From Nov. 6: Many believe that fear of malpractice lawsuits drives physicians to order otherwise unnecessary care and that legal reforms could reduce such wasteful spending. Emergency physicians practice in an information-poor, resource-rich environment that may lend itself to costly defensive practice. Three states, Texas (in 2003), Georgia (in 2005), and South Carolina (in 2005), enacted legislation that changed the malpractice standard for emergency care to gross negligence. We investigated whether these substantial reforms changed practice.
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4. Why are healthcare workers getting infected with Ebola? We were not prepared
By Joan Spitrey
From Oct. 23: With the current infections of two direct caregivers, questions have surfaced regarding the preparedness of our hospitals and healthcare staff in the United States. As of this article, there have been no reports of the mode of transmission and/or contamination of the two healthcare workers. When Pham was diagnosed, the CDC was quick to blame the nurse for not following protocols. That was followed by the statement that the protocols were being evaluated. This raised the question that if the protocol was sufficient and the nurse was "to blame for her infection," why the sudden need to change the protocols?
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5. Governor McAuliffe announces measures to expand healthcare services to over 200,000 Virginians
Virginia.Gov
From Sept. 11: Governor McAuliffe launched A Healthy Virginia, a 10-step plan to expand healthcare services to over 200,000 Virginians. This plan is an unprecedented action by any governor in Virginia history and includes authorizations of four emergency regulations, one executive order, and innovative and creative solutions to expand healthcare to Virginia veterans, children and families.
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6. When the tiny hospital can't survive: Free-standing EDs with primary care seen as new rural model
Modern Healthcare
From Oct. 9: When Stewart-Webster Hospital in Richland, Georgia, closed its doors early last year, anxiety spread rapidly throughout the rural town of 1,500 residents. The critical-access hospital — one of the town's largest employers that had been around for more than six decades — could no longer overcome the financial problems that many rural facilities face: high unemployment in the community, high rates of uninsured and underinsured patients, and declining reimbursements from government payers.
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7. Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
By Joan Spitrey
From Oct. 9: As many are aware, the first travel-associated case of Ebola in the United States was confirmed on Sept. 30. The CDC and other key government officials have converged on the Dallas metropolitan area as contacts are identified and educated on signs and symptoms of the disease. As the story unfolded, hospital officials confirmed that the patient had told a hospital nurse of his recent travel from Liberia before being released from the hospital. It appears a few lessons can be learned from this situation. Unfortunately, in healthcare, lessons often come at a cost — human lives.
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8. Psychiatric 'boarding' in emergency departments ruled unconstitutional in Washington
ACEP
From Sept. 11: In a potentially precedent-setting ruling, the Washington State Supreme Court determined last week that psychiatric boarding — the process by which patients are admitted to a hospital, but remain in the emergency department for hours, even days, until psychiatric beds become available — is unconstitutional and violates the state's Involuntary Treatment Act.
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9. These are the 12 drugs sending the most kids to the emergency room
The Washington Post
From Sept. 25: Every year, more than 70,000 kids are taken to the emergency room because they accidentally overdosed on a medication, and most of those kids were less than 2 years old. Despite efforts to child-proof medication containers for both prescription and over the counter drugs, more young children are being sent to the emergency room because of their parents' prescription drugs every year, according to a new study.
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10. Hand-hygiene compliance drops at the end of shifts
FierceHealthcare
From Nov. 20: Hospital workers are less likely to wash their hands toward the end of their shifts, according to new research that suggests the lack of compliance is due to fatigue from the demands of the job. Researchers, led by Hengchen Dai, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pennsylvania, analyzed three years of hand-washing data from more than 4,000 caregivers in 35 hospitals across the U.S. published by the American Psychological Association.
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