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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit   December 04, 2014



 
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HAVE YOU RESERVED YOUR ROOM FOR
VACEP'S 2015 ANNUAL MEETING YET?


Reserve Your Homestead Room before Jan. 14, 2015
to receive VACEP’s special conference rate of $145!


The Omni Homestead Resort welcomes the Virginia College of Emergency Physicians.
We have provided special rates during your stay.

Conference Dates: Feb. 6-9, 2015
Rate: $145 per night
Resort Fee: 15%
Book By: Jan. 14, 2015

Click here to BOOK NOW or call 1.800.838.1766
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NEWS FROM VACEP AND VIRGINIA


VACEP ANNUAL MEETING NOTICE
Saturday, Feb. 7, 2015
11:15 - 12:15 a.m.
Commonwealth Room - Omni Homestead, Hot Springs VA
VACEP President Jeremiah O’Shea, M.D., FACEP, Presiding
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Earn 23 CMEs at The Homestead Feb. 6-9, 2015
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the American College of Emergency Physicians and Virginia Chapter ACEP. The American College of Emergency Physicians is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American College of Emergency Physicians designates this live activity for a maximum of 23.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Approved by the American College of Emergency Physicians for a maximum of 4.00 hour(s) of ACEP Category I credit.

Registration details coming soon.

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Operational Medical Director Half Day Workshop
Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Peninsulas EMS Council, Inc.
6898 Main Street, Gloucester, Virginia 23061
Contact: Bradley Beam, 804.693.6234, bbeam@vaems.org

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CONNECTING YOU WITH VIRGINIA EMERGENCY MEDICINE OPENINGS!
Visit EM Career Central this to find your next job in emergency medicine.


UPCOMING EVENTS

EVENT DATE MORE INFORMATION
OMD Training Dec. 11 PEMS/TEMS Office
VACEP Board of Directors Meeting Dec. 12 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
West Creek Emergency Center, Short Pump, VA
VACEP White Coats on Call Jan. 27, 2015 Richmond, Virginia
VACEP Annual Meeting
Feb. 6-9, 2015 Omni Homestead Resort


NEWS FROM ACEP AND OTHER IMPORTANT PARTNERS


ER visits at record high, 96 percent needed medical care within 2 hours
ACEP
The nation's emergency departments saw more than 136 million patient visits in 2011, the highest number ever recorded, compared with 129.8 million in 2010, according to new data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The percentage of patients with nonurgent medical conditions dropped by half — an overwhelming 96 percent were triaged as needing medical treatment within 2 hours, up from 92 percent in 2010.
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Whether you are job hunting, need to be credentialed, or just trying to stay organized...
Meet your new best friend — the ACEP Portfolio Tracker.


HOT TOPICS IN THE HEADLINES
Patients at emergency departments regarded as 'symptoms'
Health Canal
The healthcare work of providing care at Emergency departments is medicalized and result-driven. As a consequence of this, patients are regarded as “symptoms,” and are shunted around the department as “production units.” These are the conclusions of a thesis presented at the Sahlgrenska Academy.
READ MORE
Survey: Cost trumps health for many Americans
By Scott E. Rupp
As "Obamacare" is entering its second year of implementation, and open enrollment is currently upon us, Healthline — a provider of intelligent health information and technology solutions — has released the results from a new survey showcasing consumer's thoughts about the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and health insurance.
READ MORE
Improving performance in a hospital setting
Association for Talent Development
Crew resource management (CRM) is an established management style that promotes teamwork, improved communications, increased situational awareness, problem solving, decision making and risk mitigation through the combined use of many independent methods. The ultimate goal is performance improvement.
READ MORE


NEWS FROM AROUND THE INDUSTRY


Improving communications: What can hospitals learn from hotels?
By Archita Datta Majumdar
We live in an age where communication can make or break a deal. Doing it right has never been so important, yet there are more misunderstandings and misinterpretations all around. Ironic, isn't it? Since most have us become slaves to technology and instant communication, things actually can go wrong faster than ever before. There's a lesson to be learned here. And who better to learn from than the hospitality industry, which works on the basis of effective communication around the clock? At least that's what the healthcare industry is quickly figuring out.
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Hospital job growth continues its revival
Fierce Health Finance
Hospital hiring continues to rouse itself from its slumber, with another 3,500 jobs added to payrolls in October, according to new data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. About 25,200 more people are working at the nation's hospitals than they were a year ago, for a total of about 4.8 million hospital employees.
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Cocaine's heart damage often undetectable
Live Science
Using cocaine can damage the heart's smallest vessels, but this problem doesn't show up on routine medical tests, according to a new study. "We see many emergency room admissions because patients experience chest pain following cocaine use," said study researcher Dr. Varun Kumar, an internist at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago.
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Managing disruptive behavior by patients and physicians: A responsibility of the dialysis facility medical director
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Conditions for Coverage make the medical director of an ESRD facility responsible for all aspects of care, including high-quality health care delivery. Because of the high-pressure environment of the dialysis facility, conflicts are common. Conflict frequently occurs when aberrant behaviors disrupt the dialysis facility. Patients, family members, friends, and, less commonly appreciated, nephrology clinicians may manifest disruptive behavior. Disruptive behavior in the dialysis facility impairs the ability to deliver high-quality care.
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Deaths from heart disease down, up for blood pressure, irregular heartbeat
HealthDay News
Deaths from heart disease are dropping, but deaths related to high blood pressure and irregular heartbeats are on the rise, a new government study finds. From 2000 to 2010, the overall death rate from heart disease dropped almost 4 percent each year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers found. At the same time, death rates linked to high blood pressure-related heart disease increased 1.3 percent a year, according to the study. The researchers also found that deaths tied to irregular heartbeats rose 1 percent a year.
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Study: Extended anti-clotting therapy cut heart attacks after stent
Reuters
Patients who took two anti-clotting drugs for 30 months after undergoing a heart stent placement significantly cut their risk of heart attacks and blood clots in the stent compared with patients receiving the dual therapy for the standard 12 months, a clinical trial showed. In this five-year study of nearly 10,000 patients who had received drug-coated stents in an artery clearing procedure, the rate of heart attacks was 2.1 percent for those who received dual anti-clotting therapy for 30 months. The rate was 4.1 percent for those who got aspirin and a placebo after 12 months of dual therapy, researchers reported. That translated to 20 fewer heart attacks per 1,000 patients treated.
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MORE HEADLINES FROM AROUND THE INDUSTRY
 

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