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WESTERN SECTION UPDATE


Important Dates to Know
  • April 1 - Hotel Reservations Registration Opens
  • June 10 - Abstract Deadline
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UROLOGY INDUSTRY NEWS
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword Urology.


Prostate Cancer Surgery May Impair Sex for Both Partners
Reuters
Both members of a couple can experience diminished sexual function after a man has prostate cancer surgery, Swiss researchers find, suggesting that treatment should include sex counseling for men and their partners. The researchers studied sexual function and satisfaction after men had a type of cancer surgery designed to remove the entire prostate, including semen glands, but protect nearby nerves that are involved in erections.
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Underdiagnosis Common Among PCa Active Surveillance Candidates
Renal & Urology News
A worrisome number of prostate cancer (PCa) patients who meet European criteria for active surveillance (AS) might be underdiagnosed, according to a new Austrian study. Investigators from Medical University of Innsbruck discovered that 41.1 percent of roughly 200 Caucasian patients at their institution who would have qualified for AS, but opted for radical prostatectomy, had higher-grade disease on final histology from surgical specimens.
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Study: Meat-Heavy, High-Acid Diet Poses Risk for Those with Kidney Disease
HealthDay News
Patients struggling with chronic kidney disease who routinely consume meat-rich, highly acidic diets may boost their risk for kidney failure, a new study suggests. According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, kidney dysfunction can hamper the organ's elimination of acid from the body, causing a high-acid condition known as metabolic acidosis.
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Erectile Dysfunction May be 1st Sign of Heart Disease
Baylor College of Medicine News
Men with erectile dysfunction may also have an increased risk for developing heart disease, said an expert at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "There have been numerous studies demonstrating that cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction are linked," said Dr. Mohit Khera, associate professor in the Scott Department of Urology at Baylor. "Fifteen percent of men who have had erectile dysfunction will develop some form of cardiovascular adverse event within the next seven years. It may be the first sign or predictor for problems that will occur years from now."
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HEALTHCARE NEWS


This Incredible Hospital Robot is Saving Lives
Wired
Far down the hospital hall, double doors part to reveal the automaton. There's no dramatic fog or lighting, only a white, rectangular machine about four feet tall. It waits for the doors to fully part, then cautiously begins to roll toward us, going about as fast as a casual walk, emitting a soft beep every so often to let the humans around it know it’s on a very important quest. It's not traveling on a track. It's unleashed. It's free.
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The Private-Academic Surgeon Salary Gap: Would You Pick Academia if You Stood to Lose $1.3 million?
American College of Surgeons
Academic surgeons earn an average of 10 percent or $1.3 million less in gross income across their lifetime than surgeons in private practice, an analysis shows. Some surgical specialties fare better than others, with academic neurosurgeons having the largest reduction in gross income at $4.2 million (-24.2 percent), while academic pediatric surgeons earn $238,376 more (1.53 percent) than their private practice counterparts. They were the only ones to do so.
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How 2 States are Addressing Consumer Concerns about Narrow Networks
California Healthline
During the first enrollment period, some consumers learned that despite promises to the contrary, they were not able to keep their health care plans if they liked them. President Obama took immediate action to rectify the issue, letting people stay in their preferred plans even if those policies did not meet the Affordable Care Act's minimum coverage requirements. This year (2015), consumers ran into a different, but related, problem: After selecting and enrolling in their preferred plans through the ACA's exchanges, some people learned that they would not have access to the providers of their choice.
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EPs Face $200 Million in Meaningful Use Penalties in 2015
HealthData Management
Eligible professionals will pay about $200 million this year in the form of Medicare payment reductions for their failure to become meaningful users of electronic health records, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Speaking at Tuesday’s joint meeting of the Health IT Policy and Standards Committees, Elisabeth Myers from the CMS Center for Clinical Standards and Quality told members that about 256,000 EPs are currently subject to 2015 payment adjustments for failing to demonstrate MU in previous years.
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Google will Make Health Searches Less Scary with Fact-Checked Results
Wired
The search engine is trying to bring some much-needed validity to the world of health-related searches with a new database of 400 commonly searched medical conditions that have been extensively fact-checked by doctors at the Mayo Clinic. Google announced the news in a blog post Tuesday, saying that it will now surface these pre-vetted facts at the top of its search results, in hopes of getting people to the right information faster.
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Entire National Media Calling on Doctors to Violate Fundamental Medical Ethics in Push for Vaccines
NaturalNews
Like the infamous brownshirts who marched lockstep in obedience to their beloved dictator, nearly every major mainstream media outlet today is simultaneously and savagely ripping at those who choose not to vaccinate, calling for free-thinking parents to be jailed, have their children taken from them, and be forcibly injected with whatever vaccines the state deems necessary.
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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT


Physicians' Attire Linked to Patient Satisfaction Rates
HealthLeaders Media
What can incent a patient to trust a physician, follow her directions, and remember the interaction with satisfaction? One recent study released this week in The BMJ suggests that a conservative and professional style of dress — complete with the quintessential white coat — is where trust, patient compliance, and patient satisfaction begin.
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Researchers: Competition Pushes Physicians to Overprescribe Antibiotics
FiercePracticeManagement
While the growing problem of antibiotic resistance threatens lives and economies worldwide, prescription rates are higher in U.S. regions that are more physician-dense, particularly in areas where retail and other walk-in clinics drive competition among ambulatory providers for patients, according to a post in the Conversation.
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NEWS IN CALIFORNIA


10 California Hospitals Fined for Medical Errors
HealthLeaders Media
Because of serious medical mistakes at 10 California hospitals, eight patients died, an adolescent lost vision, and a tenth patient sustained severe bleeding from the nose due to medical errors, according to the California Department of Public Health. The CDPH announced the latest round of penalties, totaling $700,000. It said they are the result of "facilities' noncompliance with licensing requirements" that caused, or were likely to cause serious injury or death to patients.
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WSAUA Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lonny Alfred, Content Editor, 469.420.2663  
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